Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

16 June 2020

 

 

 

 

Date:

Tuesday, 16 June 2020

Time:

6.30pm

Location:

Council meeting to be held remotely using audio visual link and open to members of the community via webcast.

 

Supplementary AGENDA and Attachments

 

Issued: 12/06/2020

§  Amended Item 10.1 - Mayoral Minute.

§  Amended Item 15.3 – Adoption of the 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget.

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

16 June 2020

 

Ben Taylor

Chief Executive Officer

Order Of Business

10       Mayoral Minute. 4

10.1          Mayoral Minute. 4

15       Efficient and Effective Council 6

15.3          Adoption of the 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget 6

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

16 June 2020

 

10          Mayoral Minute

10.1       Mayoral Minute

File Number:           10619-2#284

 

Recommendation

1.       That Council explores the opportunity to be co signatories to the Gundungurra Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) and a report come back from Council with a way forward to do this.

2.       That a report come back to Council on options for playground upgrades to Birrahlee Park, Yanderra.

3.       That the update on key events attended by the Mayor or Councillors over the past month as outlined in Attachment 1 be noted.

 

 

This Mayoral Minute provides an update on key events attended by the Mayor or Councillors over the past month (Attachment 1) and also seeks Council endorsement to progress two current issues.

1.       Gundungurra Indigenous Land Use Agreement

 

Unfortunately this year due to the impacts of COVID, recent reconciliation week activities could not be held as usual. However, this led to constructive conversations with the Gundungurra community which highlighted the need to work closer as a Council with our indigenous communities.

 

I believe a positive step as a Council would be to revisit the Gundungurra Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) with the Gundungurra people.  We acknowledge that the Gundungurra people identify themselves as successors of the traditional owners and have lived in this country for thousands of years. A way to formally recognise and acknowledge this is to explore the opportunity to become co signatories on the indigenous land use agreement that has already been signed by State Government agencies and the Blue Mountains City Council.

 

I would like to recommend that Council explores the opportunity to be co signatories and that a report come back from Council with a way forward to do this.  This will demonstrate our willingness to build and strengthen our relationships with the indigenous community.

 

2.       Birrahlee Park, Yanderra

 

Following a recent onsite visit by myself and Cr Michael Banasik with Yanderra residents to inspect the playground and surrounding space at Birrahlee Park, Yanderra I would like to request a report from Council on options for playground upgrades to Birrahlee Park, Yanderra.  This is a local level park which last had some upgrades carried out back in 2013, this park has a nice natural setting which could be improved by further upgrades such as exercise equipment and updated play equipment for the benefit of the local community.

 

 

Matthew Deeth

MAYOR

June 2020

 

Attachments

1.       Mayoral Minute - 16 June 2020   


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

16 June 2020

 

MAYORAL MINUTE

 

 

 

During the past Month the following events were attended by either myself or as indicated by other Councillors.

 

Tuesday 26 May 2020 COVID 19 LGNSW Forum attended by myself

 

Tuesday 26 May 2020 Business Community Taskforce Meeting attended by myself and Councillors Judith Hannan, Michael Banasik and Blair Briggs

 

Thursday 28 May 2020 Regional NSW Taskforce Meeting attended by myself

 

Thursday 28 May 2020 Wollondilly Shire Local Planning Panel Meeting attended by myself

 

Sunday 31 May 2020 Meeting to discuss The Great Burragorang Valley Walk attended by myself and Deputy Mayor Matt Gould

 

Wednesday 3 June 2020 Rural Industry Liaison Committee Meeting attended by myself, Deputy Mayor Matt Gould and Cr Judith Hannan

 

Thursday 4 June 2020 Regional NSW Taskforce Meeting attended by myself

 

Thursday 4 June 2020 Western Sydney City Deal Mayoral Forum attended by myself

 

Tuesday 9 June 2020 Virtual Citizenship Ceremony attended by myself

 

