You are invited to attend the next Ordinary Meeting of Council:

 

Date:

Tuesday, 18 February 2020

Time:

6.30pm

Location:

Council Chamber

62-64 Menangle Street

Picton NSW 2571

 

AGENDA

 

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

18 February 2020

 

 

Ben Taylor

Chief Executive Officer

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

Order Of Business

1          Opening. 5

2          Recording of the Meeting. 5

3          Webcast Notice. 5

4          National Anthem.. 5

5          Acknowledgement of Country. 5

6          Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests. 5

7          Declaration of Interest 5

8          Confirmation of Minutes. 5

9          Items to be Tabled. 5

10       Mayoral Minute. 6

10.1          Mayoral Minute. 6

11       Sustainable and Balanced Growth. 7

11.1          Draft Planning Proposal - Brooks Point Road, Appin (Amendment 2) 7

11.2          Western Sydney and Illawarra Shoalhaven Roadmap to Collaboration. 17

11.3          Proposed Water Symposium.. 21

12       Management and Provision of Infrastructure. 24

12.1          Lease - Part Lot 11 DP 856694 Cnr Argyle & Menangle Streets, Picton - Old Post Office  24

12.2          Application for Fee Waiver for Facility Hire for DamFest 2019. 27

12.3          Master Plan for Redbank Reserve. 29

12.4          Amendment to Douglas Park Sportsground Master Plan. 31

12.5          Funding Strategy for the Master Plan for the Old Menangle School Site. 33

13       Caring for the Environment 35

13.1          Tree Management Policy. 35

14       Looking after the Community. 37

14.1          Financial Assistance: Donations and Sponsorship. 37

15       Efficient and Effective Council 38

15.1          Adoption of Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy. 38

15.2          Delegation of Functions of Council to the Chief Executive Officer 40

15.3          Classification of Council Managed Crown Land as Operational Status. 43

15.4          Investment of Funds as at 30 November 2019 and 31 December 2019. 45

15.5          Delivery and Operational Plan Progress Report 49

16       Notice of Motion/Rescissions. 50

16.1          Notice of Motion - Brimstone (Oakdale) Emergency Response Staging Area and Air Base. 50

16.2          Notice of Motion - Vegetation Clearing around Residences. 51

16.3          Notice of Motion - Solar Panels in New Dwellings. 52

 

17       Closed Reports. 53

17.1          Lease - Waste Management Facility - Wonga Road, Picton. 53

17.2          Proposed Acquisition - Lot 252 DP 257510 - 25 Government Road, Bargo. 53

17.3          Proposed Acquisition - Part Lots 6 & 10 DP 1057352  - 85-91 Argyle Street, Picton. 53

18       Questions for Next Meeting. 54

No reports this meeting

 


1            Opening

2            Recording of the Meeting

In accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice the electronic recording of the Council Meeting and the use of electronic media during the proceedings is not permitted. This includes devices such as laptops, mobile phones, tape recorders and video cameras.

3            Webcast Notice

Members of the public are advised, in accordance with Section 18 of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (PPIPA), that Wollondilly Shire Council records and webcasts live all Ordinary and Extraordinary Meetings of Council held in open session for the purpose of facilitating community access. The webcasts are publically available for viewing on Council’s website.

Video footage collected is of the decision making body only, if you do not wish your image to be recorded please remain in the public gallery. Your image, voice, personal and health information may be recorded, publicly broadcast and archived if you speak during the meeting and/or don’t remain in the space provided.

The webcasts and webcast recordings are protected by copyright and owned by Council. No part of the proceedings of a meeting of the Council may be recorded, copied or made available to others by members of the public without the authority of the Council.

Council may be required to disclose recordings pursuant to the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

4            National Anthem

5            Acknowledgement of Country

The Mayor will acknowledge the traditional Custodians of the Land.

6            Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests

7            Declaration of Interest

8            Confirmation of Minutes

Extraordinary Council Meeting - 16 December 2019

Extraordinary Council Meeting - 11 February 2020

9            Items to be Tabled


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

10          Mayoral Minute

10.1       Mayoral Minute

File Number:           10619-2#48

 

The Mayor may put to a meeting (without notice) any matter the Council is allowed to deal with or which the Council officially knows about.

 

Attachments

Nil

Recommendation

That the Mayoral Minute be accepted.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

11          Sustainable and Balanced Growth

11.1       Draft Planning Proposal - Brooks Point Road, Appin (Amendment 2)

File Number:           10619-2#37

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to seek a Council decision regarding Draft Planning Proposal for Brooks Point Road, Appin (Amendment 2)

·        The proposal seeks to amend the Wollondilly Local Environmental Plan 2011 (Wollondilly LEP 2011) by rezoning various adjacent lots on Brooks Point Road, Appin from RU2 Rural Landscape to a range of zones to enable residential development and a local centre.

·        The proposal was considered by the Local Planning Panel (LPP) on the 28 November 2019.

·        It is recommended that Council:

Notes the Local Planning Panel’s advice; and

Resolves not to support the Planning Proposal for Brooks Point Road, Appin.

Report

Background

A Planning Proposal was submitted for the Brooks Point Road site in June 2012. The proposal was for the rezoning of the site from RU2 Rural Landscape to R2 Low Density Residential, E2 Environmental Conservation and SP2 Infrastructure (Road), with the intention of developing 340 residential lots.

 

In March 2015 Council resolved that final determination on any proposals in the Macarthur South Investigation area be deferred until the Department of Planning & Environment (now Department of Planning, Industry & Environment (DPIE) had completed studies for the investigation area. Subsequently, Council in a letter dated 23 December 2015, invited the proponent to withdraw the proposal.

In December 2015 the proponent lodged a Pre-Gateway Review to the Minister for Planning. The Department determined that the proposal was ineligible for review as it was different from that previously submitted to Council.

At the time of assessment there were four active planning proposals in Appin, including the Brooks Point Road (Amendment 2) proposal. Collectively the dwelling yield is 11,788, and the collective area is 1,176.3 ha as shown in Table 1. Figure 1 shows the location of the four proposals in Appin.

 

Planning Proposal

Indicative dwelling yield

Area (ha)

Brooks Point Road Amendment 2

288

39

Appin Vale

4,000

525

North Appin

4,000

368.3

Brooks Point (West Appin)

3,500

244

 

Total:

11,788

1,176.3

Table 1: Indicative yield of planning proposals

 

The NSW Government’s Greater Macarthur 2040: An Interim Plan for the Greater Macarthur Growth Area (GM2040) (released by the Department of Planning, Industry & Environment in November 2018) document identifies that North Appin precinct will deliver 5,000 homes and the Appin precinct (also referred to as West Appin) will deliver 15,000 homes. The North Appin precinct and Appin (West Appin) precinct cover an area of 3,628ha. The proposals cover less than a third of land within GM2040 as it relates to Appin however they collectively provide over half of the total expected residential yield. Progressing significant housing in absence of a full understanding of the whole Appin land release area would compromise the objectives of Greater Macarthur 2040. A full assessment against Greater Macarthur 2040 is outlined below.

Figure 1: Location of the four current planning proposals in Appin, including the subject site

Note: Three of the Appin Planning Proposals were withdrawn prior to the Local Planning Panel meeting. The Brooks Point Road proposal (subject proposal) was the only Appin proposal that was considered by the Panel. The recommendations for each proposal were the same, ie, that all proposals are premature, inconsistent with GM 2040 and should not be supported.

Planning Proposal

In March 2018, a planning proposal (as attached) was lodged by Michael Gordon of John M Daly & Associates on behalf of Appin Farmers Pty Ltd and Auslands Developments Pty Ltd, for Brooks Point Road, Appin, including for the following lots:

·        Lot 1 DP 249446 (No. 10)

·        Lot 2 DP 584515 (No. 14)

·        Lot 1 DP 584515 (No. 20)

·        Lot 3 DP 249446 (No. 30)

·        Lot 4 DP 249446 (No. 50)

·        Lot 5 DP 249446 (No. 70)

 

The subject site is within the Appin suburb, is zoned Rural Landscape and has an area of approximately 39 hectares. It covers six separate lots with three different landowners. It is noted that the third landowner is not a proponent of the proposal, however the proponent advises that the third owner supports the proposal. The site is bound by Appin Road to the east, Ousedale Creek to the west, the Macquariedale Road Planning Proposal to the north and Brooks Road to the south. Figure 2 provides a site context map with aerial.

 

 

Figure 2: Site identification map

The proposal seeks to amend the Wollondilly LEP 2011 by rezoning the subject site from RU2 Rural Landscape to R2 Low Density Residential, E2 Environmental Conservation and SP2 Infrastructure (Road), E4 Environmental Living and B2 Local Centre zones. The current and proposed zoning is shown in Figure 3.

 

The proposal seeks to amend the minimum lot size from 40ha to 250m2 and 450m2 in the proposed R2 zone, and 900m2, 1500m2 and 4000m2 in the proposed E4 zone, as shown in Figure 4.

 

Figure 3: Current and Proposed Zoning

The indicative plan for the proposal is for smaller lots in the eastern portion of the site, including lots with minimum lot sizes of 250m2 and 450m2 for residential development, and a local centre in the north east of the precinct.

The indicative plan for the western portion of the site proposes large lots, including minimum lot sizes of 900m2, 1500m2 and 4000m2 for residential development, and two lots of 4ha and 7.4ha for conservation land.

The proposal notes the intent is to deliver up to 288 residential lots (as opposed to 340 residential lots under the June 2012 proposal) and an expected yield of up to 4,300m2 of retail/business employment floor space for the local centre.

The proposal also intends to provide an easement for Appin Bypass, separating the eastern and western portion of the site. Figure 4 provides an indicative plan for the site.

