You are invited to attend the next Ordinary Meeting of Council:

 

Date:

Tuesday, 19 May 2020

Time:

6.30pm

Location:

Council meeting to be held remotely using audio visual link and is open to members of the community via webcast.

 

AGENDA

 

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

19 May 2020

 

 

 

Ben Taylor

Chief Executive Officer


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

Order Of Business

1         Opening. 4

2         Recording of the Meeting. 4

3         Webcast Notice. 4

4         National Anthem.. 4

5         Acknowledgement of Country. 4

6         Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests. 4

7         Declaration of Interest 4

8         Confirmation of Minutes. 4

9         Items to be Tabled. 4

10       Mayoral Minute. 5

10.1         Mayoral Minute. 5

11       Sustainable and Balanced Growth. 6

11.1         Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee - March 2020 Meeting Minutes. 6

11.2         Wollondilly Contributions Plan. 8

11.3         Proposed Water Symposium.. 22

11.4         Solar Panels in New Dwellings and Council assets. 24

12       Management and Provision of Infrastructure. 30

12.1         Tender for Management & Operation of Warragamba Swimming Pool 30

12.2         Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct - Status Update. 32

12.3         Traffic Management Upgrades - April 2020. 39

13       Caring for the Environment 41

No reports this meeting

14       Looking after the Community. 42

14.1         Wollondilly Health Alliance Progress Report 42

14.2         Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy. 43

15       Efficient and Effective Council 45

15.1         Community Forum Guidelines Review.. 45

15.2         Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2020. 47

15.3         Investment of Funds as at 31 March 2020. 49

16       Notice of Motion/Rescissions. 53

No reports this meeting

17       Closed Reports. 53

No reports this meeting

18       Questions for Next Meeting. 53

No reports this meeting

 


1          Opening

2          Recording of the Meeting

In accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice the electronic recording of the Council Meeting and the use of electronic media during the proceedings is not permitted. This includes devices such as laptops, mobile phones, tape recorders and video cameras.

3          Webcast Notice

Members of the public are advised, in accordance with Section 18 of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (PPIPA), that Wollondilly Shire Council records and webcasts live all Ordinary and Extraordinary Meetings of Council held in open session for the purpose of facilitating community access. The webcasts are publically available for viewing on Council’s website.

Video footage collected is of the decision making body only.

The webcasts and webcast recordings are protected by copyright and owned by Council. No part of the proceedings of a meeting of the Council may be recorded, copied or made available to others by members of the public without the authority of the Council.

Council may be required to disclose recordings pursuant to the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

4          National Anthem

5          Acknowledgement of Country

The Mayor will acknowledge the traditional Custodians of the Land.

6          Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests

7          Declaration of Interest

8          Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting - 21 April 2020

9          Items to be Tabled

               Disclosure of Interests Register – 2019/20


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

10        Mayoral Minute

10.1       Mayoral Minute

File Number:           10619-2#216

 

Recommendation

That the Mayoral Minute be accepted.

 

 

The Mayor may put to a meeting (without notice) any matter the Council is allowed to deal with or which the Council officially knows about.

 

Attachments

Nil  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

11        Sustainable and Balanced Growth

11.1       Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee - March 2020 Meeting Minutes

File Number:           10619-2#126

 

Executive Summary

The Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee is a Committee established by Council consisting of members representing rural landowners. The Committee meets quarterly. The Committee’s purpose is to:

a)      Provide feedback on Planning Proposals and Development Applications which are likely to impact (positively or negatively) on agricultural production.

b)      Facilitate communication between industry and various levels of government. 

c)       Create and support opportunities and initiatives that will enhance agricultural production.

To ensure that the work of the Committee is brought to the attention of Council and the Wollondilly community, Committee minutes and recommendations will now be reported to Council.

The purpose of this report is to present the minutes and recommendation of the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee meeting held on date 4 March 2020.

Recommendation

That Council notes the following recommendations of the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee meeting of 4 March 2020:

1.       That Council requests the results of the October 2019 LGNSW Conference discussions regarding harvestable water use rights and share with the Committee.

2.       That Council writes to the NSW Water Minister seeking a review of harvestable water rights in the Water Management Act and consultation with stakeholders, with a view to an increase in water use limits for the coastal areas east of the Great Dividing Range known as the ‘Eastern Fall’.

3.       The Committee would like to formally acknowledge the work of the Australian Farming Institute (AFI) and thank Katie McRobert for her informed presentation.

 

The Committee notes:

a)      This is a very important piece of work to protect farmers’ rights and for future strategic planning; and

b)      The AFI is a valuable resource that can assist with policy decisions around farming land.

 

Report

Landholders can take water under basic landholder rights without a water licence or approval in certain circumstances.

There are three types of basic landholder rights in NSW under the Water Management Act 2000:

1.         Domestic and stock rights

2.         Harvestable rights

3.         Native title rights.

Under Harvestable Rights, owners or occupiers of land can collect a proportion of the rainfall run-off from the land in one or more dams without a water licence, water supply work approval, or water use approval.

Restrictions on the size of the dams and the location of the dams apply.

The water captured in a harvestable rights dam cannot be supplied to any other property.

The maximum harvestable right dam capacity (MHRDC) is the total dam capacity allowed under the harvestable right for a property and takes into account rainfall and variations in rainfall pattern. The Harvestable Rights Orders are published in the NSW Government Gazette.

 

If a landowner wants to construct a dam that is larger than the MHRDC, they need to licence the volume of water that exceeds the MHRDC. They also need to hold an approval for a dam which exceeds the MHRDC.

The Committee believes that these limits should be reviewed. Council officers are happy to support the recommendation to write to the NSW Water Minister to seek a review.

Financial Implications

The costs associated with Council’s Advisory Committees are covered within Council’s operational budget. The costs associated with implementing the recommendations can be absorbed within the current budget.

Attachments

1.       Minutes - Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee - 4 March 2020    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

11.2       Wollondilly Contributions Plan

File Number:           10619-2#133

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the outcome of the public exhibition of the Draft Wollondilly Contributions Plan and to recommend Council adopts the revised Plan.

The draft Plan was publicly exhibited from 18 December 2019 to 5 February 2020.  Five submissions (all relating to the Wilton Growth Area) were received. A number of changes have been made to the draft plan as a result of the submissions as follows:

·        Apportionment of cost of transport infrastructure in the Wilton Growth Area;

·        Clarification of administrative provisions;

·        Refinements to clarify the location, base rates and costs of certain open space and transport items in the Works Schedule;

·        Plan administration costs clarified to reflect current IPART practice; and

·        Clear display and annotation of work items in the maps.

The final contributions plan will be administered efficiently over the entire Shire but separated into two contributions areas being:

·    Area A: The Shire (excluding Wilton Growth Area); and

·    Area B: Wilton Growth Area.

The final draft Plan proposes to collect $427,370,938 in local infrastructure contributions over the life of the plan for both areas, consisting of $87,822,715 for the Shire, and $339,548,223 for the Wilton Growth Area. These values will be indexed.  The plan is currently below the threshold that requires IPART approval.

It is noted that on 15 April 2020, the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces announced a review of the contributions system (longer term reform), and announced some more immediate changes which are currently on public exhibition. A separate report will be provided to Council on that package. No direct impacts from the immediate changes have been identified that will impact this draft Plan.

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Adopts the Draft Wollondilly Contributions Plan with minor alterations following the consideration of submissions.

2.       Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to make any updates to the Contributions Rates as a result of changes to CPI before the plan comes into effect.

3.       Notifies the public of Council’s decision to adopt the Wollondilly Contributions Plan and that it commences on 1st July 2020.

4.       Publishes the adopted Plan on the NSW Planning Portal soon as practicable after adoption.

5.       Repeals Wollondilly Development Contributions Plans 1993, 2000, 2005 and 2010, as well as Wollondilly Contributions Plan 2011, upon Wollondilly Contributions Plan coming into effect, and reconciles the contributions reserve in accordance with Clause 5.1 of the Plan.

6.       Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to make minor amendments to the Wollondilly Contributions Plan in accordance with Clause 32(3) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and as set out in Clause 5.8 of the Plan.

 

Report

What is a Contributions Plan

The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, together with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 (the Regulation), Ministerial Directions, Planning Circulars, Practice Notes and IPART Guidelines, sets out the development contributions system and the process for making a contributions plan.

A ‘Section 7.11 Contributions Plan’ prepared by a Council for the provision of infrastructure is a part of an infrastructure funding and delivery system which includes:

·    Special Infrastructure Contributions (SIC) for state and regional infrastructure,

·    planning agreements,

·    direct works associated with development,

·    user connections with utilities providers, and

·    capital works funded through Government budget processes.

While complex, the relevant legislation and policies provide a framework which specifics the types of essential and non-essential infrastructure for which contributions can be levied, while the essential works list determines the standard which can be delivered.

This report provides the overarching detail of the preparation of Council’s Section 7.11 Contributions Plan and as such, its nexus to development based on expected development, apportionment to that expected development, analysis of available information, Government policy and Council’s delivery priorities. It cannot identify or seek to levy for backlog infrastructure or items beyond those identified in the relevant plans and guidelines identified above.

A Section 7.11 Contributions Plan does not permit development but enables the funding of local infrastructure as a result of that development.

The Draft Wollondilly Contributions Plan (the Draft Plan) has been prepared by Council, with the assistance of consultants, GLN Planning, and using specialist advice from AEC Group (housing and population), Cred Consulting (social infrastructure), Civic MJD (land valuation) and Mitchell Brandtman (cost reporting/quantity surveyors).

The Draft Plan has been prepared with the intention to provide a clear framework for the levying of development contributions for new development in Wollondilly, including the Wilton Growth Area. The Draft Plan is based on best practice principles to provide adequate funding for local infrastructure and will give Council, developers and most importantly current and future Wollondilly residents, confidence that development contributions will contribute equitably towards local infrastructure where it is required.

Council Resolution and Public Exhibition

At its meeting of 16 December 2019, Council resolved as follows:

1.       Endorses the draft Wollondilly Contributions Plan to be placed on public exhibition in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

2.       Receives a further report upon completion of the public exhibition to consider any submissions received during the exhibition.

3.       Advertises its intention to repeal, upon making of the new plan, Wollondilly Development Contributions Plans 1993, 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2011 in the manner set out in this report.

4.       Writes to the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces requesting that the NSW Government consider indexing the current contributions cap.

5.       During the exhibition period, and prior to the repeal of any existing or previous Wollondilly Contribution Plans review its existing allocations to precincts to ensure existing funds already collected are quarantined for their intended use.

6.       As part of this review process advocate to IPART for an increase in the legislated contributions cap of $30,000 for growth areas and $20,000 cap for existing areas.

 

The Draft Contributions Plan was publicly exhibited from 18 December 2019 to 5 February 2020 in accordance with the Act. Five submissions were received, all relating to the Wilton Growth Area.

No objection was raised in the submissions to repealing legacy plans. Clause 5.1 of the draft Plan details how existing contributions funds held in reserve will be reconciled between any incomplete projects in the existing plan and works schedule.