Wednesday 10 June 2020 Picton Road Motorway Coalition Campaign Launch and Media Call attended by myself and CEO Ben Taylor

 

Thursday 11 June 2020 Meeting with Representative from Warradale Men's Shed attended by myself, Deputy Mayor Matt Gould, Cr Judith Hannan, Michael Malone and Vickie Tierney

 

Thursday 11 June 2020 Business Community Taskforce Meeting attended by myself and Councillors Michael Banasik and Blair Briggs

 

 

Matthew Deeth

MAYOR

June 2020

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

16 June 2020

 

15          Efficient and Effective Council

15.3       Adoption of the 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget

File Number:           10619-2#296

 

Executive Summary

This report recommends Council adopt the 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget. This Plan includes the annual budget, fees and charges, and sets out the activities and projects that are planned to achieve the commitments made in Council’s adopted Delivery Program 2017/18 – 2020/21.

As required under the Local Government Act 1993, Council has publicly exhibited the draft Plan to seek community comment prior to formal adoption of the final document by 30 June 2020. The comments received are addressed in this report.

The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are continuing to impact our community and the way that Council and all other organisations do business. The estimated impact on Council’s finances from the recent bushfires, floods and now Covid-19 is in the order of $7.8m.

Council is focussed on continuing to provide the services that our community relies upon in a fiscally responsible manner whilst also kick-starting the local economy to support our community during this challenging period.

This Plan focusses on economic recovery through the delivery of Council’s largest ever capital works program and through initiatives and actions that support economic stimulus and job creation within our community. It also provides certainty to the community that Council services will continue and our assets will be appropriately managed. In addition, Council will introduce a number of key initiatives to improve our road and streetscape management, enhance service levels and provide more online options for customer service.

The 2020/21 Operational Plan and budget has been revised to incorporate the economic impacts that we have seen to date and to reflect the anticipated ongoing impacts of the pandemic. Council’s forecast income has been reduced by an additional $3.2M since the draft Budget in April 2020 and this is offset through savings in wages and salaries as well as contracted services, together with savings through a revision of the Capital program.

Planned expenditure has been carefully re-considered to ensure that it is being directed at the appropriate areas and can support plans to enhance service levels and increase efficiency within Council, despite the anticipated significant reductions in revenue streams. Any further impacts realised after the adoption of the plan will be considered and reported through the normal quarterly reporting processes in the 20/21 financial year.

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Adopt the Delivery Program 2017/18 – 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget, incorporating the changes recommended in this report

2.       Notes the Operational Plan includes the continued focus on high quality services and kick-starting the economy to support local jobs during this challenging period, including Council’s highest ever $33.6 million investment in road and other infrastructure renewal and upgrades, and the following key priorities to enhance Council’s service to the community:

(i)      Increased asphalt repairs across the road network through the incorporation of an additional crew to operate existing equipment at increased capacity

(ii)      Enhanced public streetscapes through cost effective a public bin servicing initiative bringing the function in-house at lower cost than currently delivered

(iii)     Increased Swimming Pool Safety inspections enhancing the safety of our community

(iv)    Improved environmental outcomes and compliance within our Shire by creating a structure that enables an even more proactive approach to regulatory services

(v)   Moving to an Integrated Service Delivery Platform to enhance the customer experience for dealings with Council and to deliver greater efficiencies across Council processes

3.       Make the rates and charges for the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 as detailed in this report.

4.       Make the annual charges for the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 as detailed in the exhibited draft Delivery Program 2017/18 – 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget.

5.       Adopt the exhibited draft Schedule of Fees and Charges 2020/21, as detailed in the exhibited draft Delivery Program 2017/18 – 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget with the amendments contained within this report. Any increases to Children’s Services fees and charges for 2020/21 be deferred and the waiving of the parent levy continues until the 27 September 2020 as advised by the Commonwealth Government – Department of Education Skills and Employment to meet their conditions to access transition payments.