Figure 4: Indicative plan – minimum lot sizes, conservation land and local centre

PLANNING CONTEXT

Western District Plan

The Appin area forms part of the Greater Macarthur Growth Area, and together with the Wilton Growth Area they are the only two locations in Wollondilly identified as a ‘land release area’ or ‘urban area’ as opposed to a Metropolitan Rural Area under the Western District Plan (District Plan). The planning proposal for urban purposes is consistent in this regard.

The District Plan sets a 5 year (2016-2021) housing supply target for Wollondilly Shire Council of 1550 dwellings. Dwelling completions since 2016, combined with existing capacity of rezoned land and the Wilton Growth Area are expected to satisfy this requirement. The Greater Macarthur Growth Area is not required in the short term to meet this housing target.

Under the District Plan the timeframe for provision of housing in the Appin area is medium to long term. The District Plan also outlines a number of directions and priorities requiring an integrated approach to land use and transport, delivery of lead-in infrastructure, and the protection and enhancement of bushland and biodiversity. This detailed planning has not yet been undertaken for these matters.

It would be inappropriate to progress rezoning for housing without appropriate strategic planning and infrastructure planning work. In this regard the draft planning proposal is considered inconsistent with the District Plan and premature.

Greater Macarthur 2040: An Interim Plan for the Greater Macarthur Growth Area.

The planning proposal sits wholly within the Greater Macarthur Growth Area and is subject to assessment under the Greater Macarthur 2040: An Interim Plan for the Greater Macarthur Growth Area (GM2040). At the time of the assessment and Appin had not been declared a growth area under the relevant state legislation nor has GM2040 been finalised. This has since changed however this declaration does not address the outstanding work needed to support Appin.

The planning proposal is considered premature for the following reasons:

·        GM2040 identified 15,000 dwellings for Appin precinct (also referred to as West Appin) and 5,000 dwellings for North Appin precinct in the longer term. The scale of the combined active Appin proposals represent more than half of the expected total and no studies for the whole of the Appin area have been undertaken nor has there been commitment to key infrastructure items required prior to the delivery of housing.

·        GM2040 requires further studies for any rezoning and outlines that these should consider the development potential of Appin as a whole. A piecemeal development approach prior to undertaking these precinct wide studies is inappropriate and risks the delivery of unsustainable communities.

·        Planning proposals that would enable significant growth in Appin are out of sequence and pre-empt proper master planning and infrastructure planning. This could comprise higher order assets, such as transport corridors, being delivered. Final decisions need to be made, on the location of the Outer Sydney Orbital, east west connections and more locally the Appin bypass, before planning for additional housing can be undertaken. The ‘Future Indicative Corridor map’ extracted from GM2040 is attached at Attachment 2 and annotated for the purposes of this report.

It will also be critical to provide a connection between Appin and Wilton in the long term. This is still a gap in the GM2040 and draft State Infrastructure Contribution (SIC) and requires further work.

·        Similarly, GM2040 and Wilton have been prepared in isolation, with little cumulative analysis considered and orderly sequencing of planning and infrastructure considered.

·        Substantial growth in Appin will require investment in:

a)      transport infrastructure, including public transport;

b)      community infrastructure;

c)      planning for conservation of habitat and protection of koalas;

d)      integrated water and waste water management;

e)      connectivity between communities;

f)       public open space;

g)      jobs;

h)      education; and

i)        servicing, including the provision of a new electricity substation.

·        GM2040 outlines that an important component of the Greater Macarthur growth will be its connected network of transportation options, including integrated public transport, direct walking and cycling routes and well-designed roads. This requires integrated solutions for the whole of the growth area and provision of funding. This work is yet to be undertaken for the Appin area.

·        Environmental conservation and protection is listed as an important element in the development of the Greater Macarthur. The Department is undertaking a Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan (CPCP) which aims to identify conservation measures to protect a range of threatened flora and fauna species and ecological communities, including Sydney’s largest koala population. This plan is yet to be finalised.

Any development prior to the finalisation of the CPCP is premature and could jeopardise the viability of the conservation and protection of the areas threatened flora and fauna species and ecological communities.

·        Council’s focus for housing in the next 10 to 20 years is within in the Wilton Priority Growth Area, which is set to deliver 15,000 dwellings. Having multiple growth fronts would disperse state and local resources including infrastructure investment, creating unnecessary competition which may compromise outcomes for both fronts in which neither vision has the opportunity to be fully realised.

Additionally, GM2040 outlines that West Appin’s potential for rezoning for housing is long term and current forecasts suggest that not all growth will be required before 2036.

·        Any development of the Appin area is also premature in terms of servicing. GM2040 and (and submissions from utility agencies) outline that any development in Appin will require construction and/or significant augmentation of infrastructure.

Significant investigation and planning work, constraints analysis, studies, Infrastructure analysis, phasing and lead in, Agency work and structure planning will be required before any planning body can be in an informed position to make planning judgements for the West Appin area.

Note: The DPIE declared the Greater Macarthur Area a Growth Area on the 6 December 2019. However, no rezoning can occur until the further work (outlined above) is undertaken.

Community Strategic Plan 2033

The Community Strategic Plan (CSP 2033) notes that Council's priority focus for growth will be the development of a new town at Wilton and Council will not support the development of new towns or villages in other areas of the Shire.

The CSP also states that Council will not be supporting major urban development or the development of new towns or villages within its rural areas including those parts of Wollondilly that are in the ‘Greater Macarthur Land Release Investigation Area” (other than its commitment to the development of a major new town at Wilton).

The proposal is considered inconsistent with the relevant priorities and objectives of the CSP.

Wollondilly 2040 (Draft Local Strategic Planning Statement)

Council resolved at its Extraordinary meeting of 24 September 2019 to exhibit a draft Local Strategic Planning Statement until 1 November 2019.

The draft LSPS provide some clear framework regarding growth in Wilton and GM2040 and that appropriate infrastructure and planning needs to occur.

Consistency against Section 9.1 Directions

An assessment against the relevant Directions is attached at Attachment 3. The assessment notes there are inconsistencies with the Directions.

Consistency against State Environment Planning Policies

An assessment against the relevant SEPPs is attached at Attachment 4. The assessment notes there are inconsistencies with the SEPP.

Consultation

Preliminary consultation regarding the planning proposal was undertaken from 6 January to 27 February 2019. Eighteen public submissions were received in response to the consultation, with seventeen objecting and one neutral. Feedback was also received from relevant Council staff and NSW Government agencies. A table addressing all the submissions by issue is found in the attachments. The main issues are outlined below:

Key Issues

·        Rural character being eroded. Should be preserved for food production and the natural environment.

·        Impact on healthy koala population.

·        Inadequate road infrastructure e.g. Appin Road, Broughton Pass, Brooks Point Road.

·        Inadequate school and health facilities i.e. upgrade of existing school, need for high school and existing Campbelltown hospital needs upgrade.

·        Poor air quality will only be exacerbated by new development.

·        Potential contamination of waterways.

·        Inadequate emergency services and police coverage.

·        Safety issues at intersection of Wilton and Appin Road and Macquariedale Road.

·        Existing vegetation clearing problem.

·        Existing commercial precinct struggling.

·        Inadequate public transport.

·        Water pressure insufficient.

·        Inadequate employment.

·        Inadequate bushfire evacuation.

 

Public Agency

Comments on the proposal were requested from relevant public agencies. Public agency responses are outlined in the table below. It is noted that Sydney Water cannot service this site for either waste water or potable water.

 

Public Agency

Comments

Roads and Maritime Services (RMS)

· Detailed traffic study required.

· Proposal includes SP2 zoned land set aside for a bypass.

Rural Fire Service (RFS)

· Not supported in current form.

· Western E3/E4 perimeter road needs to incorporate a perimeter road.

· Bushfire assessments required prior to Gateway.

· Proposal needs to ensure development has appropriate roads for emergency egress and minimum lot sizes can demonstrate appropriate APZs.

Water NSW

· Development is outside Sydney drinking water catchment area therefore no comment.

DPE – Div. of Resources and Geoscience

· Mineral resources already extracted from this area, therefore no objections to this proposal.

Sydney Water

· Sydney Water cannot service this site for either waste water or potable water.

· There are significant constraints on the site and there will need to be a large amount of investment to upgrade existing infrastructure and it is some distance from existing services.

· The developer must undertake both water and waste water servicing options for the site.

Endeavour Energy

· Appin Zone Substation has the capacity to service the site, with some augmentation in infrastructure that supplies the site.

· The developer will need to submit an application for connection of load via Endeavour Energy’s Network Connections Branch to carry out the final load assessment and the method of supply will be determined.

· The applicant should consider engaging a level 3 accredited service provider to design distribution network and assets.

Mine Subsidence Authority

No reply

 

Consultation with public agencies indicate that development of the subject site is premature due to the inability to service the site for either wastewater or potable water and a requirement for significant construction or augmentation of the power network. Further, a comprehensive traffic study would need to be undertaken. Given the level of growth expected in the long term in Appin, any traffic study would need to consider the whole of the Appin area.

The applicant has been advised that Planning Proposal is being reported to the Local Planning Panel with a recommendation not to support. The applicant has been offered the option of withdrawing the proposal but has not taken up this option.

Financial Implications

Given the preliminary stage of these proposals, no detailed analysis of infrastructure or financial implications for Council has been undertaken.  It is noted that a comprehensive assessment of the relevant financial implications to State and regional infrastructure has also not yet occurred. The lack of assessment is supported by the feedback received from State Agencies. 

It is also noted that this proposal is premature. If supported, would divert Council resources from programmed work occurring on Wilton 2040, the draft Wilton DCP and other collaborative planning with DPIE.