Parts 4 and 6 of Council’s resolution were taken up with the relevant Program Directors at DPIE and IPART.   It is noted that the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces released a reform package for improving the infrastructure contributions system on 15 April 2020. A decision on the cap has been deferred until later this year.

In regards to Part 6, IPART does not legislate contributions caps, but it is charged with the responsibility of reviewing any contributions plan that proposes to levy above a particular cap (in the case of Wollondilly, the caps are $30,000 for the Wilton Growth Area, and $20,000 for existing areas) in accordance with the Planning Minister’s Local infrastructure Contributions Practice Note.

(Note: the contributions cap is scheduled to be removed from 1 July 2020 for Contributions Plans in the “LIGS-Transition” Councils only - Blacktown, The Hills and Wollongong – and only for ‘essential infrastructure’).

Draft Wollondilly Contributions Plan

The total value of local infrastructure attributed to development in the Plan for Wollondilly is listed below.

Local Infrastructure

Total costs by Area

Area A: The Shire (excluding Wilton Growth Area)

$87,822,715

Area B: Wilton Growth Area

$339,548,223

Total cost Local Infrastructure for this Plan

$427,370,938

 

Area A: The Shire (excluding Wilton Growth Area)

A local infrastructure list of land and works is proposed to provide or improve local amenities and services in the Wollondilly Shire, excluding the Wilton Growth Area. This area is subject to a maximum contribution of $20,000 for residential development.

The Plan has been prepared for an expected additional population of 13,214 people in 4,729 additional dwellings over the next 20-years.


 

The cost of local infrastructure to be met by development in Wollondilly Shire (excluding the Wilton Growth Area) is listed below.

Local Infrastructure item

Total costs to Wollondilly Shire new development (ex Wilton)

Roads and transport

 

Land acquisition

$3,485,625

Works

$41,031,993

Sub total

$44,517,618

Open space

Land acquisition

$8,905,215

Works

$23,337,125

Sub total

$32,242,340

Community facilities

Land acquisition

$0

Works

$9,948,000

Sub total

$9,948,000

Other

Plan management and administration

$1,114,757

TOTAL

$87,822,715

 

Contributions rates for different forms of development in Wollondilly Shire (excluding the Wilton Growth Area) are listed below.

Local Infrastructure item

per person

per final lot or dwelling house, dual occupancy dwelling, semi-detached dwelling, attached dwelling

per multi dwelling housing or manor homes

per apartment residential flat building or shop top housing

per seniors living self-contained dwelling

per secondary dwelling, studio dwelling

Roads and transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land acquisition

$264

$818

$686

$581

$396

$264

Works

$3,105

$9,626

$8,073

$6,831

$4,658

$3,105

Sub total

$3,369

$10,444

$8,759

$7,412

$5,054

$3,369

Open space

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land acquisition

$674

$2,089

$1,752

$1,483

$1,011

$674

Works

$1,766

$5,475

$4,592

$3,885

$2,649

$1,766

Sub total

$2,440

$7,564

$6,344

$5,368

$3,660

$2,440

Community facilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land acquisition

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

Works

$753

$2,334

$1,958

$1,657

$1,130

$753

Sub total

$753

$2,334

$1,958

$1,657

$1,130

$753

Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan management and administration

$84

$260

$218

$185

$126

$84

TOTAL

$6,646

$20,603

$17,280

$14,621

$9,969

$6,646

 

Contributions rates for car parking in Picton and Thirlmere are listed below.

Car parking catchment

Contributions Per space

Picton car parking (land)

$8,082

Picton car parking (works)

$10,415

Thirlmere car parking (works)

$10,415

 

Area B: Wilton Growth Area

Land in the Wilton Growth Area is subject to a maximum contribution of $30,000 for residential development. This is because it is a Greenfield release area. The NSW Government’s Wilton 2040: A Plan for the Wilton Growth Area caps development to 15,000 dwellings which is an expected population of 43,288 people over the next 30 years. It is noted that Area B has a longer period of 30 years in order to plan and deliver infrastructure to the expected build-out of the growth area. Given the cap that has been placed on development by the State, there is a better degree of certainty planning for the expected yield and adopted rates of provision.

The cost of local infrastructure to be met by development in the Wilton Growth Area is listed below.

Local Infrastructure item

Cost to be met by Wilton Growth Area development

Roads and transport

 

Land acquisition

$25,726,575

Works

$34,304,622

Sub total

$60,031,197

Open space

Land acquisition

$85,536,665

Works

$124,444,425

Sub total

$209,981,090

Community facilities

Land acquisition

$7,115,000

Works

$62,420,936

Sub total

$69,535,936

Plan Management and Administration

$4,878,826

TOTAL

$339,548,223

 


 

Contributions rates for different forms of development in the Wilton Growth Area are listed below.

Local Infrastructure item

per final lot or dwelling house, dual occupancy dwelling, semi-detached dwelling, attached dwelling

per multi dwelling housing, manor homes

per apartment, residential flat building, or shop top housing

per seniors living self-contained dwelling

per secondary dwelling, studio dwelling

per Hectare of Employment Land

Roads and transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land acquisition

$1,620

$1,359

$1,150

$784

$523

$12,578

Works

$2,159

$1,811

$1,533

$1,045

$697

$16,770

Sub total

$3,780

$3,170

$2,682

$1,829

$1,219

$29,348

Open space

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land acquisition

$7,067

$5,927

$5,015

$3,420

$2,280

-

Works

$10,282

$8,624

$7,297

$4,975

$3,317

-

Sub total

$17,349

$14,551

$12,312

$8,395

$5,597

 

Community facilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land acquisition

$588

$493

$417

$284

$190

-

Works

$5,157

$4,326

$3,660

$2,496

$1,664

-

Sub total

$5,745

$4,819

$4,077

$2,780

$1,853

-

Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan Management and Administration

$403

$338

$286

$195

$130

$440

 

TOTAL

$27,277

$22,878

$19,358

$13,199

$8,799

$29,788

Area A will have a total maximum contribution of $20,000 per lot and Area B will have a total maximum contributions of 30,000 per lot, both complying with the current IPART Cap for the next financial year.

Approach to Infrastructure Delivery

The Draft Plan proposes to continue Council’s existing approach to the delivery of stormwater facilities and roadworks that are direct development works associated with development. Council’s priority is to ensure community infrastructure can be provided without adversely impacting existing residents through the financial impacts of development.

Local road requirements directly associated with development will continue to be conditioned in development consents.  Planning agreements for 35-years maintenance will continue to be negotiated in accordance with Council’s Dedication of Land Policy where a developer proposes to dedicate land and works for stormwater management facilities. This means that essential and non-essential infrastructure can be provided to the contributions plan cap.

The Draft Plan will continue Council’s policy for:

·        the provision of open space at the rate of 2.83 hectares per 1,000 people, and

·        80 square metres per 1000 people for community facilities.

As identified in the Draft Plan, there is no surplus capacity in existing local infrastructure to support development in the Wilton Growth Area and very limited capacity within the remainder of the Shire. Combining these areas would penalise the existing residents in the Shire and any local growth that may occur.  Therefore, the provision of infrastructure and amenities will be apportioned to new development on this basis. In addition, to reduce land acquisition costs (and therefore the contributions rate) the Draft Plan will focus, where it can, on the delivery of improvements to land owned by Council for high quality open space, recreation and community facilities.  This forecast demand has been supported by a needs assessment and informed by the ‘Place Score survey’ undertaken as part of the community consultation process for the preparation of the Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS). These improvements are often referred to as ‘embellishments’. The ‘Essential Works list’ does not include non-trunk infrastructure outside of the Plan as this is the role of the capital works program.

While this is a new plan, Council is committed to regular monitoring, review and if required, amendment of the plan to respond to development trends, cost provision, the legislative environment and infrastructure priorities for Wollondilly.

Trends and Proposed Improvements

The Draft Plan expects that dwelling houses on a single block of land will continue to be the predominant form of development in the Shire. This trend was captured in the AEC housing and population report. A significant increase, however, has been observed in the take up rate of secondary dwellings, accounting for 13% of all Occupation Certificates issued in Wollondilly for the last 2 years. This form of dwelling stock is expected to remain at the same rate into the future. There is an obvious increase in the number of residents from this type of development which places additional demands on local infrastructure. This correlation is called a ‘nexus’ and should be captured in our contributions plan. It is therefore proposed to include this form of development in the draft Plan.

Wollondilly Development Contributions Plan 2011 (the current plan) incorporates Section 7.12 (formerly Section 94A) Fixed Levies, which are calculated based on the cost of non-residential works approved in the Shire. To date, Section 7.12 fixed levies have collected approximately 15% of the anticipated $8.5m of works scheduled in the 2011 Plan. Funds collected previously have been used to acquire land for the Thirlmere car park and for streetscape improvements in Bargo.

At the same time there is still a demand and need for additional car parking in a number of town centre locations. Given the slow rate of collecting s7.12 levies, the Draft Plan proposes to introduce a section 7.11 contribution for non-residential development in instances where a development cannot provide all of its required car parking on site (no change is proposed to requiring all residential car parking to be provided on the development site). It is also proposed to transfer the section 7.12 fixed levy balance (approx. $800k) to the car parking contributions category. As a result, car parking spaces in Council car parks will generally be available to all users and not allocated to any particular commercial or retail development. Contributions or land dedication for this purpose made in accordance with the previous Contribution Plans are identified in the new Plan.

This proposed change also provides a policy framework to help support jobs and employment in the Shire’s existing towns and villages by removing the need to pay a levy, except for where there is an undersupply of parking which places extra burden and demand on Council.

Following consideration of submissions received in response to the Draft Plan, Section 7.11 contributions within the Wilton Growth Area will apportion the traffic demand generated for transport infrastructure between Residential Development and Employment Lands, without an overall increase in the total contributions levied. The apportionment factor complies with IPART guidance for simple apportionment rates for transport and is based on the 20% Net Developable Area (NDA) of existing and potential Employment Land in Wilton 2040.

Administrative Provisions

Indexation of works and contributions is needed to meet the movements in inflation. Indexation of works items is to be in line with the 6401.0 Consumer Price Index CPI (All Groups) for Sydney Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). It is noted that the current contributions plan has not kept pace with the movement of the land values, resulting in either a financial shortfall or the acquisition of poorer quality land with available funds. In relation to the acquisition of land and land valuation identified in the Draft Plan, it is proposed to introduce a land value index (or LVI). Introduction of an LVI complies with the IPART information paper on the indexation of contribution rates and is consistent with contributions plans in place at Camden, Campbelltown, Wollongong and Liverpool.

It is proposed to use 6416.0 – Establish House Price Index: Eight Capital Cities – Sydney as published by the ABS on a quarterly basis.  This index measures price change in residential dwelling stock (which includes detached dwelling houses, house with office; house with flat, rural residential houses, Semi-detached, row and terrace houses, townhouses and flats, units and apartments) over time. The benefit of this index is that it is easily available, with a broadly accepted methodology. Both methods of indexation are endorsed by IPART and comply with the Regulation.