6.       Approve the budget as detailed in the exhibited draft Delivery Program 2017/18 – 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget including the amendments contained in this report and on that basis, formally vote these funds for the 2020/21 financial year.

 

Report

The Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) framework for local governments is effectively another name for what most of us would call business planning.

In June 2018, Council adopted the full suite of IP&R documents, as follows:

·        Community Strategic Plan 2033

·        2017/18 – 2026/27 Resourcing Strategy

·        2017/18 – 2020/21 Delivery Program

·        2018/19 Operational Plan (including Fees & Charges)

The Integrated Planning and Reporting Guidelines require that the Community Strategic Plan, Resourcing Strategy and Delivery Program all be reviewed every four years. The development and adoption of an annual Operational Plan (including operational and capital budget, revenue policy and fees and charges) is required to be undertaken annually.

The Operational Plan is Councils 1 year breakdown of the 4 year program of work outlined in the Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21.

The draft 2020/21 Operational Plan deliverables align with the strategies identified in the Community Strategic Plan. The Operational Plan allocates responsibilities and resources for each action/activity and details targets and measures to determine our progress towards achieving the Community Strategic Plan outcomes.

The draft Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget was placed on public exhibition from 16 April to 28 May 2020 to provide the Community the opportunity to give their input on the proposed plan. Council received two submissions.

 

 

 

Impacts of Covid-19

The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are continuing to impact our community and the way that Council and all other organisations do business. Council is focussed on continuing to provide the services that our community relies upon in a fiscally responsible manner whilst also kick-starting the local economy to support our community during this challenging period.

This Plan focusses on economic recovery through the delivery of Council’s largest ever capital works program and through initiatives and actions that support economic stimulus and job creation within our community. It also provides certainty to the community that Council services will continue and our assets will be appropriately managed.

The 2020/21 Operational Plan and budget has been revised to incorporate the economic impacts that we have seen to date and to reflect the anticipated ongoing impacts of the pandemic. The estimated impact on Council’s finances for 2019/20 and 2020/21 from the recent bushfires, floods and now Covid-19 is in the order of $7.8m.

Council’s forecast income has been reduced and this is offset through savings in wages and salaries as well as contracted services, together with savings through a revision of the Capital program. This is detailed further in this report below.

Planned expenditure has been carefully re-considered to ensure that it is being directed at the appropriate areas and can support plans to enhance service levels and increase efficiency within Council, despite the anticipated significant reductions in revenue streams. Any further impacts realised after the adoption of the plan will be considered and reported through the normal quarterly reporting processes in the 20/21 financial year.

 

Continuing to invest in quality services and priority infrastructure

The Wollondilly Operational Plan 2020/21 continues Council’s focus on providing high quality services for our community.

The Budget has been prepared based on a continuation of all current services, plus a significant $33.6 million investment in Council’s infrastructure to reduce our backlog and provide new much-needed infrastructure for the community, the biggest in Council’s history. This includes:

·    $17.9 million in improvements to road infrastructure

·    $7.1 million on open space projects

·    $1.6 million on community buildings

·    $8.2 million on a new Cultural and Community precinct

·    $1.2 million on plant, stormwater and waste assets.

This investment will directly provide jobs and economic activity across Wollondilly to boost the local economy.

In addition, the Australian Government has allocated $872,871 to Council from the new Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program to bring forward projects that are to be delivered before June 2021. The specific additional projects for this funding will be determined by Council in the coming month.  