Conclusion

The planning proposal seeks to amend Wollondilly LEP 2011 for a range of adjoining lots on Brooks Point Road, Appin, from RU2 Rural Landscape to a range of zones, including residential and for a local centre. Agencies have identified significant barriers to infrastructure deliverability and serviceability. Growth in Appin needs to be co-ordinated and not piecemeal.

The proposal is not considered to have strategic merit for the following reasons:

1.       The proposal is premature, given the lack of services, and there is no a short term need for growth. GM2040 states that Appin (also referred to as West Appin) has the potential for housing in the long term and current forecasts suggest not all the Growth Area will be required before 2036.

2.       The Community Strategic Plan 2033 states that Council will not be supporting major urban developments in the West Appin area.

3.       Greater Macarthur 2040: An Interim Plan for the Greater Macarthur has not yet been finalised.

4.       Further studies need to be completed for the Appin area as a whole to determine the appropriate scale, location and timing of any growth, as well as to ensure the necessary infrastructure is provided.

5.       The creation of two major growth fronts would create competing demands for servicing, funding, infrastructure delivery and Council resources.

 

6.       The proposal and lead in infrastructure is not available and cannot be serviced by Sydney Water and there is insufficient detail on the required financial costs and infrastructure required to support this site and the cumulative growth of other proposals within the Appin area. 

Advice from the Wollondilly Local Planning Panel (LPP)

The proposal was considered by the LPP on the 28 November 2019 and concurred with the officer’s assessment of the planning proposal and recommends that Council not support the planning proposal for the following reasons:

1.     The proposal is premature;

2.     Support of the Planning Proposal would jeopardise good planning practice;

3.     The proposal jeopardises the realisation of the planning priorities of the Western City District Plan; and

4.     The Planning Proposal has failed to demonstrate that services and infrastructure can be provided to support the planned development.

 

The LPP meeting minutes is attached as Attachment 5.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS 

1.       Brooks Point Road, Appin Planning Proposal  

2.       Indicative Future Transport Map  

3.       Brooks Point Road, Appin Planning Proposal - Assessment against S9.1 Directions  

4.       Consistency against State Environmental Planning Policies  

5.       Minutes of the LPP meeting of 28 November 2019 and Panel Advice   

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Notes the Local Planning Panel’s advice;

2.       Resolves not to support the Planning Proposal for Brooks Point Road, Appin.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

11.2       Western Sydney and Illawarra Shoalhaven Roadmap to Collaboration

File Number:           10619#962

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to brief Council on the Western Sydney and Illawarra Shoalhaven Roadmap to Collaboration

·        It is recommended that Council:

o   Notes the report;

o   Agrees to continue the positive and collaborative advocacy with the Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisation (ISJO), the Illawarra Business Chamber and other relevant stakeholders; and

o   Pursues the use of existing appropriate Governance frameworks as far as possible for delivery of the Action Plan including the City Deal committees, the Planning Partnership office if appropriate for the delivery of the Action Plan.

Report

Our place in South West Sydney & the Illawarra-Shoalhaven

The Wollondilly Shire is uniquely placed to be a key connection between Western Sydney and Illawarra-Shoalhaven, and this provides some excellent opportunities for interconnectivity, collaboration and mutually accessible financial growth. 

It was recognised that Western Sydney is currently experiencing unprecedented growth which is impacting on jobs, housing and infrastructure. We are expecting to see:

·        a population increase from 825,900 to 1.53 million in 2036 (that’s 464,450 additional people) in the Western District

·        184,500 additional dwellings

·        a brand new 24 hour airport.

Last year, Western Sydney councils entered into a City Deal with the State and Federal governments, building on the $5.3 billion investment in the Western Sydney Airport. The airport and Aerotropolis will be a catalyst for economic activity and jobs growth, providing long-term employment opportunities for local residents as well as meeting Sydney’s growing aviation needs. It also provides significant transformative opportunities for the western Sydney region, greater Sydney and the state of NSW. 

The Wollondilly Shire is uniquely placed to be a key connection between Western Sydney and Illawarra-Shoalhaven, and this provides some excellent opportunities. Wollondilly together with adjoining Councils, Campbelltown and Camden have a major opportunity to benefit from long term economic and employment opportunities, accelerate development of critical infrastructure, providing additional opportunities for Illawarra Shoalhaven to connect with Western Sydney jobs, investment, tourism, and education.

What is the Roadmap to Collaboration?

In 2018, Council officers were contacted by the Regional Team of the then former Department of Premier and Cabinet (now part of Department of Planning, Industry and Environment) asking if it we would like to have a representative sit on a steering committee to help create a new action plan – to be titled ‘a Roadmap to Collaboration’ between Western Sydney and the Illawarra Shoalhaven regions.

The Roadmap to Collaboration initiative has explored the benefits that the aerotropolis and committed infrastructure will bring to western Sydney, and importantly, how south western Sydney and Illawarra-Shoalhaven can work in a mutually harmonious way to secure a thriving economy, built on recognising our individual strengths and our collective abilities. 

This process has been a cooperative effort between different levels of government, across political lines and with the input of many experienced senior staff.

It has been recognised that there are some positive opportunities in education, tourism and freight which will come with establishing the right connections between the two regions, and Wollondilly can play a vital role in realising those opportunities. Some of these include:

·        Improving transport infrastructure for better freight and passenger connectivity between Illawarra Shoalhaven and Western Sydney.

·        Working together to research, package and promote the tourist attractions of both regions.

·        Investigating the feasibility of developing a cross-regional Smart City Strategy with tangible outcomes and a clear vision by looking at the some of the ground work undertaken already in western Sydney which provides a mechanism for how we could work together in a three-way government/industry coordinated approach.

·        Activating under-utilised land in both regions.

·        Leveraging plans for Universities to join forces to deliver a world-class higher education and research presence in the Western Sydney Aerotropolis.

What is in the Action Plan?

Following some collaborative workshops with key stakeholders, the action plan was set out to address a number of priority areas including:

·        Advanced manufacturing.

·        Education.

·        Freight and passenger transport.

·        Smart City technology.

·        Visitor economy.

·        Western Sydney Airport and Aerotropolis.

 

A summary of how these Priorities (and their opportunities) relate to Wollondilly is provided below.

Advanced manufacturing.

Opportunities identified in the plan include activating underutilised land - complete land use studies across both regions to help identify and activate under-utilised manufacturing and commercial land across both regions.

Education:

Education opportunities have been identified to leverage plans for the University of Wollongong, University of Newcastle, University of NSW and Western Sydney University to join forces to deliver a world-class higher education and research presence in the Western Sydney Aerotropolis.

Freight and passenger transport.

The Action Plan states that improving transport infrastructure and connections between Illawarra Shoalhaven and Western Sydney will be crucial to fully realising opportunities between both regions.

 

The Plan states:

…”This, along with investigations into the Outer Sydney Orbital, Hume Motorway to the Illawarra connections; Fast Rail, Sydney to Nowra via Wollongong; and the Maldon to Dombarton freight rail line have the potential to provide improved road and rail connectivity between Western Sydney and the Illawarra for both passengers and freight.

Smart City technology.

The ISJO is has been tasked to explore how the Illawarra Shoalhaven can work with the University of Wollongong’s SMART Infrastructure Facility to capitalise on investments through the Western Parkland City’s 5G strategy, noting that smart city programs will rely heavily on 5G-based infrastructure (e.g. autonomous cars, new modes of public transport, smart buildings).

Council is the lead in the City Deal space in smart cities, and has an opportunity (with western city councils) to investigate feasibility of developing a cross-regional Smart City Strategy.

Visitor economy.

The plan identifies the proximity of the Illawarra Shoalhaven’s beaches and national parks to Western Sydney as being ideal for short- and long-stay visitors from Western Sydney and there are significant opportunities to promote and grow this sector across both regions.

There is shared opportunity to research, package and promote tourist attractions of both regions together via cross-regional working groups to develop products and infrastructure that benefit the visitor economy of both regions.

Western Sydney Airport and Aerotropolis.

The Western Sydney Airport and Aerotropolis will provide long-term economic and employment opportunities for the local area, the Western City, cross region and for NSW if critical infrastructure is provided. The plan highlights these opportunities and key linkages.

Next Steps

In terms of next steps, the ‘project’ now switch into an implementation phase, which will be led by the Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisation (ISJO). The ISJO and Steering Committee will meet during 2020 to the deliver on the priorities and actions listed in Roadmap.

Regional NSW (now DPIE) will convene a meeting of Committee members in March 2019 to evaluate the status of cross-regional stakeholder relations and Roadmap actions and assess if any changes are required.

While the Governance and Implementation chapter provides suggested mechanisms for delivery, it notes “A formal governance structure for the delivery of the Roadmap to Collaboration will be determined by the Project Steering Committee in consultation with key stakeholders”.

To assist in the best interests for Wollondilly Shire, and for local government in the South West Region, Council officers will pursue the use of existing Governance frameworks as far as possible including the City Deals committees, and the Planning Partnership office if appropriate.  These bodies serve a broad interest for a number of Western Sydney Councils and are best served to assist in collaborative exercise particularly as they relate to supporting and enhancing the function and viability of the region and the Aerotropolis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Western Sydney and Illawarra Shoalhaven Roadmap to Collaboration   

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Notes the report;

2.       Agrees to continue the positive and collaborative advocacy with the Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisation (ISJO), the Illawarra Business Chamber and other relevant stakeholders; and

3.       Pursues the use of existing appropriate Governance frameworks as far as possible for delivery of the Action Plan including the City Deal committees, the Planning Partnership office if appropriate for the delivery of the Action Plan.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

11.3       Proposed Water Symposium

File Number:           10619-2#30

 

Executive Summary

At the Ordinary Meeting held on 16 September 2019, Council resolved as follows:

RESOLUTION  219/2019

Moved:      Cr Judith Hannan

Seconded: Cr Matthew Gould

1.       That we invite the Department of Planning Industry and Environment, the local State and Federal members, the IPART, Sydney Water and Water NSW to a Community Forum to explain the water supply and pricing to Wilton new town and the Greater Macarthur.