Repeal of the Plan

Clause 1.7 of Wollondilly Contributions Plan 2011 states that the plan supersedes Wollondilly Development Contributions Plan 2005 and 2010 plans, but these were not formally repealed.

As a matter of process, the Wollondilly Development Contributions Plans 1993, 2000, 2005 and 2010, as well as Wollondilly Contributions Plan 2011, will be formally repealed upon the new Plan coming into effect.

Development contributions conditioned and/or received from development under these repealed plans will be allocated to the provision of local infrastructure in accordance with Clause 5.1 of the Plan.

Infrastructure Costings

The Infrastructure costing contained in the draft contributions plan has been prepared using the following methods:

·        Assessment by quantity surveyors;

·        Extracts from specialist studies and reports;

·        IPART recommended costing for recent and comparable review;

·        Actual costs or unit rates incurred by Council; and

·        Indexation of comparable costings from the existing contributions plan.

The costings have been reviewed extensively by Council officers and are considered to be robust and reasonable for a program of 20-30 years of local infrastructure delivery. As noted in the report, it is also planned to review the plan more regularly to ensure that changes, trends and needs are identified and addressed.

Contributions Areas

In order to plan and administer development contributions in a more efficient and effective manner, the Draft Plan will have two contributions areas:

·        Area A: The Shire (excluding Wilton Growth Area); and

·        Area B: Wilton Growth Area.

NSW Government Policy

The Minister for Planning and Public Spaces issued the Environmental Planning and Assessment (Local Infrastructure Contributions) Direction 2018 on 18 December 2018.  This Ministerial Direction stipulates that Council must not grant consent to residential development requiring contributions in excess of $30,000 lot/dwelling in the Wilton Growth Area, or $20,000 per lot/dwelling for the remainder of the Shire.

 

 

Greater Macarthur

The NSW Government declared Greater Macarthur as a Growth Area on 6 December 2019, by way of an amendment to the State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Region Growth Centres) (2006) (Growth Centres SEPP) to identify the Greater Macarthur Growth Area. This was after the Plan was drafted but before it was reported to Council.

 

As in the case of Wilton 2040 under the current Wollondilly Development Contributions Plan 2011, without prejudice and without prompting or supporting an outcome, should land be zoned for urban purposes in Greater Macarthur under the Growth Centres SEPP, the provisions of Clause 270A of Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 must be complied with. This means that development under the SEPP must not be determined unless there is a Section 7.11 contributions plan in place, or a planning agreement entered into to address infrastructure demands.  A new local contributions plan for the Wollondilly area of Greater Macarthur will need to be developed by Council as part of the future planning process.

Value of the Plan

In a general sense, the value of the per lot contributions for the Growth Area is ‘lower’ than most other local government areas with existing contributions plans for Greenfield development. This can be explained for a number of reasons, including

·        The location and type of land and works included in other plans. In some cases, roads and stormwater add significant additional value to those plans, noting that these are addressed outside of the contributions plan in Wollondilly by development conditions and planning agreements. 

·        The current legislative framework detailing what Council is allowed to levy for. While there are ‘recurrent costs’ and other costs associated with development, many of those costs cannot be recouped within the current legislation. Some other plans are ‘older’ and were allowed to charge higher rates.

·        The value of a plan can in itself be misleading. The true infrastructure delivery costs should include ‘whole of development’ considerations, including local, regional, state, existing capacities and accessibility to infrastructure etc.

The Draft Plan identifies land and works for essential and non-essential local infrastructure within the relevant guidelines.

 

IPART Review

Should Council seek to levy a contribution in excess of the relevant thresholds applicable at the time, review by IPART would be required in accordance with the process set out in the Local Development Contributions Practice Note: For the assessment of Local Contributions Plans.

The Practice Note categorises local infrastructure into ‘essential infrastructure’ and ‘non-essential infrastructure’. ‘Essential infrastructure’ includes those items specified in the essential works list (EWL), which is limited to

·    land for open space and its base level embellishment,

·    land for community services but not any buildings,

·    land and facilities for transport,

·    land and facilities for stormwater management, and

·    the costs of plan preparation and administration.

As stated earlier in this report, the Draft Plan proposes to continue Council’s current practice for the delivery of stormwater facilities and roadworks that are direct development works associated with development through VPAs and development conditions respectively.  Council is also required to comply with IPART’s guidance regarding which roads can be included in contributions plans.

Non-essential infrastructure includes community facilities such as neighbourhood centres, libraries, leisure centres, skate parks, BMX tracks and dog-off-leash areas. The social needs assessment undertaken by Council as part of preparing this Draft Plan identifies all of these facilities as being required and arguably necessary for local communities in the Shire.

During the life of the new plan, should Council seek to levy a contribution above the applicable thresholds (ie, currently $20,000 and $30,000), a funding shortfall for non-essential infrastructure would be created. Council would have to find other funding sources (such as rates or borrowing) or some elements of social infrastructure could not be provided.

Consultation

The Draft Plan was publicly exhibited between 18 December 2019 and 5 February 2020 in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000. Five submissions (all relating to the Wilton Growth Area) were received during the exhibition. Submissions and responses to matters raised are discussed below.

Matter Raised

Officer Response

Costs for Road and Transport Works to be reviewed.

All works in the Plan have been costed by Quantity Surveyors with extensive industry knowledge of the nature and scale of development supported by the Plan. Council officers also intend to regularly review costs in the Plan.

Clarify the CP wording in regards to the recoupment of the costs of amenities and public services previously provided in advance of the development in the area.

Works in Wilton are as a result of new development and don’t address any backlog that may or may not exist. The clause applies to the recoupment of funds Council has to spend upfront to support a new community, which will be repaid as the area develops.

Land values prepared for the precincts

Land values in the plan have been prepared by a land valuer with considerable industry knowledge.  The values are consistent with IPART guidelines, including the concept of ‘underlying zoning’ which is informed by the structure plan, not the Urban Development Zone.

Dwelling Occupation rates can be viewed as a bell curve and as such reduce over time.

 

A bell curve may exist for a single release or stage when viewed over time.  With a new greenfield area of 15,000, lots in Wilton will be released in stages over a long period, which from an occupancy rate point of view will be seen as a consistent line for the life of the Plan.

Review plan, following the release of DPIE IPP.

 

Council officers are committed to the regular review of all aspects of this contributions plan.

Revise population projections to reflect the latest NSW Government data.

 

The occupancy rates are generally in accordance with detailed work commissioned by Council. Wilton is new greenfield development at the beginning of its development lifecycle with predominantly single dwellings, not a mature infill development seeking urban renewal, which the NSW Government numbers are more comparable to.  No further action required.

Revise occupancy rates based on lower population projections.

The occupancy rates are generally in accordance with detailed work commissioned by Council. Again, the NSW assumed development rates do not reflect a new greenfield Growth Area, such as Wilton.

Infrastructure maps require more clarity and should reflect existing commitments for local infrastructure

Updated to clarify extent of land and works and existing commitments from local VPAs and DCPs where applicable.

Revise dwelling take-up projections to reflect delays to planning/release of land.

Take-up rates were developed in consultation with and with input by the developers or consultants engaged on behalf of Council. The average take-up rate per year however does not affect the total amount of infrastructure required for the whole of the WGA.

Define ‘MPB’.

MPB means Material Public Benefit, which has the same meaning as in the Act.

Expected staging of residential development of the development overall time in each precinct.

 

Dwelling numbers reflect and support the dwelling caps in Wilton 2040. Council welcomes the sharing dwelling/lot tracking data during the implementation of the development.

Remove discretion and provide for WIK agreements

It is at Council’s discretion to determine if it will enter into a WIK agreement. In response to an internal review of the document, the vision has been updated. The updated vision is not inconsistent with the feedback.

Remove discretion and provide for indexing of credits for excess contributions

Appears to be joining two concepts. Council will always retain the discretion to enter into an agreement. If it does enter into an agreement, the terms of that agreement will specify how indexation of a contributions surplus may be calculated.

Remove requirement that Planning Agreements must offer works and / or land in excess of the required S.7.11 Contributions

A Planning Agreement is offered voluntary and limited to what is outlined in Section 7.4. The statement is consistent with Council’s CSP, Planning Priorities in the LSPS and to fund innovative solutions to the community's infrastructure needs, as outlined in the Minister’s draft practice note. Council is being transparent in its intentions to ensure planning agreements deliver a community benefit.

Indexation rate should be applied from the rezoning date.

 

Anticipated development is consistent with Wilton2040 and infrastructure is known. The Wollondilly Contributions Plan is a nominal rate plan and indexation will be applied from the date of adoption.

Discount small lot housing under 300 sqm – $23872 to $10000.

Development contributions are calculated based on the expected occupancy rate of the development not lot size.

Exclusion of some local and collector roads.

 

The approach and application of IPART’s guidance is to exclude from the plan local roads and frontage works that can be delivered as direct development works and are required in accordance with council’s engineering specifications.

The road and transport works costs be reviewed in response to detailed road costings prepared by Governors Hill.

Council officers will regularly review the plan, include land, works, timing and costs.

Extend the East-West collector through the town centre to the freeway to improve connectivity within Wilton new town.

 

Transport in the Plan supports Wilton 2040 and infrastructure identified by released structure plans, within the limits of IPART guidelines for roads in contributions plan.

Inconsistencies in tables and calculations in the Plan and schedules.

Tables and calculations have been updated.

Council should share costs for community facilities.

New community infrastructure in the Plan is only required as a direct result of the development, and is necessary in creating a new community. This includes neighbourhood centres, libraries, leisure centres etc. 

The needs of the existing community are being met with current facilities.

The Plan needs to be amended to reflect demand for transport facilities from employment lands.

As outlined in the report, the plan has been amended to apportion the cost of transport facilities for employment land based on its anticipated NDA in Wilton 2040.

Object to payment of road linking South East Precinct with Town Centre and to the negative impacts of sporting fields adjoining the existing Bingara development.

The subject land is identified in Wilton 2040 as potential future Employment Land. As stated above, employment land will be levied on an apportioned basis for transport facilities. The playing fields shown in the draft Plan are  benchmarks adopted by the Plan and as such are not required to serve population demand. They have been removed from the Plan.

Volume and contributions to open space and community floor space for the Bingara development.

 

Maps and schedules have been updated to reflect the current situation with Bingara. The current VPA only applies to the first 1,165 lots. The demand for traffic, open space and community facilities from the 1,165 lots has been excluded from the anticipated development in the plan. As stipulated in the consent orders, the development can pay development contributions, or enter into a VPA for subsequent development. 

Inclusion and commitment to intersection upgrades on Picton Road to be shown in the Plan.

Picton Road is a State road and all works on it are State infrastructure. This Plan will only apply to local infrastructure items.

Revise provision of community facilities in the Wilton Growth Area to reflect demand from the new development only, by reducing capacity of facilities or adjusting the apportionment costs.

All infrastructure demands for the Wilton Growth Area have been calculated on the new 15,000 dwellings in Wilton 2040, using industry accepted benchmarks and provision rates. There is no spare capacity in existing infrastructure and the facilities have been sized for the demands generated by incoming development.