 

Proposed service improvements for the Wollondilly community

We are passionate about making Wollondilly Council the best council in Australia.  So even in these tough times we are determined to make substantial improvements.  With that in mind we have identified a number of initiatives to enhance Council’s service to the community: 

1.       Increased asphalt repairs across the road network through the incorporation of an additional crew to operate existing equipment at increased capacity

2.       Enhanced public streetscapes through cost effective a public bin servicing initiative bringing the function in-house at lower cost than currently delivered

3.       Increased Swimming Pool Safety inspections enhancing the safety of our community

4.       Improved environmental outcomes and compliance within our Shire by creating a structure that enables an even more proactive approach to regulatory services

5.       Moving to an Integrated Service Delivery Platform to enhance the customer experience for dealings with Council and to deliver greater efficiencies across Council processes

These projects and initiatives are either self-funding or will have a positive impact on our service to the community.

 

1. Increased asphalt repairs across the road network through the incorporation of an additional crew to operate existing equipment at increased capacity

Council’s Transport Asset Management Plan sets out the biggest ever road maintenance, repair and upgrade program in Wollondilly history for our +850km road network. Council has already doubled the road repair budget to $12.5M in 2019/20 and it is proposed to be $18m in 2020/21.

This program is making a difference and our roads are improving, however with such a large road network there is always more work to do. This investment will further increase our pavement maintenance.

Currently, council predominantly uses the Jet-patcher to undertake urgent pothole repairs to minimise the ingress of water into the granular pavements and prevent ever expanding pavement failures.  These pothole repairs are intended to hold the pavements together until our patching, re-sealing and pavement reconstruction programmes can deliver the longer term pavement solutions.

Council also uses a pavement repair truck, known as the Flocon, for asphalt pavement and edge-break repairs.  The draft budget includes an additional amount of $580,000 to enable the employment of additional staff and purchase of materials so this plant can be utilised more consistently throughout the year. This will deliver more asphalt repairs across the road network, allowing for a larger number of patches to be completed each year. 

 

2. Enhanced public streetscapes through cost effective a public bin servicing initiative bringing the function in-house at lower cost than currently delivered

We have been monitoring and modelling our costs for street and park bins. Replacing, emptying and cleaning the more than 185 x 50 litre bins and 86 x 240 litre wheelie bins across Wollondilly Shire, as well as the 10 skips bins used to aggregate rubbish from the 50 litre street bins. This is a significant cost for the community and we want to make sure we effectively manage these costs.

Our modelling indicates that we are approaching the threshold where a once-off capital investment for a new waste compactor truck and installation of 240 litre wheelie bins as street and park bins across the shire is required. This will be funded from a ‘Waste Less, Recycle More’ grant from the NSW Environmental Protection Authority.

In addition, using operational savings from the change will enable a cost-neutral increase in our service levels for the community and also deliver a significant reduction in Work Health & Safety Risks for our staff.  The draft budget will enable the delivery of this significant service and safety improvement in the 2020/21 financial year.

 

3. Increased Swimming Pool Safety inspections enhancing the safety of our community

The safety of our community is of the utmost importance.  By inspecting more pools we will increase public safety.  This initiative is for a self-funding Swimming Pool Safety program.  We will increase our annual inspection rate to at least 10% of the swimming pools in the Shire in line with our adopted Swimming Pool Inspection program.

4. Improved environmental outcomes and compliance within our Shire by creating a structure that enables a proactive approach to regulatory services

Currently Council’s compliance functions are reactive only due to currently available resources.  This initiative will enable a more proactive approach to be taken to compliance.  It includes compliance team changes and additional resourcing to enhance investigative and compliance functions, including ranger services, additional environmental health resources and a development application audit function.  The initiative will improve environmental outcomes and compliance within the Shire.

 

5. Moving to an Integrated Service Delivery Platform to enhance the customer experience for dealings with Council and to deliver greater efficiencies across Council processes

Council is implementing new software that we have already demonstrated will make a quantum leap forward in both our business efficiency and our customer service.  Through this investment in technology we are digitising a myriad of manual processes which will improve value for money for our ratepayers and ensure that we can support the imminent growth of our community.  For the first time we will be able to offer many of our services online and our customers will be able to access our services from anywhere and at any time.