2.       That a report be submitted to Council on the cost of holding a water symposium with all Councils supplied by the Upper Nepean.

         

The letters required in Part 1 of the Resolution have been sent with responses received as detailed later in this report.

The purpose of this report is to respond to Part 2 of the Resolution.

This report recommends that Council writes to Sydney Water to propose that Sydney Water leads a water symposium for all of Greater Sydney given water security is a critical issue for the whole of Greater Sydney and in light of the current drought and bushfire emergency.

Report

Future water security is a State issue and it is important that Sydney Water and the NSW Government lead the proposed water symposium.  This is a significant issue for the whole of Greater Sydney, not just Wilton, Wollondilly or Greater Macarthur. 

Greater Western Sydney's (GWS) population growth is expected to grow from 2.2m to 2.9m, to house more than 50% of the Greater Sydney Region's population by 2036. This is based on forecast household growth from 730,000 to over 1.1 million over that period.  Water security is a key issue for the future planning of Greater Sydney, and Western Sydney in particular.

Now is an ideal time for Sydney Water and State, Local and Federal government to come together to explore water security and future supply options. The ongoing drought and the recent bushfire emergency highlight the need for a holistic approach to water planning.  New approaches to supply are currently being explored by Sydney Water for the Western Parkland City and the future  Aerotropolis, with the Aerotropolis plan currently on exhibition.  The recent bushfires have also led to concerns about contamination of Warragamba Dam water supplies by ash and debris, leading to the installation of boom, silk netting and increased treatment.  Just prior to the recent rain, Warragamba dam levels were down to 43 per cent, which is the lowest level since 2004 during the millennium drought. 

The State government has also announced it will fast-track an expansion of Sydney's desalination plant, which will double it in size to provide more than 30 per cent of the city's drinking water. The NSW Water Minister Melinda Pavey said the expansion of the plant in Kurnell was a key element in protecting Sydney's water security.  The government is also looking at a range of other measures to boost water supplies in Sydney, including the expansion of recycling of water from toilets for public spaces, backyards and gardens.

Additionally, IPART is currently reviewing Sydney Water and WaterNSW’s Greater Sydney water pricing strategies, to apply from 1 July 2020.  It is important that the outcomes of the current IPART review are also considered during the proposed water symposium.

Responses to letters sent in October 2019

Responses were received from the following agencies:

·    IPART;

·    DPIE;

·    Angus Taylor’s office; and

·    Sydney Water.

 

In addition, verbal advice was received from Sydney Water followed by a meeting with Councillors in November when water planning for Wollondilly Shire and Wilton Growth Area in particular was discussed.

Estimated symposium cost

It is estimated the proposed symposium would cost in the vicinity of $20,000 based on the cost of the Koala Summit and Trax to the Future Summit. This would require a budget adjustment subject to the date and location of the symposium.  However, there would be no cost to Council if the symposium was convened by Sydney Water.

 

CONCLUSION

Now is an ideal time for Sydney Water and State, Local and Federal governments to come together to explore water security and future supply options. Future water security is a State issue and it is important that Sydney Water and the NSW Government lead the proposed water symposium. 

Consultation

This report has been prepared in consultation with relevant Council departments.  Letters were sent to external agencies as per the Council resolution of 16 September 2019 and responses received as detailed earlier in this report.

Financial Implications

No funding has been allocated for this project/item, and budget adjustment would be required should Council organise the proposed symposium.  However, there would be no cost to Council if Sydney Water convened the symposium.

Attachments

Nil

Recommendation

That Council:

1.   Notes the advice in this report regarding responses from agencies as per the resolution of 16 September 2019.

2.   Formally requests that Sydney Water convene a Greater Sydney water symposium as a matter of priority given the continuing drought and recent bushfire emergency, and the importance of securing Sydney’s future water security ahead of population growth planned for Western Sydney.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

12          Management and Provision of Infrastructure

12.1       Lease - Part Lot 11 DP 856694 Cnr Argyle & Menangle Streets, Picton - Old Post Office

File Number:           10619#828

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to vary the terms of agreement to lease land from Council for outdoor dining purposes located on the grass area at the rear of the Old Post Office in Picton (CM Ref:9294).

·        This report recommends that:

o   Council continue to support negotiations for the lease over part of the property known as Lot 11 DP 856694 Corner Argyle and Menangle Streets, Picton (“Old Post Office”) and authorise the Chief Executive Officer and Mayor to execute all documentation in relation to the lease including those requiring the Common Seal of Council.

o   The applicant enter into a lease within six months from the date of this report.

o   The conditions of the lease be in accordance with this report and advice from Council’s legal advisor to ensure Council’s best interests are upheld.

o   All costs and disbursements to enter into the lease be at the applicant’s expense.

Report

On 20 February 2017, it was determined under resolution No. 12/2017 that Council enter into a lease with the adjoining land owner over the grassed area beside the Old Post Office (image below) within two years from the date of the report to Council.

The applicant has written to Council wishing to a change the term of the agreement and has requested a reduction in rent due to the positioning of the air conditioners.

Previous Agreement 2016

Area:          Subject to Survey – approximately 76m2.

Terms:        4 x 5 year lease = 20 years.

Rent:          $61/m2 per annum excluding GST.

Outgoing:   The Lessor is responsible to pay all outgoings such as (but not limited to) rates, water, trade waste, electricity, gas, sewerage, taxes and/or levies against the property.

The timing and endorsement of the Lease was subject to the applicant submitting a Development Application for redevelopment of their site previously known as Lot 1 and 2 DP 563577 (now known as Lot 12 DP 1255815).

The lease will be conditional upon the applicant acknowledging:

·        There is an encumbrance on title which provides “that the user not make alterations to ground surface levels”.

·        Additional restrictions will be imposed on the lease as follows:

o   That no structure be built on the land (only lightweight structures will be permitted e.g. a shade sail).

o   This condition is subject to Council’s approval following submission of detailed drawings and specifications. It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure development approval is granted from the relevant consent authorities.

·        The land is to be used solely for outdoor dining/open space purposes.

·        That Council, its contractors and its representatives at all times be provided access to the sewer point for maintenance or any other infrastructure requiring maintenance.

·        That the applicant relies entirely upon its own enquiries and inspection in relation to entering into a lease agreement.

·        If the applicant receives a positive resolution from Council, it is proposed that a two year period be allowed for the lease to be taken up.

Due to the time delay, Council applied an increase in rent to $64/m2 taking into account CPI increases. The applicant has requested Council to reassess the rent due to the devaluing of the land by the “unsightly air conditioners placed in the middle of the grassed area”.

Since the Council report in 2017, the air conditioning units were installed next to the proposed leased area as a part of repair works to the Old Post Office following the 2016 flood event and the need to protect the masonry from further deleterious impacts of air conditioning operations. The air conditioning units are perceived as changing the ambiance of the location with possible increases in noise and air flow onto diners.

As a part of current design works for the next stage of repair works for the Old Post Office, another potential location and impact mitigation is being assessed.

It is considered reasonable to agree to commence the rent at $61/m2 as agreed in 2016 if the applicant enters into the agreement in the next two years. The proponent will be able to propose minor landscaping works such as additional garden/shrubs etc to improve the visual amenity of the area at their expense.

Management of the property would be about 15% which includes staff time/wages, land rates, water rates, insurance and other outgoings.

New Proposed Agreement 2020

That the applicant be allowed a further two years to take up the option to lease the land.

That Council agree not to increase the rent in accordance with CPI increases.

That the terms of the lease be in accordance with legal representative advice and the following:

Area:          Subject to Survey - approximately 76m2.

Term:         4 x 5 year lease = 20 years.

Rent:                    $61/m2 per annum excluding GST and in accordance with CPI increases.

The lease will finalised in alignment with the approved Development Application or subsequent modifications (DA Reference: D010.201700000.401.001).

The land is classified as “Operational” which allows Council to enter into these negotiations.

Image of proposed lease area:

Impact on Remaining Property

The remaining land within the allotment, the Old Post Office site, will have additional constraints imposed on it for any building upgrades or service capacity and possible hours of operations in the courtyard area. 

Consultation

·        Council’s Valuer

·        General Counsel.

Financial Implications

The rent from the premises will improve the rental income to Council and has no financial burden on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates. The applicant has provided written undertaking to pay all costs including disbursements to enter into the lease.

Attachments

Nil

Recommendation

1.       That Council continue to support negotiations for the lease over part of the property known as Lot 11 DP856694 Corner Argyle and Menangle Streets, Picton (“Old Post Office”) and authorise the Chief Executive Officer and Mayor to execute all documentation in relation to the lease including those requiring the Common Seal of Council.

2.       That the applicant enter into a lease within six months from the date of this report.

3.       That the conditions of the lease be in accordance with this report and advice from Council’s legal advisor to ensure Council’s best interests are upheld.

4.       That all costs and disbursements to enter into the lease be at the applicant’s expense.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

12.2       Application for Fee Waiver for Facility Hire for DamFest 2019

File Number:           10619-2#32

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to bring forward an Application from Warragamba Silverdale Neighbourhood Centre for a fee waiver of the fees associated with the hire of Waterboard Oval and Warragamba Recreation Reserve for DamFest 2019 held on 20 October 2019.

·        This report recommends that Council:

o   Waives the hire fee for the DamFest 2019 festival for the hire of Waterboard Oval and Warragamba Recreation Reserve by the DamFest Committee.

o   In the drafting of the 2020/21 Operational Plan and supporting Fees & Charges that the application of hire fees for community festivals/events be considered.