Collaborate with the State Government on a holistic infrastructure charge which enables development.

 

As stated in Wilton 2040, Council and DPIE are currently working on an Infrastructure phasing plan (IPP).

 

Reasonableness of including drainage and road works

It is agreed that it is not reasonable to levy all developments from one sites direct development works.

Community facilities such as the indoor recreation facility, district library and district community hub should either be removed from the plan, or a reduced portion allocated to Wilton developers and the remainder paid by Council.

The social infrastructure listed is required due to the demand generated from the Wilton Growth Area development. They have been sized and costed using industry benchmarks for new greenfield developments.

Swimming pool sizes should be reduced from 50m to a 25m pool and a recreation pool.

Plan has been amended to reflect the needs assessment and the adopted benchmark.  The Plan provides for a 25m swimming pool and a program pool for activities such as kids learn to swim classes and seniors water-aerobics. This is what has been costed in the Plan so there is no change to the works cost.

Amend plan to show full cost Almond/Hornby St

Council’s position on local roads being direct works attributable to developers remains unchanged. However, in reviewing the constraints on this road, including undevelopable land, fragmented ownership of small properties, full width reconstruction is included in the plan.  

Land and embellishment costs for riparian corridor/cycle path should be included in plan

There are no plans to change long-term practice and include riparian corridors in the Plan.

Indexation should be applied from when land is rezoned.

The Contributions Plan applies to all of Wollondilly and indexation will be applied from the date of adoption.

 

Change made to the Plan after exhibition

Following the public exhibition, a number of alterations have been made to the Draft Plan in consideration of submissions received, internal review including specialist feedback from staff across Council, and legislative updates. These alterations are considered to be consistent with the exhibited Draft Plan and not of a nature that require re-exhibition in any form.

The refinements are considered to clarify and strengthen the overall intent of the document and relate to:

·        Apportionment of the cost of transport infrastructure,

·        Clarification of administrative provisions,

·        Refinements to clarify the location, base rates and costs of certain open space on transport items in the Works Schedule,

·        Plan Administration costs to reflect current IPART practice, and

·        Clear display and annotation of infrastructure items in the Maps.

Financial Implications

The Wollondilly Contributions Plan once adopted will authorise Council to require development contributions towards the provision of $427,370,938 worth of local infrastructure over the next 20-30 years.

The EP&A Act 1979 and associated Regulations prescribe the process for adoption and notification of approved contributions plans. In accordance with these provisions, it is recommended that Council adopts the Plan with effect from 1 July 2020.

The works values in the Draft Plan attached were correct for the period they were drafted.  However, indexation of Works items by CPI occurs every 3 months, with the most recent release occurring between drafting of the Plan and its adoption date. Accordingly, it is also recommended that Council authorises the Chief Executive Officer to make any updates to the Contributions Rates as a result of changes to CPI, before the plans comes into effect.

 

Attachments

1.       Draft Wollondilly Contributions Plan – Post Exhibition (April 2020)  

2.       Public Submissions   

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

11.3       Proposed Water Symposium

File Number:           10619-2#188

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide advice to Council on Sydney Water’s response to Council’s resolution from the 18 February 2020 Ordinary meeting proposing a water symposium.

Sydney Water has advised that at this time it is not proposed to hold a water symposium. However, it will shortly be commencing consultation as part of its regional planning for the Macarthur Region.

 

Recommendation

That Council notes:

1.       Sydney Water has advised that at this time it is not proposed to hold a water symposium.

2.       Sydney Water is progressing a Regional Planning project for the Macarthur area and community consultation will be undertaken as part of the project.

3.       Sydney Water will continue to work with Wollondilly Shire Council as a key stakeholder in planning for future water security for the growth areas.

 

Report

At its Ordinary Meeting on 18 February 2020 Council resolved as follows:

RESOLUTION  22/2020

Moved: Cr Matthew Gould

Seconded:           Cr Judith Hannan

That Council:

1.     Notes the advice in this report regarding responses from agencies as per the resolution of 16 September 2019.

2.     Formally requests that Sydney Water convene a Greater Sydney water symposium as a matter of priority given the continuing drought and recent bushfire emergency, and the importance of securing Sydney’s future water security ahead of population growth planned for Western Sydney.

3.     Brings a further report to council following the response from Sydney Water or in three months.

4.     Informs all Local NSW Members of Parliament of the Water Symposium.

 

On Friday, 28 February 2020, the following advice was received from Sydney Water:

Sydney Water is progressing its regional planning for the Macarthur Region and we would like to work with Wollondilly Council as a key stakeholder in this area.

Please find attached a Sydney Water briefing note that explains Sydney Water’s Regional Planning project and outlines how Sydney Water plans to collaborate with stakeholders.

Sydney Water noted that Wollondilly Council has recently requested Sydney Water hold a Water Symposium to address water issues including water security, bushfire and drought.  Sydney Water does not propose to hold a symposium at this time but to engage through the Regional Planning project.

Sydney Water has advised they will continue to work with Wollondilly Council in planning for water security for the growth areas. The Regional Planning work will not serve the function of a Water Symposium, but Sydney Water has advised that they hope working with Council on their Regional Planning will provide Council with valuable insights for wider discussions with government.

Consultation

The Council resolution has been discussed with Sydney Water officers and provided advice as quoted above. Sydney Water has also advised that community consultation will be undertaken as part of the Regional Planning stakeholder engagement.

Sydney Water has provided further details of the proposed community consultation program.

A meeting with Wilton Action Group Monday is scheduled for 11 May.

Similar meetings will be arranged with other community groups.  So far the following groups have been identified:

·    Camden Residents Action Group

·    Carlton Road Resident Action Group

·    Menangle Community Association

·    Bargo Progress Association

·    Save Mount Gilead Inc.

Sydney Water will also be seeking input on other groups that should also be consulted.

 

Financial Implications

Ongoing collaboration and engagement with Sydney Water on water planning for the growth areas will not have any budgetary impact.

Attachments

1.       Regional Planning Stakeholder Briefing Paper - February 2020    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

11.4       Solar Panels in New Dwellings and Council assets

File Number:           10619-2#186

 

Executive Summary

This report explores available options to promote Ecologically Sustainable Design (ESD) measures in residential dwellings and Council assets. This is in response to Council’s resolution of 18 February 2020:

That a report be prepared for Council for the May 2020 Ordinary Meeting on strategies to encourage more solar panels to be installed within the Shire, including new dwellings and Council assets.

Council has limited control over incentivising solar panels via planning controls as the NSW Government BASIX tool already recognises photovoltaics as an alternative energy source within the assessment tool.

A more holistic integrated approach to sustainability by Council is recommended.  This will be achieved by adopting a supportive approach to lead by example and educate in order to create awareness of best practice design principles and energy efficient living.

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Explores options to increase energy efficiency benchmarks and sustainability controls in the revised Wollondilly DCP.

2.       Explores options to promote the benefits of Ecologically Sustainable Design (ESD) measures by supporting and educating developers (including mums and dads) on the building design elements required to achieve improved ESD outcomes.

3.       Notes that an energy and water consumption study is currently underway, which can be used to identify opportunities to install solar panels on high energy Council buildings.

4.       Notes that the design process for the Picton Civic, Cultural & Community Precinct includes the design, investigation and assessment of the potential for the Ecologically Sustainable Design measures for power generation, as well as measures for reduced energy and water consumption.

5.       Explores the option to partner with organisations such as SunSPot to map the solar potential in the LGA for existing dwellings.

6.       Investigates opportunities to partner with other organisations/councils in the local area to purchase renewable energy as opportunities arise.

 

Report

Background

Improved sustainability in residential development is presently mandated through the NSW Government’s Building Sustainability Index (BASIX) scheme.  BASIX aims to deliver equitable, effective water and greenhouse gas reductions across the state.  Although BASIX is one of the strongest sustainable planning measures used in Australia, it does not apply to non-residential development.

Since 2007, all new NSW residential developments with a total estimated cost of works of $50,000 or more have required BASIX certification.  The BASIX system, which sets the baseline sustainability standards for thermal comfort, energy and water use for new residential development, is implemented at the development assessment stage.

Under BASIX, all new residential developments in NSW must be designed and built to use 40% less mains water and produce 40% less greenhouse gas emissions than average housing of the same type prior to the commencement of the scheme in 2004.  The BASIX tool also enables a range of sustainability commitments to be adopted by the developer to increase the development's sustainability score.

These environmental outcomes provide a long term financial saving for the homeowner – and a valuable contribution to the sustainable future of our communities.

It is intended to assist renovators, builders and home buyers to build and purchase homes with excellent thermal characteristics and low long term energy consumption levels.

BASIX sets Energy targets to deliver greenhouse gas reductions for the NSW community.  BASIX Energy targets vary, depending on the type and location of the home.  These variations ensure BASIX remains cost-effective and fair to everyone.

The Energy targets were rigorously tested on all building types throughout NSW by the Department of Planning & Environment and industry.  This ensures that across NSW:

·        Each building type will have similar compliance costs

·        Each building type will make substantial greenhouse gas reductions.

BASIX already recognises photovoltaics as an alternative energy source and is an option within the assessment tool.  Council therefore has limited control over incentivising solar panels via planning controls.

Photovoltaic systems size are generally limited by cost, roof orientation and availability of suitable unshaded space.  It is therefore common to install a smaller photovoltaic system that meets only part of the total electricity demand of the building.

Apart from cost and site constraints, other issues with photovoltaic systems include:

·        Lack of alternatives available in instances where rooftop solar is not possible

·        Lack of appropriate finance mechanisms to reduce the burden of the substantial upfront capital cost

·        Current grid integration issues need to be addressed.

If considered in isolation, solar power alone may not be the most effective approach to achieving good energy efficiency outcomes.  A recent report by the Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council (ASBEC) and ClimateWorks Australia found that other aspects of energy efficiency need to be improved first before mandating alternative energy sources such as photovoltaics.  This would also mean smaller renewable energy systems would be required, reducing the cost of investment.

The most cost-effective energy efficiency opportunities identified included:

·        Reducing air leakage

·        Dwelling orientation

·        Increasing roof insulation

·        Use of ceiling fans in in warm and hot climates.

The report found that the above cost-effective measures could reduce energy consumption for heating and cooling by an estimated 28% to 51% across a range of housing types and locations.  Figure 1 below illustrates the cost versus the relative benefit of various sustainability measures:

Hierarchy of actions.jpgFigure 1:  Cost vs Relative Benefit of Sustainability Measures

Encouraging the installation of more solar panels is commendable, however, a more holistic integrated approach to sustainability will achieve improved energy efficient outcomes.  Ideally, residential development should follow the preferred approach highlighted in Figure 2.

Figure 2:  Preferred Approach to Realising Energy Efficiency Outcomes

Council should provide a supportive role to educate and create awareness of best practice design principles and energy efficient living.  This knowledge leads to the application of appropriate passive design principles at the lot level – i.e. optimum house orientation for solar access and passive cooling which is then integrated into the overall building design to reduce heating and cooling loads for the site.  Installation of energy efficient systems are encouraged for consideration once the overall load of the building is reduced to make sure that optimum cost and system size is achieved.  After this, solar PV could be investigated to offset the peak energy demand of the household with the option to purchase renewable offsets to offset the remaining non-renewable energy demand of the building.