 

Operational Budget

The budget continues to include funding for delivery of all of Council’s existing services through the use of anticipated revenues from fees and charges, rating income and ongoing grants.

The 2020/21 Operational budget includes revised income estimates after factoring in the recent impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and offsetting reductions in expenditure on items that were able to be reduced without impacting on planned service levels or the enhancements proposed at the time of exhibiting the plan.

Revenue:

Council’s forecast income has been reduced by $3.219 million reflecting anticipated reductions to the following sources of revenue:

·    User Charges and Fees

 

The amended budget recognises that the anticipated growth in services will be significantly impacted by the effects of COVID-19 which are likely to directly affect the ability of our community to make payment for Council services. It is also anticipated that the ongoing safety and social distancing measure will further limit usage of some services. A total of $3.003 million decrease in revenue has been reflected based on the following :

Advertising in Council publication

$0.048M

Microfilming fee income

$0.020M

Development application income

$1.067M

Building fees and charges income

$0.355M

Health and regulatory inspections and  fines income

$0.202M

Stall holder fees

$0.014M

Children’s services income

$0.250M

Hire fees for halls, parks and reserves

$0.234M

Tipping fee income

$0.709M

Royalty income

$0.100M

•     Interest and Investment Revenue

 

The Reserve Bank of Australia continues to hold cash rates at 0.25% without any indication of a rise on the near future. In its statement on Monetary policy of 2 June 2020 the Board stated that “...the outlook, including the nature and speed of the expected recovery, remains highly uncertain and the pandemic is likely to have long-lasting effects on the economy”.

This income was reduced significantly for the draft Budget. A further reduction of $0.139 million in interest and investment revenue has been forecast

•     Other Operating Revenues - $0.144M decrease

An additional reduction of $0.144 million has been incorporated as a reflection of changes to timing of payments and anticipated reductions in other revenue sources as follows:

Event sponsorship income

$0.054M

Rental income due to rent deferrals

$0.041M

Merchant fee income

$0.010M

Plant sales

$0.015M

 

Expenditure

In response to the revisions to anticipated income levels, management have undertaken a review of the original budget in order to identify opportunities to reduce expenditure without limiting Council’s ability to continue to deliver key services and the initiatives previously recommended which are anticipated to enhance service levels.

As a result of this review the following amendments have been made:

•     Employee costs

A reduction of $0.357 million by freezing recruitment of non-critical positions, reducing overtime and freezing senior staff salaries

•     Materials and contracts

A reduction of $1.005 million as follows:

revisions to contracted works

$0.351M

deferral of Illuminate 

$0.128M

Reduced general materials purchases

$0.118M

Software licensing cost savings

$0.075M

Revision of subscriptions and memberships

$0.041M

Expenditure on catering

$0.023M

Reduced need for document storage

$0.021M

 

•     Consultancy costs

A reduction of $0.054 million has been made after removing funding for outsourcing studies in the Infrastructure and Planning Directorates

•     Other Expenses

A reduction of $0.143 million has been identified reflecting current year cost saving initiatives relating to printing and photocopying costs, removal of the requirement to advertise development assessment approvals in print media and the deferral of the end of term election to the 2021/22 financial year.

 

Capital Works Program

The Major Works Program for 2020/21 has been reduced to $33.682 million reflecting the advanced completion of some of the planned works in the 2019/20 financial year. The revised program remains the largest investment in infrastructure in Council’s history, incorporating:

•     $17.9 million in improvements to road infrastructure,

•     $7.1 million on open space projects,

•     $1.6 million on community buildings,

•     $8.2 million on a new Cultural and Community precinct, and

•     $1.2 million on plant, stormwater and waste assets.

This investment will directly provide jobs and economic activity across Wollondilly to boost the local economy.