Report

The DamFest Committee submitted an application for a fee waiver or reduction for the fees applicable to their hire of Waterboard Oval and Warragamba Recreation Reserve for DamFest 2019.

In accordance with the policy Reduction or Waiver of Council Fees and Charges Policy, applications that do not exceed $1,000.00 are determined by the Chief Executive Officer. As the applicable fees total $1,030.50, a report has been brought to Council for determination.

The DamFest Committee is a sub-Committee of Warragamba Silverdale Neighbourhood Centre.

DamFest is an annual event held at Warragamba Recreation Reserve and Waterboard Oval. It is a community fair with rides, stalls and live entertainment, a car show, bike show, swap meet and emergency service displays. The event organisers advise that the event is to raise funds for community projects and to allow other community organisations to fund raise at a venue that can bring in a much broader audience that is usually available.

While no financial information has been provided with the 2019 application, in 2016 the approximate turn over for this event was $25,000.

 

Background and Other Considerations

The policy requires applicants to provide evidence of financial hardship when making application for a fee waiver; however, no evidence of financial hardship has been provided with the application.

The DamFest Committee already receive considerable support from Council for their annual event:

·    Council provides $1,500.00 sponsorship for this event on an annual basis.

·    Council provides significant in-kind support to this annual event including providing staff and waste services to the value of approximately $8,000 each year. This in-kind support is well above the support that Council provides to other annual events within Wollondilly.

Options

Council can:

1.       Approve the waiver of the hire fees in the amount of $1,031.50.

2.       Decline the waiver of the hire fees in the amount of $1,031.50.

Consultation

Not applicable.

 

Financial Implications

Council has already provided financial and in-kind support to this event. The cost to Council to waive the fees will be a loss of external income to the Facilities Maintenance section of Council.

Attachments

Nil

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Waives the hire fee for the DamFest 2019 festival for the hire of Waterboard Oval and Warragamba Recreation Reserve by the DamFest Committee.

2.       In the drafting of the 2020/21 Operational Plan and supporting Fees & Charges that the application of hire fees for community festivals/events be considered.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

12.3       Master Plan for Redbank Reserve

File Number:           10619-2#38

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to inform Council about the results of the community engagement process undertaken to develop a master plan for Redbank Reserve, Picton.

·        This report recommends that:

o   The Master Plan for Redbank Reserve be adopted and hence be available for appropriate grant opportunities, Voluntary Planning Agreement negotiations and annual budgetary considerations.

o   That all participants in the engagement process be thanked for their contributions.

Report

As part of the implementation of a master plan priority list for Council parks and reserves, a master planning process was undertaken for Redbank Reserve, Picton. The focus for the master plan was to identify opportunities to embellish the existing open space to facilitate increased use of the Reserve.

Redbank Reserve is a local level park located in the southern area of Picton, on the corner of Bridge Street and Argyle Street. The primary function of the space is passive use and the existing infrastructure is limited to boundary fencing and scattered trees.

Being situated on the main road connecting Picton and Tahmoor, and in close proximity to the Wollondilly Community Leisure Centre (WCLC), Picton High School and the industrial area of Picton, there is a great opportunity to develop an attractive park that increases opportunities for passive recreation.

There is a wide range of potential park users that fall within a 400 metre walking radius from the park including local residents, workers from the Bridge Street and Henry Street industrial areas, high school students and parents and children visiting the WCLC.

Additionally, Council’s adopted Open Space, Recreation & Community Facilities Strategy (2014) identifies a need to increase the outdoor recreational space associated with the WCLC; however, the land surrounding the Leisure Centre is very limited. Although Redbank Reserve is located across the road, it offers a suitable space to help address this identified need.

In November 2018, Council undertook a process of community engagement to ascertain the community’s vision for the site based on a draft concept plan (Attachment 1 Community Engagement Report Redbank Reserve Master Plan). The feedback that was received during the engagement period was supportive of the proposed plan and the key suggestions that arose included:

·    retain as many trees as possible;

·    install a water station; and

·    include connecting pathways to the park.

 

Each of these items have been included in the proposed final master plan which proposes new infrastructure such as:

·    formalised off street parking area (included disabled parking spaces)

·    an amenities facility

·    off-leash dog exercise areas

·    outdoor exercise equipment

·    children’s playground equipment

·    new fencing

·    park seating areas.

Additional feedback on the draft master plan was sought from Council’s Companion Animals Advisory Committee in relation to the proposed off-leash dog exercise area. The off-leash area at this reserve was well supported and a lot of useful feedback was provided including dividing the space into two areas to cater for small and large dog breeds.

As the master plan developed, the concept of creating an outdoor study space evolved noting that a lot of young people walk from the Picton High School to Picton Town Centre during their free periods for something to do. An outdoor study space featuring various seating options, shade, wi-fi connectivity and mobile/laptop charging points will make this park something unique to the area. The focus on creating an outdoor study space at this reserve will also help Council in achieving the vision of the adopted Wollondilly Smart Shire Strategy.

It will also cater to the workers in the surrounding industrial estate by offering a park setting to easily walk to during their lunch breaks.

Council has already been approached by local groups who are interested in raising funds to help implement some of the park embellishments.

In summary, the proposed master plan for Redbank Reserve (Attachment 2) offers a clear vision for this current area of underutilised open space and its implementation will help to address an existing service provision gap that is being experienced in the southern area of Picton.

Consultation

A process of community engagement was undertaken on a draft concept plan for Redbank Reserve from 31 October 2018 to 30 November 2018. Following this, the master plan was amended accordingly and subsequent feedback sought from Council’s Companion Animals Advisory Committee.

Attachment 1 provides a breakdown of the feedback that was received during the community engagement period.

Financial Implications

An Opinion of Probable Costs estimates the implementation of the master plan at 2020 $1,615,917 (excluding GST) if all stages are undertaken at the one time and includes a contingency allowance of 20%.

However, the master plan is a 10 year vision for the site and can be undertaken in stages according to available budget.

It is recommended that Council work with the interested community groups to help realise each stage of implementation, with the assistance of funds from future Developer Contributions, Voluntary Planning Agreements and relevant grant opportunities.

Attachments

1.       Community Engagement Report Redbank Reserve Master Plan  

2.       Master Plan for Redbank Reserve  

3.       Montage of Master Plan for Redbank Reserve   

Recommendation

1.       That the Master Plan for Redbank Reserve be adopted and hence be available for appropriate grant opportunities, Voluntary Planning Agreement negotiations and annual budgetary considerations.

2.       That all participants in the engagement process be thanked for their contributions.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

12.4       Amendment to Douglas Park Sportsground Master Plan

File Number:           10619-2#46

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s consideration to amend the 2016 adopted Master Plan for Douglas Park Sportsground to allow for the installation of a permanent shade structure over the existing terraced seating area.

·        It is recommended that:

o   Council undertake a process of community consultation on the proposal to install a permanent shade structure over the terraced seating area at Douglas Park Sportsground.

o   Should the outcome of the community consultation process be favourable, Council delegate authority to the Chief Executive Officer to amend the Douglas Park Sportsground Master Plan, with the legend to state ‘10. Seating terraces extended and hard surfaces added on terraces, with a permanent shade structure provided’.

o   Subject to Recommendations 1 and 2:

§  The Douglas Park Sportsground 355 Management Committee be notified of the Master Plan amendment;

§  Council work with the Committee to navigate through the required environmental approval process for the proposed permanent shade structure; and

§  The Committee be thanked for their efforts towards delivering improvements to the recreation facilities at Douglas Park Sportsground.

Report

Following a process of community engagement, Council adopted the Master Plan for Douglas Park Sportsground in August 2016 (Attachment 1) as a way to proactively plan for new and improved sport and recreation facilities.

Since the adoption of the Master Plan, a number of facility improvements have been completed including:

·    the construction of a multi-purpose storage facility;

·    the installation of a shared pathway circuit surrounding the sportsfield;

·    the installation of an awning extending from the tennis clubhouse facility; and

·    terracing between the community centre and sportsfield for spectator seating.

The completion of these projects has been the result of the efforts of the 355 Management Committee, the sporting user groups and Council each securing various funding to undertake the works.

Master Plans are key to providing a clear vision for the future of a particular location and they help Council to identify and secure budget, prioritise work and communicate with stakeholders. Various requests from user groups are reviewed against adopted Master Plans, where available, to ensure consistency. Where proposals are of merit, however are not identified on an adopted Master Plan, Council may amend the Master Plan by way of resolution.

The Douglas Park Sportsground 355 Management Committee have expressed a desire to install a hardstand shelter over the terracing area to provide shelter from the elements for sporting spectators. Given that the adopted Master Plan identifies ‘trees and canopy’ as the means for providing shade over the terraced area, their request requires a minor amendment to the adopted Master Plan.

The proposed hardstand shelter (e.g. steel structure) is considered to be of merit as it will provide spectators with shade and rain protection immediately, as opposed to planting trees. Therefore, it is recommended that Council undertake a process of community consultation on the proposal with the view of making an amendment to the adopted Master Plan to facilitate this request.

Should the community consultation be favourable, Council will work with the Committee to navigate through the required approvals process noting that such structures are likely to require structural engineering plans, consideration of rainwater runoff and collection, as well as electrical/lighting details.

Consultation

A process of community engagement was undertaken in late 2015 and mid-2016 to develop the adopted Master Plan. This included focus group workshops with the 355 Management Committee and wider community consultation.

The proposed amendment is supported by the 355 Management Committee for the Douglas Park Sportsground.

This report proposes to undertake a process of community consultation in relation to the permanent shade structure, seeking feedback over a 14 day period.