In light of the above, Council’s biggest opportunity is to adopt a leadership role in this area.  A few case studies of how other councils are leading in sustainability followed by some identified opportunities and constraints are highlighted below.

Leadership & Educational Examples From Other Councils

·        Inner West Council:

o   Incorporated local solar systems on to some of their Council-owned assets including pools, libraries, childcare centres and offices.  Information including location, array size and real-time solar data is publically available for community interest and education, refer Figure 3 (https://www.innerwest.nsw.gov.au/live/environment-and-sustainability/climate-change/councils-action-on-climate-change).

o   Inner West Council is also supplied with over 4 million kilowatt-hours of renewable power each year from Moree solar farm as part of a Southern Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils (SSROC) agreement.  The solar agreement offers competitive electricity prices as the electricity is purchased in bulk and reduces the pressure to manage rising, volatile electricity prices.  The energy supplies almost all of the council’s daytime electricity use, helping to power pools, sportsfields, libraries and many other facilities which reduces Inner West Council's carbon emissions by almost 4,000 tonnes (CO2) every year.

o   Collaborated with SunSPoT to map the estimated solar electricity generation potential for each roof in the Inner West LGA.  The tool calculates how much electricity and money could be saved by installing a solar system, including estimate of technical potential of rooftop solar, accounting for solar radiation, the tilt of roof surfaces and shading at the site:          https://www.innerwest.nsw.gov.au/about/news/media-releases/2018-media-releases/council-makes-going-solar-easy

·        North Sydney Council:

o   Converted the historic Waverton Coal Loader to an educational community Sustainability Centre.  The Coal Loader Centre for Sustainability is a platform for the delivery of a wide range of sustainability programs and a location where people can visit to be inspired to make change for sustainability in their lives.  The Genia Mcaffery building within the Centre was retrofitted with sustainability initiatives including stormwater harvesting, energy and water-saving technology, best-practice architectural refurbishing, use of solar power, low environmental impact materials and recycled materials.  The Centre is open to the public for information and to demonstrate some sustainability principles that can be applied in the home:

https://www.northsydney.nsw.gov.au/Waste_Environment/The_Coal_Loader/About_the_Coal_Loader

·        Penrith Council:

o   Provide “Home Solar Information Nights” to educate and provide awareness of solar PV systems to demystify the best options without the sales pitch: https://www.penrithcity.nsw.gov.au/news/home-solar-information

·        Wollongong City Council:

o   Adopted emission reduction targets including:

§  Net zero emissions by 2030 for all Council operations

§  Net zero emissions for the LGA by 2050.

o   Wollongong City Council is one of 123 councils in Australia who are members of the Cities Power Partnership (CPP).  Councils who join the partnership are required to make five action pledges in either renewable energy, efficiency, transport or working in partnership to tackle climate change.  The CPP also acts as a knowledge sharing platform for councils.  For example, a specific reference on their website page “Let’s say your council wants to set a benchmark for new housing developments to put solar on the roof of every new home.  The partnership will connect you to other councils who are already doing it, through our online portal and buddying system”.  This is something that could be explored for Wollondilly Shire Council.  For more information: https://citiespowerpartnership.org.au/

Figure 3 Inner West Council Example - Real Time Solar Data Online Platform

The greatest opportunity for Council to take a leadership role is by promoting the benefits Ecologically Sustainable Design (ESD) measures in development.  This can include educating the community, setting organisational emission reduction targets and installing ESD measures on Council assets.

Incorporating best practice sustainable design principles into the new Council Administration Building in Picton is an ideal opportunity to ensure the project becomes an ESD flagship project.  This could act as a visual representation of sustainable design, and act as a model of sustainability at a commercial scale to encourage consideration of these principles in both other commercial and residential development.  Further, this would minimise Council’s carbon footprint and reduce annual operational costs through savings in energy utility bills.  The Council Administration Building could also act as a community education facility, similar to the Coal Loader example, which could incorporate a display area with different types of energy efficient building materials and systems, open for community visitation and workshops.

Summary

Opportunities for Council to explore include:

·        Council continues the design process for the Picton Civic, Cultural & Community Precinct including the design investigation and assessment of the potential for Ecologically Sustainable Design measures for power generation and as well as measures for reduced energy and water consumption to be incorporated in the final designs.

·        Sign up to the Cities Power Partnership program to collaborate with other councils that are exploring new ways to demonstrate climate change leadership and incorporate initiatives into regulations.

·        Investigate the provision of stronger sustainability controls into the revised DCP that supports holistic sustainability philosophy, where detailed guidance of passive design principles and energy efficient systems are encouraged.  Noting, Council does not have control of the appliances installed post project completion.

·        Explore options to increase energy efficiency benchmarks in the DCP.  It is believed that the DCP can influence homeowners and developers attitudes through greater understanding of sustainable building design principles, i.e. suitable orientation to maximise passive heating and cooling benefits, improved thermal performance of glazing and building fabric materials, adequate shading to North, East and West facades, etc.

·        Support and educate developers (including mums and dads) on the building design elements required to achieve improved ESD outcomes.  This could include education of how optimum site orientation, shading and thermal performance of different building materials, i.e. brick versus cladding walls or single versus double glazing or increased roof insulation, can achieve cost-effective outcomes over the long-term.  This would also attempt to create a behavioural shift toward long term sustainable outcomes that have the potential to achieve savings on annual utility bills, indoor thermal comfort and resilience to future-proof their homes against changing climate conditions.

·        Investigate opportunities to partner with other organisations/councils in the local area to purchase renewable energy.

·        Explore the option to partner with organisations such as SunSPoT to map the solar potential in the LGA for existing dwellings.

·        Council continues its energy monitoring and reduction program for its largest consumption faculties (the Administration Building, Works Depot, Library and Warragamba Pool) and which over the period 2012-2017 has resulted in:

o   Administration building - 38% reduction in annual energy usage associated with the installation of a power correction device, improved BMS systems to manage HVAC and lighting and also the installation of a new HVAC system.

o   Works depot - 16% reduction in energy usage through education and cultural shift.

·        Renewing the Sustainability Advantage program membership will be using the consultant support provided by the program to guide council in setting up an efficient energy usage tracking system.

Consultation

Development Assessment staff consulted with the following Council departments:

·        Sustainable Growth

·        Environmental Outcomes

·        Infrastructure Strategy & Planning.

Financial Implications

Any costs associated with progressing the recommendations of this report can be absorbed within existing operational budgets.

Attachments

Nil  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

12        Management and Provision of Infrastructure

12.1       Tender for Management & Operation of Warragamba Swimming Pool

File Number:           10619-2#141

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to inform Council that tenders were called for the Warragamba Swimming Pool Management 2020/04 on 19 February 2020.  The tender is for the day-to-day management and operation of the Warragamba Swimming Pool.  The call for tenders closed on 17 March 2020.

The tenders were assessed for compliance with the tender documentation and with Council’s swimming pool operation budget.  One tender was non-complying due to a lack of management systems.  The remaining two tenders were complying with the tender documentation; however, were well in excess of Council’s swimming pool operation budget.

Response measures stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in the closure of aquatic centres and the duration and consequence of the response is unknown.

This report recommends that Council decline to accept all tenders as the tenders do not provide a viable bid for managing the Warragamba Swimming Pool in the current economic environment and that Council enter into negotiations with a view to entering into a contract for the management of the facility.

Recommendation

That:

1.       Council rejects all tenders for the Warragamba Swimming Pool Management 2020/04.

2.       In accordance with Regulation 178(e), as the tenders do not provide a viable bid for managing the Warragamba Swimming Pool in the current economic environment, Council enter into negotiations with a view to entering into a contract for the management of the facility.

3.       Council notes the potential need to increase the operational budget to match the amount for the new contract once known.

 

Report

Background

Council has an existing tender for the Management and Operation of Warragamba Swimming Pool (2016/08).  This tender has a term of 3.75 years from 1 October 2016 to 30 June 2020 with one 4 year option to be exercised at Council’s discretion.  Following a process of considering the contact extension, it was decided that it was appropriate to call new tenders for the contract.

Tender Evaluation

Tendered submissions received were either non-complying on non-price criteria or compliant but priced in excess of the estimate of expected contractor costs and income.  This suggests a high level of uncertainty priced into the tenders.

The Tender Evaluation Panel recommends not to accept any of the submissions given the uncertainty of how none of the submissions provide acceptable value to Council.

Coincidently, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced closures of facilities such as aquatic centres.  It is hoped that the facility will be permitted to reopen in time for the 2020/21 season; however, this remains uncertain.  Additionally, further conditions may have to be realised and included in the revised specifications as a result.

The Panel recommends for Council to enter into negotiations to form a new contract for managing the facility.

Regardless of the alternative selected, the operational budget for the 2020/21 financial year will have to be the subject of further review.

Consultation

Not applicable.

Financial Implications

Any budget change implications from the outcome of the negotiation process will be the subject of a future report to Council.

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

12.2       Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct - Status Update

File Number:           10619-2#112

 

Executive Summary

Council has resolved to build the Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct at Picton to deliver a range of much needed new and improved services, enhancing liveability and economic viability for the growing Wollondilly community.

Crucially right now with the impacts of Covid-19, construction of the ‘Precinct’ will provide local economic stimulus, construction jobs and more employment for Picton town centre to support local businesses and the broader Wollondilly community.

The ‘Precinct’ will deliver much needed community floor space, performance and entertainment spaces.  It will provide a beautiful new ‘green civic square’, a contemporary library catering for much needed remote work and study opportunities, embellished open spaces, improved government services and a safe meeting place for the community to come together.

The project is progressing well with Stage 1 fully-funded by grants, developer contributions and building renewal funds. Preparatory works have commenced and early construction works commence in June 2020.

The full Precinct Master Plan is structured over four key stages with an anticipated 10 year delivery program at a total estimated investment of $76m (current value).  It will be funded utilising secured and available grants; received and projected development contributions; asset renewal funding; as well as a degree of borrowings to assist in the timely implementation.  Delivery of this project does not affect funding for Council’s road renewal and upgrade program which will continue as a critical priority.

This report provides an update on progress to date.

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Notes the Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct project update, including progress on the delivery of Stages 1 & 2 to provide a range of much needed new and improved services for the Wollondilly community, together with the planned funding strategy.

2.       Notes the $10.7 million Western Sydney Liveability Program grant funding agreement for this project has been executed and writes to the relevant ministers and state & federal members of parliament to express appreciation for their support of this iconic liveability project.

3.       Accelerates implementation of Stage 1 of the ‘Precinct’ to provide local economic stimulus, construction jobs and more employment for Picton town centre to support local businesses and the broader Wollondilly community, funded by grant funding and developer contributions.

4.       Seek relevant funding opportunities and partners to enable delivery of the Master Plan in a timely and cost-effective manner.