 

Updated performance measures and layout

The finalised Delivery Program 2017/18 – 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget incorporates an amendment to highlight the strategic and operational measures that that will be used to report on Council’s progress throughout the period.  This section has been added since the exhibition period and can be found in section three of the plan.  This framework should be considered as a living part of the operational plan.  As we move forward the rolling out the performance framework we will see changes to these measures on a monthly basis.

The draft Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget that was placed on exhibition was presented in draft format and did not incorporate any imagery to enhance its visual display. The document format has now been amended to incorporate this imagery and present a more polished view of the content.

In addition, during the exhibition, some minor amendments to the Delivery Program 2017/18 – 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget were identified and it is proposed that these changes be made to the document. These changes (such as typographical updates, layouts, format) do not alter the intent or direction of the document and as such do not impact on the exhibition process.

 

Setting the Rates

Wollondilly Shire Council has adopted an ad valorem rate structure with a minimum rate. As additional valuation adjustments, category amendments and supplementary valuations were received during the exhibition period the proposed ad valorem rates for 2020/21 have been revised as follows:

 

 

 

 

2019/20

2020/21

Category

Sub-Category

Ad Valorem Rate

Minimum Value

Ad Valorem Rate

Minimum Rate

Residential

Rural Residential

0.351630

1,456.00

0.301999

1,493.00

Residential

Residential Town Centre

0.425679

1,339.00

0.388928

1,373.00

Residential

Residential Other

0.353637

1,456.00

0.303106

1,493.00

Farmland

Primary Production

0.237548

1,237.00

0.193039

1,269.00

Business

General

0.753289

1,456.00

0.578432

1,493.00

Business

Light Industrial Centres

0.538812

1,456.00

0.354979

1,493.00

Mining

Mining Activities

8.808206

1,456.00

2.294697

1,493.00

 

In accordance with the provision of Section 535 of the Local Government Act 1993, it is necessary for Council to carry a resolution which formally makes the 2020/21 Rates and Charges.

In addition to the statutory pensioner rebate (Section 575 of the Local Government Act), all eligible pensioners are offered a further voluntary $45 reduction of rates and 50% reduction of the Domestic Waste Management Charge.

Rates can be paid by instalment and the anticipated due dates for the 2020/21 year are 30 September 2020, 30 November 2020, 28 February 2021 and 31 May 2021.

Council recognises that there are cases of genuine financial hardship that may cause ratepayers to have difficulty paying their rates and charges or other sundry debts. The Local Government Act 1993 and the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 allows Council to provide a range of assistance to ratepayers experiencing genuine financial hardship. This information and a streamlined hardship application process is available by contacting Council or via the website.

Setting Annual Charges

Under the existing Waste Collection Contract, Council is able to offer ratepayers a variety of bin size options. The annual charges associated with each of the available bin options are detailed in the Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget.

Stormwater Management Charge

The Stormwater Management Charge assists Council to undertake works that will provide improved quality of stormwater being discharged into waterways. The charge is proposed to remain unchanged from 2019/20 amounts. The proposed charge and associated works are clearly defined within Council’s Asset Management Plan and 2020/21 Operational Plan.

Proposed Interest on Overdue Rates and Charges

The interest rate that may be charged by Council on overdue rates and charges is the rate as set by the Minister for Local Government. The rate for the 2020/21 financial year is 0.0% from 1 July to 31 December 2020 and 7.0% from 1 January 2021 until 30 June 2021. The rate for 2019/20 was 7.5% for the full year.

In accordance with section 566(3) of the Local Government Act 1993, Council will apply the maximum interest rate as determined by the Minister for the period in question.

 

 

 

 

Fees and Charges

Council has adopted a number of fees and charges for the wide and varied services that it provides to the community.