Financial Implications

This matter will have an ongoing operation and maintenance financial impact on Council’s forward estimates. The Douglas Park Sportsground 355 Management Committee have indicated that they will be sourcing the required capital funding that is required for the installation of the proposed permanent shade structure. Subject to detailed design Council envisages this would be at least $100,000, however, could possibly be as high as $150,000 depending on structural requirements and lighting.

The ongoing operation and maintenance liability will fall with Council. Also subject to detailed design and assessments of depreciation, the ongoing maintenance and operating cost would be in the order of $4,000 to $7,000pa.

Attachments

1.       Adopted Master Plan for Douglas Park Sportsground 2016   

Recommendation

1.       That Council undertake a process of community consultation on the proposal to install a permanent shade structure over the terraced seating area at Douglas Park Sportsground.

2.       That should the outcome of the community consultation process be favourable, Council delegate authority to the Chief Executive Officer to amend the Douglas Park Sportsground Master Plan, with the legend to state ‘10. Seating terraces extended and hard surfaces added on terraces, with a permanent shade structure provided’.

3.       That subject to Recommendations 1 and 2:

i.     The Douglas Park Sportsground 355 Management Committee be notified of the Master Plan amendment;

ii.     Council work with the Committee to navigate through the required environmental approval process for the proposed permanent shade structure; and

iii.    The Committee be thanked for their efforts towards delivering improvements to the recreation facilities at Douglas Park Sportsground.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

12.5       Funding Strategy for the Master Plan for the Old Menangle School Site

File Number:           10619-2#47

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to provide information on how Council will deliver the adopted Master Plan for the Old Menangle School Site.

·        It is recommended that

o   The delivery of the Old Menangle School Master Plan be undertaken in stages as identified in the funding strategy as proposed in this report, subject to the annual budgeting process.

o   Council seek relevant funding opportunities to expedite the Master Plan’s delivery as they become available.

Report

At its meeting on 21 October 2019, a number of resolutions were made in relation to the adoption of the Master Plan for the Old Menangle School Site, including:

‘That a report come to council in December 2019 outlining a funding strategy for the delivery of the Master Plan components, suitable for consideration in the annual budgeting process’.

Council notes the delayed report is due to other urgent priorities that arose.

The funding options have been considered and it is proposed that Council deliver the Master Plan components as outlined in the Financial Implications section of this report.

Consultation

The adopted Master Plan for the Old Menangle School Site was developed following a process of community consultation.

Internal consultation with the relevant Council officers has occurred in relation to this report to determine appropriate funding options for the Master Plan’s delivery, including Council’s Developer Contributions Planning Coordinator.

Financial Implications

An Opinion of Probable Costs estimates the implementation of the master plan at $2,159,365 * (excluding GST) in 2020 dollars. This excludes the costs associated with the restoration of the Old School Building itself which will be subject to a separate detailed design investigation.

Given that the Master Plan is a 10 to 15 year vision for the site, its implementation can be undertaken in stages according to available budget as identified in the table on the following page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed Funding Strategy for Old Menangle School Site Master Plan

 

Estimated Cost

Funding Source

Confirmed

Stage 1 (2019/20)

Tree and vegetation removal

$       15,000.00

S94 (2011)

Yes

Pathways and associated earthworks

$    380,000.00

S94 (2011) and Durham Green contribution

Yes

Fitness equipment

$    150,000.00

Liveability Grant

Yes

Stage 2 (for consideration for 2020/21)

Renewal of amenities

$    150,000.00

Buildings Renew

Yes

Car park

$    220,000.00

Development Contribution
and/or grant

No

Stage 3 (for consideration 2021/22)

Old School Building refurbishment

To be confirmed following EOI.

Development Contribution
and/or grant

No

Park furniture

$    160,000.00

Development Contribution
and/or grant

No

Landscaping and other structures around building

$    500,000.00

Development Contribution
and/or grant

No

Stage 4 (independent of other stages)

Playground

$    250,000.00

Development Contribution
and/or grant

No

Stage 5

Remaining earthworks and landscaping

$    334,000.00

Development Contribution
and/or grant

No

Total

   $ 2,159,000.00 *

 

* Excluding cost escalation for phased implementation as the construction program is not known at this time.

Attachments

Nil

Recommendation

1.       That the delivery of the Old Menangle School Master Plan be undertaken in stages as identified in the funding strategy as proposed in this report, subject to the annual budgeting process.

2.       That Council seek relevant funding opportunities to expedite the Master Plan’s delivery as they become available.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

13          Caring for the Environment

13.1       Tree Management Policy

File Number:           10619-2#40

 

Executive Summary

·        This report is for adoption of the Tree Management Policy 2020 as amended following public exhibition.

·        This new policy will supersede a variety of existing tree management related documents that are old and not well integrated with each other.

·        This report recommends that Council adopt the Draft Tree Management Policy.

Report

Trees and large vegetation deliver significant environmental, economic and social benefits to the community.

The Tree Management Policy (TMP) was developed to as a part of effective management of trees and large vegetation, support the management and support the broader environment as well as addressing community concerns regarding tree management impacts on dwellings and the local environment and infrastructure.

The policy’s eight objectives align with five of the Community Strategic Plan’s Caring for the Environment themes. Facilitating responsible public and private tree management is an Operational Plan/Delivery Program action.

The size of the TMP is reflective of the many tree management issues in the community and the different rural and non-rural zones and activities throughout the Shire. The policy deals with trees on public (Council owned and managed lands) and tree removal on private lands. It details Council expectations and the required considerations for tree and vegetation management.

The Draft TMP was placed on Public Exhibition following the 16 September 2019 Council Meeting. Twelve written submissions and one verbal submission were received. The public response was generally positive. A number of specific improvement suggestions were received. Without substantially changing the Draft TMP, those relevant to the scope of the policy have been incorporated in the amended policy.

Once the policy is adopted, staff will develop Fact Sheets referenced back to the policy to provide developers and residents with more detail on local tree management issues.

The TMP is informed by the legislative framework and integrates with the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 (DCP).  The legislative framework is currently changing and the transitional arrangements for transition from the Threatened Species and Native Vegetation Acts to the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 and the Biodiversity Offsets Scheme are currently being removed and the revision of the DCP is programmed for adoption in later the 2020 calendar year.  As a result, the TMP may require minor amendments for required cross referencing and process mapping.  Required changes to the TMP will be the subject of a future report to council.

Consultation

The Draft TMP was the subject of consultation with a range of council sections; Council’s Minerals, Energy Resources, Environment & Waste Advisory Committee; and has been on Public Exhibition including a “Your Say Feedback” interactive web page. 

Twelve submissions were received and Save Sydney’s Trees met with the Mayor and Deputy Mayor to discuss the draft Policy.

 

As a consequence of the comments and further internal review some formatting and minor grammatical amendments were made as well as moving some sections of the document around to improve customer clarity; however, the content has not been altered – see attachment 2 for a tracked changed version of the draft Policy setting out the improvements.

Financial Implications

The Policy has financial implications for people undertaking tree and vegetation removal on private land. These costs are identified in Councils adopted Fees & Charges and is updated annually with Councils budget.

Attachments

1.       Draft Tree Management Policy 2020 for adoption  

2.       Draft Tree Management Policy 2020 - track changes from exhibited draft Policy 2019   

Recommendation

That Council adopt the attached Tree Management Policy.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

14          Looking after the Community

14.1       Financial Assistance: Donations and Sponsorship

File Number:           10619#1004

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to inform of applications for donations and sponsorship received by Council in the period December/January 2019/20.

·        It is recommended that a $1000 Sponsorship grant be provided to the Douglas Park Community Sportsground 355 Committee towards an Open Day to support the Douglas Park RFS.

Report

In January 2020 Council received one application for Sponsorship:

·    Application for $1000 sponsorship from Douglas Park Community Sportsground 355 Committee towards an Open Day to support the Douglas Park RFS.

Consultation

The application has been assessed against the criteria in Council’s Financial Assistance Framework and is eligible to receive funding through the Sponsorship Program.

Financial Implications

The request is able to be funded within the current financial year budget allocation for Sponsorship.

Annual Budget

Current Expenditure

Balance Available

$10,000

$8,000

$2,000

 

Attachments

Nil

Recommendation

That a $1000 Sponsorship grant be provided by Council to the Douglas Park Community Sportsground 355 Committee towards an Open Day to support the Douglas Park RFS.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

15          Efficient and Effective Council

15.1       Adoption of Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy

File Number:           10619#909

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to adopt the Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy.

·        The public exhibition period for the Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy has closed and Council received three submissions from the Community about the policy.

·        It is recommended that Council adopt the Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy.

Report

The Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy sets out a framework for the use of Council’s drone technology. The policy has been developed to ensure that safety, privacy and legislative compliance requirements are considered and met Council. There are a number of positive benefits of using Drone technology including greater efficiency of Council operations and staff safety. 

Council resolved to place the policy on public exhibition in the Ordinary Council Meeting on 16 September 2019.

The Drone Policy was publicly exhibited with three external submissions being received by Council and internal feedback from Council staff.

The following community concerns were received in the public exhibition period:

1)   Privacy

 

2)   Use of Council Resources

 

Assessment of community concerns

1)   Council adheres to the requirements of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (PIPP Act). Council is collecting or recording data only for a specific purpose in support of a Council function.

·            

·           Any and all data collected or recorded by RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System), including geospatial data, is owned by Council and subject to the PIPP Act and Council’s Privacy Management Plan. Recordings are subject to the legislated Information Privacy Principles that determine the storage and retention of data.

2)   RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) will increase the efficiency of Council’s corporate and operational activity within the Shire, particularly where physical access by Council officers to certain locations is restricted by factors such as distance, danger or difficult terrain. RPAS saves costs and reduces risks with the use of a machine to perform tasks usually performed by staff.