 

Report

In early 2019, Council commenced a master planning process for the creation of the Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct (Precinct) at Picton.

This project was identified as a ‘once-in-a-generation opportunity’ to create a locally relevant, identifiable and community inspired cultural, civic and community precinct in Picton.  It was also an opportunity to inform an application to the Liveability Program, an initiative of the Western Sydney City Deal which is a partnership of the Commonwealth, NSW and eight local governments of the Western Parkland City.

Development of the Precinct will deliver new community facilities including a multi-purpose hall for performance, new library, e-learning hub and connected workspace as well as dedicated spaces for creative activities, fine arts and gallery/exhibition spaces.  The community facilities will be supported by a new civic heart for Wollondilly which will be anchored by a new Council Services Centre, new public square and new childcare with substantial public domain and green space additions to the town centre of Picton.

Vision

The concept for the Precinct has been co-designed by Council and the community, aligning community aspirations and civic functions.  The vision for the Precinct is for it to become the community, civic, cultural and economic heart of Wollondilly.  It will be a meeting place, a place for cultural expression, civic activities, business activity and will bring together community members, the business community and visitors to Wollondilly.

Background

The project set out to identify both existing and future needs for community, cultural and civic spaces to support the rapidly growing Wollondilly community.

An extensive process of community consultation and needs analysis was undertaken involving a wide range of stakeholders.  That process identified unmet demand and future projected need for a range of community, cultural and civic spaces.  This included space for performance and functions, gallery, studio and exhibition, service delivery, multipurpose flexible meeting and activity space, enhanced library provision and quality public open space.

The analysis also revealed the inadequacy of two existing assets – the child care cottage on Menangle Street (which is not currently code compliant) and the adjacent existing Council services centre (which has structural issues, does not meet contemporary code and is not large enough to meet projected staff numbers).

Precinct Master Plan

The identified community needs formed the development of an integrated master plan for the site.  The master plan considered the site’s location in relation to the town centre, the relationship with adjacent properties, its role as one of Picton’s ‘gateway’ sites and how the various components within the site could best work together to create a harmonious precinct that responds to its physical and social context.

The spaces identified in the needs analysis (performance space, enhanced library, open space, etc.) were all considered as individual elements.  The master plan process also considered the relationships between the key components and how an integrated plan could create efficiencies in delivery, effective management and significant community benefits.  Those community benefits extended beyond the simple provision of more community space but responded to identified needs for space activation, visitor attraction, reinforcing local identity, support for local business and the integration of new and existing communities.

The master plan process considered a number of options which tested a range of building arrangements and site orientations.

The final Master Plan, which was the subject to additional community consultation, was adopted by Council on 19 August 2019.

Project Accomplishments

Since the endorsement of the concept of the Cultural and Civic facility to service the Shire from Picton on 27 August 2018, the project team have made significant progress towards the delivery of this key community development including:

·        Successful application for design funding under the Western Sydney City Deal Liveability Program Round 1

·        Completion and adoption of the Precinct Master Plan by Council in August 2019

·        Successful application for construction funding under the Western Sydney City Deal Liveability Program Round 2

·        Progress towards the Shire Hall Refurbishment works are well underway with initial user group consultation and concept design work now complete.  Vast Majority of feedback from stakeholders has been positive and DA works now in progress with an Early Works building package to commence late May.

·        Engagement of a designer to further develop the master plan for the Shire Hall upgrades including the realisation of additional community benefits through the reuse of the existing Children’s Services space for a new adaptable Council Chambers and meeting rooms as well as connectivity improvements to enable better utilisation of the Shire Hall spaces

·        Engagement of detail design consultants for the Shire Hall initial upgrade works

·        Engagement of specialist planning and concept design consultants for the preparation of a Planning Proposal for Stage 2 works to maximise community benefit for Stage 2 & 3 works

·        The purchase of alternative car parking in Walton Lane is nearing finalisation and construction of new car park to follow to address broader town centre and precinct parking needs

·        Application to the Minister administering the Crown Lands Management Act 2016 to classify the Victoria Park Reserve to Operational to facilitate the construction of the replacement Picton RFS Brigade facility

·        The concept design work on the RFS building at Victoria Park has received initial endorsement by the RFS with development level documentation preparation now underway.

·        Council ran a very successful Expression of Interest for Principal Architectural Services in January 2020, receiving 33 submissions from some of the best Architectural firms in NSW.  After evaluating, Council has invited the top five firms to tender, with tenders now being evaluated and award being finalised.  This design package will see the Master Plan refined, the Community Building and Auditorium designs completed and seen through to 100% construction.  Contracts are expected to be entered into in May 2020

·        Successful negotiations with Sydney Water on the management of waste water issues for the precinct to enable completion of the Planning Proposal and Development Application processes – subject to final approval from Sydney Water

·        Commencement of design development phase for the planned car parking at Council’s depot site.

Delivery and Staging

Delivery of the Precinct Masterplan is one project that has been designed to be progressed in four interdependent stages. A site map detailing the staging is attached. The Precinct is to be staged as follows:

Stage 1 (2019/20 to 2022/23) will deliver:

·        A new Cultural and Performance Centre with retractable tiered seating to provide a specialist performance space that is not currently available in Wollondilly, supported by meeting, performance preparation and storage rooms as well as social gathering areas along the frontages of this new building to welcome the community

·        The Cultural and Performance Centre building will also be start of creating a new and welcoming entry point for the Picton town centre

·        A new mixed-use community building that will, on an interim basis, house the relocated child care services.  Upon completion of Stage 4 of the program, these facilities then become available for other broader community uses such as possibly a gallery/exhibition space; and a second floor used for creative studio, workshop space as well as potential opportunities for commercial partners for a café or restaurant

·        Initial refurbishment of the Shire Hall to:

o   Re-open the existing Children’s Services space for community meeting rooms and a new adaptable Council Chambers and community gallery to support local democracy providing modern facilities and broader connectivity technology

o   Improved internal connectivity to enable better utilisation of the Shire Hall

o   De-cluttering and re-energising the public space in front of the Shire Hall to better reflect the heritage and community importance of this classic town hall and enable outdoor community gatherings

o   Repairs to the building façade, improved weatherproofing of the Hall eaves and window surrounds

o   Preparatory works for the Stage 3 upgrades.

·        Development of additional car parking on Walton Street providing 40 spaces for the Picton town centre to augment the existing council parking and take advantage of the new smart lighting scheme along Walton Street and pedestrian crossing across Argyle Street

·        Demolition of the existing child care cottage to enable construction of the new Cultural and Performance Centre and the Stage 4 new Library and Work Hub.

Stage 1 will also require the relocation of the Picton RFS local brigade.

Stage 1 is estimated to cost $20.1m (excluding the RFS relocation which is separately funded) and is fully funded from existing Council funds and a grant received under the Western Parkland City Liveability Program.  A development of the detailed architectural design has commenced with the calling of Expressions of Interest for design architects and refurbishment plans detailed for the Shire Hall.  Stage 1 is estimated to be completed in 2024.

Stage 2 (2019/20 to 2023/24) will deliver:

·        A new Council Services Centre future proofed and options to provide income producing co‑working spaces in the interim or if Council’s method of service delivery changes

·        On-site parking (basement)

·        Public domain works around the building.

Council Services Centre

The existing Council Administration Building occupies a key location on the site.  The site links the proposed Cultural and Performance Centre to the other community and cultural uses (including the Town Square).  It is also a key location in relation to connection to Menangle Street and the broader Picton Town Centre.

While master plan options did consider its retention, the final and adopted master plan includes a new Council Services Centre.  The reasons for this include:

·        The retention of the existing building would limit the size of the proposed performance space and compromise the adopted Precinct Master Plan

·        The existing building:

o   Has significant building condition issues and does not meet current accessibility standards

o   Generates increased maintenance and building management costs

o   Requires significant capital expenditure to meet contemporary community standards

o   Has no capacity to meet expected increases in staff numbers necessary to support the growth of the Wollondilly

·        A modern building design has been shown to generate higher productivity from staff and as such higher service levels for the community, is a key enabler of a customer-focussed organisational culture and attracting quality staff, and provides greater efficiencies in operational costs.

Due to the need to provide a continuity of service, the existing services centre will need to be fully operational for the duration of the construction of the new services centre.

The proposed services centre is envisaged as a key element within the Precinct and is required to serve the community through the planned growth within the Local Government Area.  Key features of the proposed Council Services Centre include:

·      A three and four storey development that enables flexibility and staged growth, providing accommodation for up to 400 staff as well as potentially other government services or commercial tenants with income producing co-working space in the interim (approximately twice what is currently accommodated and responsive to staff projections)

·      Underground car parking

·      A public foyer with reception area and working spaces (integrated to other council services such as the library)

·      Enhanced public domain interfaces

·      A future Village Green within the heart of the Precinct (developed as part of later works).

Testing of the requirement for a new services centre has included research on new office environments.  This has included research studies and visits and discussions with other councils including Shellharbour and Camden.

Research shows that measuring productivity gains in a new office environment remains an inexact science.  However, generally productivity improvements of up to 20% can be achieved from well‑designed office layouts and configurations.  This percentage has been measured from a mixture of staff surveys, management questionnaires, corporate data measurements and building management savings.  The sample includes both private and public sector both in Australia and international context.

Other key findings of this research include:

·      Greater efficiencies in operational costs for Council, especially when energy saving initiatives are utilised.  The current services centre costs Council $105 per square metre per year in operating and maintenance costs.  The new building has been assessed at costing $85 per square metre per year

·      A new building can be designed to accommodate and encourage contemporary work styles including greater collaboration, agile workspaces, meeting rooms, etc

·      A new building can be important in strengthening and/or reinforcing organisational culture and can act as an attractor for new staff

·      Workspaces can be designed to accommodate trends for greater environmental performance including ‘paper-lite’ environments, water conservation and energy efficiency.

Stage 2 is estimated to cost $27.245m.  The project has commenced with review of building controls and approval pathways and is estimated to be completed by 2025.  The building’s capacity gives opportunity for office space to be commercially leased for a period until such time as Council growth requires the use of the building.

As summarised in the Financial Implications of this report, loan funding will be a factor in progressing the project (internal or external borrowings), noting the record low interest rates as an incentive to bring forward construction).

Stage 3 (2023/24 to 2029/30) will deliver:

·        New ‘green civic square’ and public domain works to provide informal and formal community gathering spaces as well as range of opportunities for sheltered or open outdoor eating

·        Modification of Shire Hall including:

o   a new outdoor stage onto the civic “green” square to enable outdoor performances and community presentations

o   construction of improved change amenities and accessible toilets

o   improved airflow, environmental controls and lighting for the main hall

o   opening the pedestrian connectivity along the east side of the Shire Hall

o   Demolition of aging external public toilets and creation of a new food warming and dispensary room and kitchenette to enable catering for community events

o   Repairs to the main hall floor

·        Delivery of the next stage of additional car parking to service the town centre

·        Demolition of the existing administration building to deliver the final stage of the outdoor community space adjacent to the Shire Hall and enable the development of the Stage 4 new and enlarged library and work hub.