In deciding who pays for goods and services, and to what extent, it is necessary to determine whether the service benefits the general community and/or individuals, i.e. the proportion of community versus private benefit.  Each fee and charge’s category has been identified within the Operational Plan using the following categories (denoted by letters)

a.       The price for this service is to make a minimal contribution towards the cost of providing this service. The majority of costs of this service are met from general income.

b.       The price for this service is set to recover annual operating and maintenance costs, but does not contribute towards the replacement of assets in providing service.

c.       The price of this service is set to recover annual operating and maintenance costs, and to make a contribution to the replacement of assets used in providing the service.

d.       The price of these goods or services is set to generate an appropriate return on capital invested.

e.       The price charged is a refundable deposit against possible damage to infrastructure, footpaths, kerb, gutters and roadways, buildings, parks and reserves caused by adjacent development or use of facilities.

f.       The price charged for these goods or services is set by regulation.

 

These categorisations were not visible on the exhibited document however they are unchanged from previous years.

 

A list of amendments to the recommended fees and charges included in the draft Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget is being prepared and will be included in the revised version of this report.

 

Consultation

Preparation of the draft Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget commenced in December 2019 as each section of Council considered their strategies and actions. This information has been incorporated into the Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget document which has continued to be reviewed and refined with Executive and Councillor input.

At the 21 April 2020 Council Meeting, Council endorsed the draft Delivery Program 2017/18 - 2020/21 including 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget to be placed on public exhibition to provide the community with an opportunity to provide relevant feedback to Council on the plans for the year ahead. The exhibition period was advertised on Council's website from 22 April to 28 May 2020.

Details of submissions received and the recommendations of staff are shown in the below table:

 

Submitted By

Submission

Action / Recommendation

Councillor

Bonds and deposits be waived for Emergency Services training and meeting bookings

The proposed schedule of fees and charges have been amended to reflect this request

Community member

P9.  Instead of ‘advocate for more employment land at Wilton’ consider:

a)   Undertake an assessment of employment land needs for all towns and villages, and land suitable for a wide range of industries. 

b)   Provide an assessment of land requirements to address the current and future shortage in job diversity and access to local employment.

 

Council is currently undertaking a broader employment lands study as part of our work program which addresses this issue.

In addition, a new approach to precinct planning has been developed to provide certainty and a way forward for precincts. This is part of the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment’s work to centre the planning system around people, places, public spaces and the environment, putting greater responsibility for planning in the hands of councils and local communities.

Parts of Wilton will be a State-led rezoning approach include the important town centre, while other parts of Wilton 2040 will be planned through collaborative exercise. It is considered Council should continue to advocate for appropriate employment lands in Wilton in addition to the broader assessment of employment lands across the Shire.

 

P16. Question: What will a ‘Hazard analysis and emergency management study’ produce exactly?  Can this be reworded so we understand what the outcome of the study will be.

As outlined in Action 18.12 of the local strategic Planning Statement, this study in partnership with emergency service agencies will evaluate the threats and risk level from both natural and manmade hazards and establish appropriate management.

 

P19. Instead of ‘assist DPIE to prepare a DCP for precinct at Wilton, reword to be more proactive and in control.  For example:

a)   Work with the community and Council to provide best practice recommendations to DPIE on suitable development controls for Wilton in  areas of climate change, management of heat island effects, water and sewerage management expectations, subdivision design with emergency management in mind etc..  (This is necessary as our community submissions were not considered when the WSE DA was determined. We need to get ahead of the game and be proactive).

b)   The vegetation management development controls for land adjoining E2 land in Wilton is exhibited and finalised by June 30 2020.

·    Note: the controls may already be drafted.  Under the Growth Centres SEPP it is the responsibility of the consent authority to provide vegetation management controls for land adjoining E2.  The E2 is the Koala corridor.  It is necessary to understand this ahead of any further DA stages as this may impact the current urban design for stages 3,4,5 and 6 which all adjoin E2 land. If this is not done upfront, Walker will argue for the weakening of vegetation management controls because they have a statutory housing yield which has to be met.

c)   Work with DPIE and the developers to prepare the neighbourhood plans for stages 3,4, 5 and 6 to ensure the developer has certainty on the  necessary biodiversity constraints and is able to redistribute yield in earlier stages if necessary.