A response letter has been sent to the three residents who raised concerns regarding the Policy.

The following suggestion was received from Council staff:

1)   CASA (Civil Aviation Safety Authority) look after recreational drone operation while Council manage commercial flight involving Council approved public events.

Assessment of feedback from Council staff

1)   The wording “or recreational” has been removed from Section 4.6.2 of the Policy.

 

Consultation

After the Policy has been adopted by Council, Council’s Chief Remote Pilot will conduct training sessions for Council staff and an information session for the public to ensure the effective implementation of the Policy. The Chief Remote Pilot will also make available the RPAS Operational Manual and Procedure to Council staff.

Financial Implications

Funding has been allocated and is available under the 2019/2020 Operational Budget.

Attachments

1.       Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy   

Recommendation

That Council adopt the Drone (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) Policy.

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

15.2       Delegation of Functions of Council to the Chief Executive Officer

File Number:           10619#954

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to provide a revised Chief Executive Officer’s Instrument of Delegation which gives clarity to the excluded delegations and better reflects the Local Government Act 1993 provisions.

 

·        It is recommended that Council adopt the revised Instrument of Delegation and delegate to the Chief Executive Officer the exercise of Council's powers, functions, duties and authorities contained in legislation subject to the exclusions specified in the Instrument of Delegation.

Report

 

The role of Council as the governing body

 

The Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) sets out the role of the governing body of Council in section 223 as follows:

 

(1) The role of the governing body is as follows:

 

(a)     to direct and control the affairs of the council in accordance with this Act,

(b)     to provide effective civic leadership to the local community,

(c)     to ensure as far as possible the financial sustainability of the council,

(d)     to ensure as far as possible that the council acts in accordance with the principles set out in Chapter 3 and the plans, programs, strategies and polices of the council,

(e)     to develop and endorse the community strategic plan, delivery program and other strategic plans, programs, strategies and policies of the council,

(f)      to determine and adopt a rating and revenue policy and operational plans that support the optimal allocation of the council's resources to implement the strategic plans (including the community strategic plan) of the council and for the benefit of the local area,

(g)     to keep under review the performance of the council, including service delivery,

(h)     to make decisions necessary for the proper exercise of the council's regulatory functions,

(i)      to determine the process for appointment of the general manager by the council and to monitor the general manager's performance,

(j)      to determine the senior staff positions within the organisation structure of the council,

(k)     to consult regularly with community organisations and other key stakeholders and keep them informed of the council's decisions and activities,

(l)      to be responsible for ensuring that the council acts honestly, efficiently and appropriately.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Functions of the Chief Executive Officer (General Manager)

 

Section 335 of the Act outlines the functions of the General Manager (CEO). The CEO is generally responsible for the effective and efficient operation of the Council and for ensuring the implementation, without undue delay, of decisions of the council. Section 335 of the Act outlines the function as follows:

The general manager of a council has the following functions:

(a)     to conduct the day-to-day management of the council in accordance with the strategic plans, programs, strategies and policies of the council,

(b)     to implement, without undue delay, lawful decisions of the council,

(c)     to advise the mayor and the governing body on the development and implementation of the strategic plans, programs, strategies and policies of the council,

(d)     to advise the mayor and the governing body on the appropriate form of community consultation on the strategic plans, programs, strategies and policies of the council and other matters related to the council,

(e)     to prepare, in consultation with the mayor and the governing body, the council's community strategic plan, community engagement strategy, resourcing strategy, delivery program, operational plan and annual report,

(f)      to ensure that the mayor and other councillors are given timely information and advice and the administrative and professional support necessary to effectively discharge their functions,

(g)     to exercise any of the functions of the council that are delegated by the council to the general manager,

(h)     to appoint staff in accordance with the organisation structure determined under this Chapter and the resources approved by the council,

(i)      to direct and dismiss staff,

(j)      to implement the council's workforce management strategy,

(k)     any other functions that are conferred or imposed on the general manager by or under this or any other Act.

 

Certain functions to be exercised only by resolution of the council

 

Section 377 of the Act enables Council to delegate to its Chief Executive Officer, or any other person or body, functions of the Council excepting those functions specified in sections 377(1)(a) – (u). Section 377 provides:

 

377 General power of the council to delegate

 

(1) A council may, by resolution, delegate to the general manager or any other person or body (not including another employee of the council) any of the functions of the council under this or any other Act, other than the following:

(a)     the appointment of a general manager,

(b)     the making of a rate,

(c)     a determination under section 549 as to the levying of a rate,

(d)     the making of a charge,

(e)     the fixing of a fee,

(f)      the borrowing of money,

(g)     the voting of money for expenditure on its works, services or operations,

(h)     the compulsory acquisition, purchase, sale, exchange or surrender of any land or other property (but not including the sale of items of plant or equipment),

(i)      the acceptance of tenders to provide services currently provided by members of staff of the council,

(j)      the adoption of an operational plan under section 405,

(k)     the adoption of a financial statement included in an annual financial report,

(l)      a decision to classify or reclassify public land under Division 1 of Part 2 of Chapter 6,

(m)    the fixing of an amount or rate for the carrying out by the council of work on private land,

(n)     the decision to carry out work on private land for an amount that is less than the amount or rate fixed by the council for the carrying out of any such work,

(o)     the review of a determination made by the council, and not by a delegate of the council, of an application for approval or an application that may be reviewed under section 82A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 ,

(p)     the power of the council to authorise the use of reasonable force for the purpose of gaining entry to premises under section 194,

(q)     a decision under section 356 to contribute money or otherwise grant financial assistance to persons,

(r)      a decision under section 234 to grant leave of absence to the holder of a civic office,

(s)     the making of an application, or the giving of a notice, to the Governor or Minister,

(t)      this power of delegation,

(u)     any function under this or any other Act that is expressly required to be exercised by resolution of the council.

(1A) Despite subsection (1), a council may delegate its functions relating to the granting of financial assistance if:

(a) the financial assistance is part of a specified program, and

(b) the program is included in the council’s draft operational plan for the year in which the financial assistance is proposed to be given, and

(c) the program’s proposed budget for that year does not exceed 5 per cent of the council’s proposed income from the ordinary rates levied for that year, and

(d) the program applies uniformly to all persons within the council’s area or to a significant proportion of all the persons within the council’s area.

(2) A council may, by resolution, sub-delegate to the general manager or any other person or body (not including another employee of the council) any function delegated to the council by the Departmental Chief Executive except as provided by the instrument of delegation to the council.

 

 

 

 

Review of delegations

 

Council approved the current delegations to the CEO on 16 September 2019. Following commencement of the CEO, the delegations were reviewed to ensure clarity and alignment with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993. The new proposed delegation is attached.

 

The reviewed delegation is proposed to commence on 18 February 2020 and remains in force until specifically altered or revoked.

Consultation

Manager Governance, General Counsel and Assistant Director People, Legal & Governance

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

 

Attachments

1.       Draft Instrument of Delegation to the Chief Executive Officer   

Recommendation

That Council adopt the revised Instrument of Delegation and delegate to the Chief Executive Officer the exercise of Council's powers, functions, duties and authorities contained in legislation subject to the exclusions specified in the Instrument of Delegation.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

15.3       Classification of Council Managed Crown Land as Operational Status

File Number:           10619#1005

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek endorsement for an application to the Minister Administering the Crown Lands Management Act 2016 to classify the reserves contained in the attached Schedule (CM Ref: 4289 & 11597)  to Minister to Classify Crown Land as Operational Land in order that the current and intended uses can continue.

This report recommends that Council requests approval from the Minister Administering the Crown Lands Management Act 2016 to classify 10 locations covering 16 lots or part lots of land as Operational Land to be administered under the Local Government Act 1993.

Report

The Crown Land Management Act 2016 (CLMA) was enacted on 1 July 2018. This Act authorises Council as appointed Crown Land Manager to manage Crown Land as if it were public land under the Local Government Act 1993.

Under the CLMA, Council must assign to all Crown Land under its management a classification of either “operational” or “community” in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993.

The current and historical use of a number of parcels of Council managed Crown Land are inconsistent with the categories of Community Land provided in the Local Government Act 1993.

Council staff have identified Crown Land 10 locations, 16 lots or part lots, which require classification as operational in accordance with Crown Land guidelines and will seek ministerial consent to classify the land as if it were operational land.

Background

The CLMA provides that Crown Land managed by Council must be managed as if it were Community Land unless the Minister administering has given written consent to classify the land as operational.

The onus is on Council as Crown Land Manager to identify and satisfy the Minister that certain land under management does not fall within any of the categories of Community Land under the Local Government Act 1993 or could not continue with the current use if it was required to be used as Community Land.

Council staff have considered each Crown Land reserve managed by Council and have identified those reserves which should be classified as operational land and recorded the justification in the format required by the Department of Industry - Crown Lands, shown in attached Schedule.

The Department of Industry - Crown Lands will consider Council’s application on its merits and will notify Council in writing of the outcome once ministerial consent has been given or refused.

Discussion

In deciding which land should be made operational Council staff considered the historical, current and proposed uses of each reserve and the reserve purpose in accordance with the Department of Industry - Crown Lands and the Office of Local Government guidelines and advice.

Generally, this is land that may not need to be made available to the public at large because the nature of the land is operational and where the use of the land may require partial or complete exclusion of the public for safety or operational reasons.

Other examples of Crown Land that may not fall within categories of Community Land would include cemeteries and other land where the length of existing tenure does not fall within the legislative requirements of the Local Government Act 1993.

Council managed Crown Land that does not meet an operational need will not be approved for this classification by the Minister.