These works are estimated to cost $7.150m which will require the relocation of the final stages of car parking.  The works are programmed to start as close as possible to the completion of the services centre and last for up to two years.

Stage 4 (2026/27 to 2026/27) will deliver:

·      Delivery of the new and contemporary library to provide modern and connected study, gathering and learning opportunities of the scale appropriate to the population and community needs

·      A new integrated e-learning and work hub as part of the library building to provide support to the growing community and its learning, social and economic needs

·      Connections between the library and e-learning areas to the community and performance spaces in the Cultural and Performance Centre and the civic green space

·      Internal refitting the current library building to enable contemporary and expanded child care services facilities with improved accessibility, amenities and play spaces

·      Refitting of the mixed-use community building (constructed in stage 1) to deliver great community and social outcomes including a possible gallery/exhibition space; and a second floor used for creative studio, workshop space as well as potential opportunities for commercial partners for a café or restaurant.

These works are estimated to cost $21.5m with the timing somewhat independent on the completion of the proceeding stages, i.e. the commencement of Stage 4 could be dependent on availability of funding and could be seen as a hold point.  The stage of the project is expected to attract grant opportunities.

Overall Program & Funding Strategy

Refined estimates for costs of operations, maintenance as well as income will be developed through detailed design noting that all the buildings will be far more energy efficient and less maintenance intensive than the existing buildings that are near or beyond the end of their useful lives.

A business plan for the operation of the multi-purpose hall is to be developed noting that the hall will require an annual subsidy, which will be dependent on adequate resourcing to manage and drive bookings.

There is potential for income for the other buildings with the availability of commercial office space and kiosks for other government services as well as co-working spaces.

The overall program is estimated to be delivered over ten years, noting that each stage will be subject to the normal annual review process with the development of Operational Plan and Delivery Programs with the current overall program shown below:

When adopting the Master Plan on 19 August 2019, Council also resolved:

That a future funding strategy come before Council to identify funding options excluding an SRV.

The funding options have been considered and it is proposed that Council deliver the Master Plan components as outlined in the attached Funding Strategy.  A Special Rate Variation is not an option that is considered as it is not required.

Consultation

Council conducted significant community consultation prior to adopting the Master Plan for the Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct at its meeting of 19 August 2019.

Financial Implications

Stage 1 of the project is fully funded, predominantly from grants and developer contributions. The attached Funding Strategy outlines the planned funding for stages 204 of the project.

 

Attachments

1.       Council adopted FINAL Master Plan for Wollondilly Community Cultural and Civic Precinct  

2.       Funding Strategy    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

12.3       Traffic Management Upgrades - April 2020

File Number:           10619-2#200

 

Executive Summary

The Local Traffic Committee Agenda & Notice of Meeting was issued 7 April 2020 to consider a number of reports for traffic management in the Wollondilly Local Government Area and to submit recommendations for Council’s consideration at the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held electronically on 14 April 2020.  The agenda papers were also distributed to all Councillors.

 

Recommendation

That, notwithstanding other factors at play that may prohibit the event happening, the traffic management proposals as considered by the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 14 April 2020 be adopted as follows:

1.       LTC Recommendation 1.1 - 2020/21 Cycling Races on Moreton Park Road, Menangle

Council refuse the application from the Camden Cycling Club Inc. to use Moreton Park Road, Menangle to conduct cycling races for a period up to 30 April 2021 on Saturdays starting at 2.00pm and Sundays starting at 8.00am as the applicable COVID‑19 restrictions have not been lifted by the responsible authorities.

Camden Cycling Club Inc. be advised that their application has been refused and to resubmit their application when a program for the lifting of COVID‑19 restrictions is known and hence the events may be going ahead.

2.       LTC Recommendation 1.2 - Remembrance Driveway at the frontage of Wollondilly Anglican College (WAC) - Request for temporary 'No Stopping Zone' & Speed Reduction for the Annual WAC Country Fair Event  planned for Saturday 12 September 2020

Council refuse the implementation of a temporary ‘No Stopping Zone’ as the applicable COVID‑19 restrictions have not been lifted by the responsible authorities.

Wollondilly Anglican College be advised that their application has been refused and to resubmit their application when a program for the lifting of COVID‑19 restrictions is known and hence the event may be going ahead.

3.       LTC Recommendation 1.3 - Temporary Parking Restrictions - Margaret Street, Picton

Council approve the installation of a temporary parking restriction zone on the southern side of Margaret Street, Picton (R5-13) for approximately 70m from Colden Street to the driveway entrance into Picton Mall providing five minute parking for medical patients only.

 

Report

The Local Traffic Committee is a Technical Committee of Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW).  The Committee operates under the authority conferred to Council by TfNSW under the Transport Administration Act 1988.

Council has been delegated certain powers by TfNSW with regard to traffic matters upon its local roads.  A condition of this delegation is that Council must take into account the advice of the Local Traffic Committee.

There are four permanent members of the Local Traffic Committee each of whom has a single vote only.  The members are representatives of the NSW Police Force, TfNSW, the Local State Member of Parliament (for the location of the issue to be voted upon) and a representative of Council.

The Minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 14 April 2020 have been distributed and are available on Council’s website.

Only matters requiring a resolution of Council are included in this report, other endorsed upgrades have been approved under delegated authority.

COVID-19 Ramifications

As there is no program for lifting or modifying the COVID-19 restrictions that currently prohibit the cycling races and Wollondilly Anglican College Country Fair event, it is premature to approve the traffic management plans for the events.  The applicants will be advised to resubmit their request when a program for the lifting or modification of COVID‑19 restrictions is known and hence the events may be going ahead.

Consultation

Refer to the Local Traffic Committee Agenda details included in the Minutes.

Financial Implications

The proposals for Council projects contained within the Traffic Committee Agenda are able to be funded from Council’s current budget allocations or remain the responsibility of the external applicant.

Attachments

Nil  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

13        Caring for the Environment

No reports this meeting


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

14        Looking after the Community

14.1       Wollondilly Health Alliance Progress Report

File Number:           10619-2#201

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide and update on the projects, achievements and challenges of the Wollondilly Health Alliance over the past 12 months.

 

Recommendation

That Council notes the important achievements and challenges of the Wollondilly Health Alliance as outlined in the attached WHA Progress Report.

 

 

Report

The Wollondilly Health Alliance (WHA) is a partnership between the three levels of government: Wollondilly Shire Council, South Western Sydney Local Health District (NSW Health), and South Western Sydney Primary Health Network (Federal Government). The WHA was formed in 2014 and its aim is to proactively and collaboratively address health issues facing the Wollondilly community, and to work towards creating a better serviced and healthier Wollondilly.

The work of the WHA is undertaken by 3 working groups – the Care Process Working Group, Health Promotion Working Group, and Health in Planning Working Group – who are governed by the WHA Operational Committee and, above that, the WHA Executive Committee.

The attached progress report highlights the achievements and challenges of the WHA working group projects over the past 12 months.

Consultation

The attached WHA Progress Report has been compiled in consultation with the members of the WHA Operational Committee and the respective Working Groups

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       Wollondilly Health Alliance Progress Report    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

14.2       Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy

File Number:           10619-2#211

 

Executive Summary

A new Economic Development Strategy (Draft) has been prepared for the Wollondilly Shire. The new strategy articulates the role of the Council in economic development as well as set clear objectives, strategies and actions to achieve the collective aspirations of council and the community. It provides for a Council-wide approach to economic development as well as a collaborative efforts with partner organisations including relevant State and Commonwealth agencies, local business and other stakeholders.

The focus of the strategy is setting out a clear pathway to build the local economy and create thousands of local jobs over the coming years to benefit all of Wollondilly.

Extensive background research and consultation has been undertaken to support the Draft Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy.

The draft strategy is currently being finalised and will be circulated under separate cover.

 

Recommendation

1.       That Council place the Draft Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy on public exhibition for a period of 28 days.

 

Report

This report seeks Council’s endorsement to place the Draft Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy (EDS) on Public Exhibition for a period of 28 days. The report outlines the process in which the draft EDS has been developed including the research, analysis and consultation.

Background

Council adopted its current Economic Development Strategy (EDS) in 2015. Since this time, much has changed and a number of recent developments have occurred, including the new Western Sydney Airport, Aerotropolis, Agribusiness Precinct, Proposed M9 Corridor, Western Sydney City Deal and projected population growth.

A new Economic Development Strategy is now required to capitalise on recent economic, infrastructure and population trends as well as the recent major developments which will impact the future growth potential of the Shire.

In December 2019, Council issued a Request for Quote (RFQ) for suitably qualified consultants to review the current economic development strategy, other major strategies and plans as well as the above mentioned projects and activities to develop a new Economic Development Strategy for Wollondilly.

The new strategy articulates the role of the Council in economic development as well as set clear objectives, strategies and actions to achieve the collective aspirations of council and the community. It provides for a Council-wide approach to economic development as well as a collaborative efforts with partner organisations including relevant State and Commonwealth agencies, local business and other stakeholders.

Extensive consultation was undertaken with Council and other community stakeholders resulting in the development of the following:

·    Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy – Background Report

·    Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy – Consultation Summary

·    Wollondilly Draft Economic Development Strategy

Unfortunately, development of the draft Strategy was slightly delayed due to the impacts of Covid-19 however it is currently being finalised and will be circulated under separate cover.

Consultation

Extensive consultation was undertaken to develop the EDS. Please see the consultation list included in the Consultation Summary Report.

Financial Implications

Funding was allocated to develop the Economic Development Strategy (EDS) as part of the 2019-2020 operational budget. The development of the EDS has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       Draft Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy, Background Report and Consultation Summary (under separate cover)     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

15        Efficient and Effective Council

15.1       Community Forum Guidelines Review

File Number:           10619-2#147

 

Executive Summary

In December 2019 Council commenced a trial of live Webcasting of Community Forums to enhance community participation and access. A full review of the current structure of our Community Forum was undertaken by the Corporate Governance Section of Council to determine further improvements was undertaken and an options paper produced.

 

The options paper was presented to Executive Leadership Team in February 2020 where it was endorsed to keep the current structure and format of the Community Forum with the addition of webcasting and exploration of further enhancements around submission of live questions from the community to be explored.

 

The current Community Forum Guidelines have been updated to bring them in line with the changes endorsed by the Executive Leadership Team.

All amendments proposed are detailed in the attached draft Community Forum Guidelines and summarised in this report.

 

Recommendation

1.       That the Draft Community Forum Guidelines be placed on public exhibition for 28 days with a further 14 days for submissions.

2.       That a report come back to Council following the submission period for the guidelines to be adopted.

 

 

Report

A review of the Community Forum process was recently conducted by Council’s Corporate Governance Team with a view to enhance public engagement and participation.

 

The review consisted of the production of an options paper for the ongoing structure of the Community Forum along with a live webcast trial in acknowledgment of changing public needs.

 

The webcast trial commenced on 2 December 2020 and proved successful with strong live participation. The options paper was presented to the Executive Team on 20 February 2020. 