Noted and taken on board for the specific work program rather than being detailed in the operational plan.  As above, Council is working collaboratively with the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) in preparation of the DCP which will include controls to address environment, social and economic matters.  

Note: Neighbourhood Plans are prepared by the proponent and are reviewed by Council and DPIE.

Council has no say on the specific timing for the DCP or other State planning decisions in Wilton.

 

 

P21 Instead of ‘participate in Wilton Priority Growth Area meetings, consider:

a)   Prepare town planning principles and/or  formal business case arguments  for DPIE to consider in respect to the following matters (e.g 30 April 2018 resolutions + water)

a.   An integrated health care precinct (primary, secondary and tertiary)  of not less than 10 hectares

b.   Achievement of 1 full time job for each Wilton dwelling

c.   Retail hierarchy development controls

d.   Deferred release of land until Council finalises its shire wide Koala Plan of Management and conservation strategy

e.   Deferred release of land until the business case for accessing local employment and public transport is suitably provided and assessed.

f.    ADD:  DPIE provide certainty on new water resources, taking into account long-range climate and growth forecasts, and drought scenarios,  to ensure growth can be managed at no cost to government, and new infrastructure does not adversely impact on housing affordability and consumer charges.  (note IPART have deferred the Prospect to Macarthur pipeline, seeking improved information and consideration of alternatives.  They now also intend to have a higher cost for greater Sydney bulk water purchases during drought conditions).

Council has made a number of resolutions on the priority infrastructure for Wilton and these remain Council policy and are a core part of Council’s work to ensure appropriate infrastructure, employment and environmental protection as Wilton grows.

The operational plan is not an appropriate mechanism to relist Council resolutions or specific work program points or it would become unwieldy due to the volume of resolutions. 

The matters are noted, and Council will continue to actively participate and engage with DPIE, landowners and the community to create vibrant, sustainable and healthy communities in Wilton.

 

 

P29 What does it mean ‘gateway infrastructure such as Hume Highway Picton Interchange and Picton Bypass’?  This needs to be expressed to show what outcome the action is achieving. 

In respect to gateway infrastructure is it possible to add:

a)   Provide DPIE with a business case to support the preparation of a gateway masterplan for the Picton/Wilton interchange that encourage travellers to visit the wider areas of the Shire, promoting tourism and supporting viability of local town centres.  Development costs to be funded under development contribution plans and RMS highway maintenance.

·           Note: this is necessary, as Wilton will remove the image of rural lifestyle, and will become a sponge for retail and other activities, sending other towns and villages into further economic decline.

 

Council has made a number of resolutions on the priority infrastructure for Wilton and these remain Council policy and are a core part of Council’s work to ensure appropriate infrastructure, employment and environmental protection as Wilton grows.

The comments are noted and will be taken on board for the specific work program. The gateway infrastructure is a critical element for the planning for Wilton and Wollondilly.

Neighbourhood plans provide an appropriate mechanism to address some of these matters.  Some of these matters are also a consideration for the controls within the DCP and within the zoning for the town centre (which is a matter for the State Government to consider in the State Led process).

 

 

In addition, the Strategic Resourcing and Advisory Committee comprising of Councillors has been consulted through a number of workshops prior to finalising the Plan.

Financial Implications

The 2020/21 Operational Plan and Budget includes the allocation of resources required to deliver the services and projects to the Community for the upcoming year. Revisions undertaken during the exhibition period have recognised the significant detrimental impact to Council’s revenue stream as a result of COVID-19 however a considered review of planned expenditure to offset the reduction, has resulted in a revised Budget that remains able to sustain Council’s service levels and proposed enhancements to service without significant revision to the exhibited actions and deliverables.

 

Attachments

1.       2020/21 Operational Plan   


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

16 June 2020

 

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