Risk

If Council does not complete the classification of its managed Crown Land in the manner prescribed by the Department of Industry - Crown Lands, it may not be able to use the land for its current or intended purposes.

Consultation

General Counsel

Office of Local Government

Department of Industry - Crown Lands

Financial Implications

There are no direct financial implications for the recommended reclassification process.

Should the reclassification process not proceed, or not be approved by the Minister, there are potential additional operational and acquisition costs if current or proposed land uses must cease and other locations sourced and developed to allow the activity to continue. These will be the subject of a future report to council if required.

Attachments

1.       Classification of Crown Land as Operational Land   

Recommendation

That Council approves the submission of an application requesting the approval from the Minister Administering the Crown Lands Management Act 2016 to classify the following parcels as Operational for administration under the Local Government Act 1993:

·    27 Anthony Road, Bargo (Lot 242 DP751250);

·    22 Oaks Street, Thirlmere (Part Lot 7022 DP 92820);

·    157-187 Menangle Street Picton (Part Lot 7005 DP 92838);

·    59 Almond Street, Wilton (Lot 7005 DP 1058621);

·    90 Station Street Cnr Leonard Thirlmere (Lots 7026 & 7027 DP 92833);

·    300 Pheasants Nest Road, Pheasants Nest (Lot 7302 DP 1127119);

·    195 Camden Road, Douglas Park (Part Lot 1 DP 436803);

·    15 Great Southern Road, Bargo (Lot 7013 DP 93010);

·    Picton Cemetery Dunlop Place, Picton (Lot 5 Sec 9 DP 758843, Lot 3 DP 821375, Lot 7004 DP 92993, Lot 7304 DP 1161615, Lot 2 DP821375 and Lot 7007 DP 1122944); and

·    125 Bargo River Road at Waratah Place (Reserve R1016410),Tahmoor (Lot 7307 DP 1138562).

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

15.4       Investment of Funds as at 30 November 2019 and 31 December 2019

File Number:           10619-2#27

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to provide details of Council’s invested funds as at 30 November 2019 and 31 December 2019.

·        It is recommended that the information and certification in relation to the investment of funds as at 30 November 2019 and 31 December 2019 be noted.

Report

At its last meeting, the Reserve Bank reduced the cash rate to 0.75%. In relation to the domestic market, the Board of the Reserve Bank commented that:

After a soft patch in the second half of last year, the Australian economy appears to have reached a gentle turning point. The central scenario is for growth to pick up gradually to around 3 per cent in 2021. The low level of interest rates, recent tax cuts, ongoing spending on infrastructure, the upswing in housing prices and a brighter outlook for the resources sector should all support growth. The main domestic uncertainty continues to be the outlook for consumption, with the sustained period of only modest increases in household disposable income continuing to weigh on consumer spending. Other sources of uncertainty include the effects of the drought and the evolution of the housing construction cycle.

The unemployment rate has been steady at around 5¼ per cent over recent months. It is expected to remain around this level for some time, before gradually declining to a little below 5 per cent in 2021. Wages growth is subdued and is expected to remain at around its current rate for some time yet. A further gradual lift in wages growth would be a welcome development and is needed for inflation to be sustainably within the 2–3 per cent target range. Taken together, recent outcomes suggest that the Australian economy can sustain lower rates of unemployment and underemployment.

Inflation is expected to pick up, but to do so only gradually. In both headline and underlying terms, inflation is expected to be close to 2 per cent in 2020 and 2021.

There are further signs of a turnaround in established housing markets. This is especially so in Sydney and Melbourne, but prices in some other markets have also increased recently. In contrast, new dwelling activity is still declining and growth in housing credit remains low. Demand for credit by investors is subdued and credit conditions, especially for small and medium-sized businesses, remain tight. Mortgage rates are at record lows and there is strong competition for borrowers of high credit quality.

The easing of monetary policy this year is supporting employment and income growth in Australia and a return of inflation to the medium-term target range. The lower cash rate has put downward pressure on the exchange rate, which is supporting activity across a range of industries. It has also boosted asset prices, which in time should lead to increased spending, including on residential construction. Lower mortgage rates are also boosting aggregate household disposable income, which, in time, will boost household spending.

Given these effects of lower interest rates and the long and variable lags in the transmission of monetary policy, the Board decided to hold the cash rate steady at this meeting while it continues to monitor developments, including in the labour market. The Board also agreed that due to both global and domestic factors, it was reasonable to expect that an extended period of low interest rates will be required in Australia to reach full employment and achieve the inflation target. The Board is prepared to ease monetary policy further if needed to support sustainable growth in the economy, full employment and the achievement of the inflation target over time.”

The majority of Council’s investment portfolio (97%) is invested in deposits / securities with Australian Authorised Deposit taking Institutions (ADI’s).  Council has been taking advantage of term deposit “specials” from various institutions without overexposing the portfolio to any one institution. Note that the marked to market valuations on some of the direct investment products in Council’s portfolio remain at less than the face value of the investment.  The marked to market value of these investments is expected to be equal to or greater than the face value by the time they reach their maturity date.  Early exit from these products would realise losses.

 

The following chart compares Council’s portfolio yield with the benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index rate in each month for 2018/19 and 2019/20.

 

 

 

As shown in the chart above, Council’s portfolio yield has continually exceeded the benchmark AusBond 3 month Bank Bill Index due to the prudent investment of Council’s portfolio.

 

Under Reg 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, Council’s Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council each month with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Act.

 

Council’s investment portfolio as at 30 November 2019 is summarised below.

 

 

Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 December 2019 is summarised below.

 

Details of Council’s investment portfolio as at 30 November 2019 are provided in attachment 1 and details of Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 December are provided in attachment 2.

 

Consultation

Independent advice regarding the investment of Council funds was provided by Prudential Investment Services Corp.

Financial Implications

Council continues to invest those funds which, having regard to Council’s Resourcing Strategy 2017/18 – 2020/21 and adopted Operational Plan 2019/20, are not required to manage Council’s day-to-day cash flow or have been identified as required to fund specific future projects and expenditure or anticipated (budgeted) future commitments.

Interest earned is allocated to restricted cash and income in accordance with Council’s adopted budget, policy and legislative requirements. Accrued interest to 30 November 2019 was $541,365 and accrued interest to 31 December 2019 was $525,661. The chart below compares actual interest received to date with budgeted interest for the year.

 

The Reserve Bank of Australia has continued to keep interest rates low and the expected investment income will be reviewed and revised as more information becomes available.

Certification

I hereby certify that Council’s investments have been made in accordance with Sec 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General Regulations) 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Clair Hardy

Chief Financial Officer

WOLLONDILLY SHIRE COUNCIL

 

Attachments

1.       November  2019- Investment Summary Report  

2.       December 2019- Investment Summary Report   

Recommendation

That the information and certification in relation to the investment of Council funds as at 30 November 2019 and 31 December 2019 be noted.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

15.5       Delivery and Operational Plan Progress Report

File Number:           10619-2#29

 

Executive Summary

·        The purpose of this report is to provide Council with a progress update on the current Delivery and Operational Plan.

·        It is recommended that the attached progress report be received and noted.

Report

The Integrated Planning and Reporting legislation required that a report on the progress of the Delivery and Operational plan be completed.  The report is to be provided under separate cover before the Meeting.

Attachments

1.       Delivery and Operational Plan Progress Report (to be provided)  

Recommendation

That the attached Delivery and Operational Plan Progress Report be received and noted.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

16          Notice of Motion/Rescissions

16.1       Notice of Motion - Brimstone (Oakdale) Emergency Response Staging Area and Air Base

File Number:           10619-2#51

 

I, Councillor Blair Briggs, intend to move the following motion:

 

CEO’s Comment

The liaison process can be undertaken within existing budget allocations.

 

 

Attachments

Nil

Motion

That Council work with the lead agencies to ensure Brimstone (Oakdale) can be established as an operational base for emergency response.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

16.2       Notice of Motion - Vegetation Clearing around Residences

File Number:           10619-2#52

 

I, Councillor Judith Hannan, intend to move the following motion:

 

CEO’s Comment

 

This Notice of Motion, if approved, can be progressed within existing resources.

 

Attachments

Nil

Motion

That Council organise a meeting with National Parks and Sydney Water to advocate for residents to be able to clear vegetation directly surrounding their houses.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

16.3       Notice of Motion - Solar Panels in New Dwellings

File Number:           10619-2#57

 

I, Councillor Robert Khan, intend to move the following motion:

 

CEO’s Comment

 

This motion can be implemented within existing resources.

 

Attachments

Nil

Motion

That a report be prepared for Council for the May 2020 Ordinary Meeting on strategies to encourage more solar panels to be installed on new dwellings within the Shire.

    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

17          Closed Reports  

Recommendation

1.         That Council considers the confidential report(s) listed below in a meeting closed to the public in accordance with Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993:

17.1       Lease - Waste Management Facility - Wonga Road, Picton

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(c) and (d)(i) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

Information within the report contains commercial information and if disclosed would disadvantage the parties entering into the negotiations.

17.2       Proposed Acquisition - Lot 252 DP 257510 - 25 Government Road, Bargo

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

The negotiations for acquiring land may disadvantage Council's commercial position if disclosed.

17.3       Proposed Acquisition - Part Lots 6 & 10 DP 1057352  - 85-91 Argyle Street, Picton

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(c) and (d)(i) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

Negotiations for the acquisition of the property would prejudice Council during negotiations if released.

2.         That pursuant to Section 10A(1) of the Local Government Act 1993, the media and public be excluded from the meeting on the basis that the business to be considered is classified confidential under the provisions of Section 10A(2).

 

3.         That the correspondence and reports relevant to the subject business be withheld from access to the media and public as required by Section 11(2) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

18 February 2020

 

18          Questions for Next Meeting

No reports this meeting