 

The Executive agreed that the preferred option was to retain our current process with the addition of ongoing webcasting. Enhancement around the submission of statements/questions was also endorsed with ideas for improvement to be further explored including the consideration of real time online questions.

 

An update on our Community Forum Guidelines was therefore required to formally note the addition of Webcasting and the main reason for this report.

 

It was also appropriate however to make other minor corrections to the document to ensure it was current, in plain English, reflective of current practices and to made other minor amendments to the content at this time prior to public exhibition.

 

All amendments made are detailed in the attached Draft Community Forum Guidelines. The changes recommended to the guidelines are summarised as follows:

 

§  The addition of rules for Webcasting the Community Forum

 

§  Update to the date for Community Forums to the second Tuesday of the Month

 

§  Flexibility added in regard to presence at the meeting in exceptional circumstances

 

§  Detail added to the "Community Forum Rules of Conduct" on the expectations on how Council and submitters interact with each other

 

§  The addition of limits upon Acceptance of Community or Informal Question/Statement Forms

 

§  All references to General Manager updated to Chief Executive Officer

 

§  Minor administrative changes to correct outdated references contained within the document

 

§  Considerable change to the layout to relocate and reword text in line with Council's 'Plain English' strategic direction.

Consultation

§ Council’s Executive Leadership Team

§ Manager Corporate Governance and Risk

§ Assistant Director People, Legal and Governance

§ General Counsel

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       Draft Community Forum Guidelines for Public Exhibition  

2.       Draft Community Forum Guidelines with Track Changes    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

15.2       Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2020

File Number:           10619-2#209

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to present the Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2020.

The document reports detailed information on Council’s financial progress for the third quarter of the 2019/20 financial year.

It is recommended that the Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2020 and proposed adjustments to the 2019/20 budget estimates be adopted.

A current list of projects comprising the Capital Works Program will also be tabled for information purposes.

The purpose of the operational plan update is to provide the community an overview of Councils performance in delivering the programs and projects endorsed under the 2019/19 Operational Plan.

The progress update provides information on delivery of key activities for the period 1 July 2019 to 31 March 2020 operational period.

This Quarterly Budget Review Statement is currently being finalised and will be provided under separate cover.

Recommendation

1.       That the Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2020 and proposed adjustments the 2019/20 budget estimates be adopted.

2.       That the list of current projects comprising the Capital Works Program be noted.

 

Report

This Quarterly Budget Review reports on the financial progress towards achieving Council’s 2019/20 Operational Plan objectives as at 31 March 2020.

The Quarterly Review also reports on Council’s progress towards delivering the Capital Project program 2019/20. A list of the current projects comprising the 2019/20 Capital Works Program will be tabled.

The Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) measures Council’s financial health as we progress through the year. It needs to adequately disclose Council’s overall financial position and provide sufficient information to enable Councillors to make informed and transparent decisions. It is also a means by which Councillors can ensure that Council remains on track to meet its objectives, targets and outcomes as set out in the Delivery Program and Operational Plan.

The Office of Local Government has prescribed that the Quarterly Budget Review Statement includes (as a minimum) the following components:

·        Statement by the Responsible Accounting Officer on Council’s financial position at the end of the year based on the information in the review documents;

·        Income and Expenses Statement showing the original and revised budgets, along with any changes proposed in the current Quarterly review. Actual income and expenditure to date is also required to be shown;

·        Explanation for material variations between the revised budget and projected year end result and likely impacts of the variation;

·        Capital Budget, also showing the original and revised budgets, along with any changes proposed in the current Quarterly Review. Actual income and expenditure to date is also required to be shown;

·        Explanation for variations between the revised capital budget and projected year end result and likely impacts of the variation;

·        Cash and investments position;

·        Key Performance Indicators;

·        Contracts entered into during the quarter (>$50,000); and

·        Expenditure to date for Consultancies and external Legal Fees.

Collectively, these documents form the QBRS. Clause 203 (1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires a QBRS to be submitted to Council within two months after the end of each quarter (except the June quarter).

Consultation

All members of the Executive and Senior Management have had input into the production of this budget review and a Councillor briefing session covering the key movements and causes was held on 28 March 2020 by video conference.

Financial Implications

The QBRS provides Council and the Community with information in relation to Council’s projected financial position. Having regard to the projected budget estimates and the original budget, Council’s financial position is considered to be satisfactory.

For the 2019/20 financial year, Council originally adopted a balanced working funds position. Budgetary adjustments identified during the first two quarters have enabled Council to maintain its available working funds at a balanced position.

Details of the proposed budget variations for the third quarter of the 2018/19 financial year are provided in the Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2019, which will be provided under separate cover and be publicly available by the Community Forum on Monday 11 November 2019.

The variations proposed recognise that Council has had an extended period of unplanned disruptions – bushfires, floods and the COVID-19 pandemic, during the course of the year which have each impacted in some way on forecasts.

The Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2019 indicates that Council has continued to progress key projects and deliver essential services as outlined within the 2019/20 Operational Plan and remains able to maintain the planned working funds position.

Attachments

1.       The Quarterly Budget Review Statement for the period ended 31 March 2020 (under separate cover)  

2.       Capital Works Program (under separate cover)    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

15.3       Investment of Funds as at 31 March 2020

File Number:           10619-2#243

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide details of Council’s invested funds as at 31 March 2020.

 

Recommendation

That the information and certification in relation to the investment of Council funds as at 31 March 2020 be noted.

 

 

Report

At its last meeting, the Reserve Bank reaffirmed the targets for the cash rate and the yield on 3-year Australian government bonds of 25 basis points, as well as other elements of the package announced on 19 March 2020. In relation to the domestic market, the Board of the Reserve Bank commented that:

 

“The coronavirus remains first and foremost a very major public health issue, but it is also having very significant effects on economies and financial systems around the world. Many countries are expected to experience large economic contractions as a consequence of the public health response. Large increases in unemployment are also expected. Once the virus is contained, a recovery in the global economy is expected, with the recovery supported by both the large fiscal packages and the significant easing in monetary policy that has taken place.

Financial market volatility has been historically high and many markets around the world have been dislocated. There are, however, some signs that markets are working more effectively than they were a few weeks ago. This improvement partly reflects the substantial measures undertaken by central banks.

In Australia, the yield on 3-year Australian Government bonds is now around the target level set by the Board and the functioning of the government bond markets has improved. The Bank will do what is necessary to achieve the 3-year yield target, with the target expected to remain in place until progress is being made towards the goals for full employment and inflation. Since this target was introduced, the Bank has bought around $36 billion of government bonds in secondary markets, including bonds issued by the states and territories. The Bank will continue to promote the smooth functioning of these important markets. If conditions continue to improve, though, it is likely that smaller and less frequent purchases of government bonds will be required.

The Bank has injected substantial liquidity into the financial system through its daily open market operations to support credit and maintain low funding costs in the economy. It will continue to ensure that the financial system has sufficient liquidity. Given the substantial liquidity that is already in the system and the commencement of the Term Funding Facility, the daily open market operations are likely to be on a smaller scale in the near term. Operations at longer terms will continue, but the frequency of these operations will be adjusted as necessary according to market conditions.

The first drawings under the Term Funding Facility were made yesterday. This facility will help lower funding costs across the banking system and provides an incentive for lenders to support credit to businesses, especially small and medium-sized businesses. Authorised deposit-taking institutions have access to at least $90 billion in funding under this facility.

There is considerable uncertainty about the near-term outlook for the Australian economy. Much will depend on the success of the efforts to contain the virus and how long the social distancing measures need to remain in place. A very large economic contraction is, however, expected to be recorded in the June quarter and the unemployment rate is expected to increase to its highest level for many years.

The coordinated monetary and fiscal response, together with complementary measures taken by Australia's banks, will soften the expected contraction and help ensure that the economy is well placed to recover once the health crisis has passed and restrictions are removed. These various responses are providing considerable support to Australian households and businesses through what is a very difficult period. The Australian financial system is resilient. It is well capitalised and in a strong liquidity position, with these financial buffers available to be drawn down if required to support the economy.

The Board is committed to doing what it can to support jobs, incomes and businesses as Australia deals with the coronavirus. The comprehensive policy package announced last month will also support the expected recovery. The Board will not increase the cash rate target until progress is being made towards full employment and it is confident that inflation will be sustainably within the 2–3 per cent target band.

The Board wishes the best to all Australians as our country deals with this very difficult situation.”

 

The majority of Council’s investment portfolio (90%) is invested in deposits / securities with Australian Authorised Deposit taking Institutions (ADI’s).  Council has been taking advantage of term deposit “specials” from various institutions without overexposing the portfolio to any one institution. Note that the marked to market valuations on some of the direct investment products in Council’s portfolio remain at less than the face value of the investment.  The marked to market value of these investments is expected to be equal to or greater than the face value by the time they reach their maturity date.  Early exit from these products would realise losses.

 

The following chart compares Council’s portfolio yield with the benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index rate in each month for 2018/19 and 2019/20.

 

 

As shown in the chart above, Council’s portfolio yield has continually exceeded the benchmark AusBond 3 month Bank Bill Index due to the prudent investment of Council’s portfolio.

 

Under Reg 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, Council’s Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council each month with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Act.

 

Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 March 2020 is summarised below.

 

 

Details of Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 March 2020 are provided in attachment 1.

 

Consultation

Independent advice regarding the investment of Council funds was provided by Prudential Investment Services Corp and a portfolio review has been undertaken to ensure that the portfolio remains appropriate in the current environment.

 

The advice of Prudential Investment Services is that “Council has a well diversified portfolio of term deposits and bank issued bonds from the highest quality institutions in Australia.  No change in Council’s investment strategy is recommended in response to the current market conditions.”

 

Financial Implications

Council continues to invest those funds which, having regard to Council’s Resourcing Strategy 2017/18 – 2020/21 and adopted Operational Plan 2019/20, are not required to manage Council’s day-to-day cash flow or have been identified as required to fund specific future projects and expenditure or anticipated (budgeted) future commitments.

Interest earned is allocated to restricted cash and income in accordance with Council’s adopted budget, policy and legislative requirements. Accrued interest to 31 March 2020 was $499,004.15

The chart below compares actual interest received to date with budgeted interest for the year.

Interest for the month of March represented a decline of 0.21% vs the bank bill benchmark of 1.18% pa for the month which has affected the year to date result. In particular returns from the Floating Rate Note component of Council’s portfolio have been impacted by fluctuation in the market as at the close of month. The drop in returns has been largely re-couped at the time of writing this report.   

The Reserve Bank of Australia has continued to keep interest rates low and the expected investment income has been reviewed as part of Council’s March Quarterly Budget Review processes.

Certification

I hereby certify that Council’s investments have been made in accordance with Sec 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General Regulations) 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Clair Hardy

Chief Financial Officer

WOLLONDILLY SHIRE COUNCIL

 

Attachments

1.       March 2020 Investment Summary Report     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

19 May 2020

 

16        Notice of Motion/Rescissions

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17        Closed Reports   

No reports this meeting

18        Questions for Next Meeting

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