You are invited to attend the next Ordinary Meeting of Council:

 

Date:

Tuesday, 21 July 2020

Time:

6.30pm

Location:

To be held remotely online via Audio Visual Link and Open to the Public via Webcast

 

AGENDA

 

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

21 July 2020

 

 

 

Ben Taylor

Chief Executive Officer

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

Order Of Business

1         Opening. 5

2         Recording of the Meeting. 5

3         Webcast Notice. 5

4         National Anthem.. 5

5         Acknowledgement of Country. 5

6         Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests. 5

7         Declaration of Interest 5

8         Confirmation of Minutes. 5

9         Items to be Tabled. 5

10       Mayoral Minute. 6

10.1         Mayoral Minute. 6

11       Sustainable and Balanced Growth. 7

11.1         Voluntary Planning Agreement for 30 Tickle Drive, Thirlmere. 7

11.2         Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee - June 2020 Meeting Minutes. 9

11.3         Sydney PeriUrban Network of Councils 2020 Action Plan. 10

11.4         Draft Wollondilly Local Housing Strategy. 13

12       Management and Provision of Infrastructure. 15

12.1         Amendment to Telopea Park Master Plan. 15

13       Caring for the Environment 18

No reports this meeting

14       Looking after the Community. 19

14.1         Adoption of the Economic Development Strategy. 19

14.2         Western Parklands Councils Delivery Program 2020-21. 28

14.3         Exhibition of Draft Library Strategy 2020 - 2026. 31

15       Efficient and Effective Council 34

15.1         Exhibition of the Draft Code of Meeting Practice. 34

15.2         Internal Audit - response to opportunities for improvement 36

15.3         Community Forum Guidelines Review.. 40

15.4         Farmland Rating Policy. 42

15.5         2020 Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination. 43

15.6         Investment of Funds as at 31 May 2020. 44

16       Notice of Motion/Rescissions. 48

16.1         Notice of Motion - Update on the Outer Sydney Orbital 48

16.2         Notice of Motion - Koala Management Plan. 49

16.3         Notice of Motion - Classification of Agricultural Land Community Forum Presentation. 50

16.4         Notice of Motion - Parking Fee at Burragorang Lookout 51

16.5         Notice of Motion - Fast Tracking of Wilton New Town. 52

17       Closed Reports. 53

17.1         Quarterly Legal Status. 53

18       Questions for Next Meeting. 54

No reports this meeting

 


1          Opening

Legislative changes to the Local Government Act section 747A now permits Council meetings to be held remotely using audio visual link and is open to members of the community via webcast.

2          Recording of the Meeting

In accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice the electronic recording of the Council Meeting and the use of electronic media during the proceedings is not permitted. This includes devices such as laptops, mobile phones, tape recorders and video cameras.

3          Webcast Notice

Members of the public are advised, in accordance with Section 18 of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (PPIPA), that Wollondilly Shire Council records and webcasts live all Ordinary and Extraordinary Meetings of Council held in open session for the purpose of facilitating community access. The webcasts are publicly available for viewing on Council’s website.

Video footage collected is of the decision making body only.

The webcasts and webcast recordings are protected by copyright and owned by Council. No part of the proceedings of a meeting of the Council may be recorded, copied or made available to others by members of the public without the authority of the Council.

Council may be required to disclose recordings pursuant to the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

4          National Anthem

5          Acknowledgement of Country

The Mayor will acknowledge the traditional Custodians of the Land.

6          Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests

7          Declaration of Interest

8          Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting - 16 June 2020

Extraordinary Council Meeting - 30 June 2020

9          Items to be Tabled

Disclosure of Interests Register – 2019/20

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

10        Mayoral Minute

10.1       Mayoral Minute

File Number:           12275#15

 

Recommendation

That the Mayoral Minute be accepted.

 

The Mayor may put to a meeting (without notice) any matter the Council is allowed to deal with or which the Council officially knows about.

Attachments

Nil  

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

11        Sustainable and Balanced Growth

11.1       Voluntary Planning Agreement for 30 Tickle Drive, Thirlmere

File Number:           10619-2#259

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the outcomes of the public notification of the Draft Voluntary Planning Agreement (Draft VPA) for 30 Tickle Drive, Thirlmere.

The result of the Planning Agreement is to provide an all-weather public road, which will serve as an emergency evacuation route for residents between Tahmoor and Thirlmere during hazard events, providing a benefit to the community.

The Draft VPA is associated to an approved 6 lot rural residential subdivision which was approved in May 2019.

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Adopts the Planning Agreement attached to this report;

2.       Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to Execute the Planning Agreement on behalf of Council; and

3.       Accepts the dedication of the road as provided for in the Planning Agreement.

 

Report

A Draft VPA has been prepared under Section 7.4 of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979. The draft VPA is associated with a development application DA/2017/18 for land at 30 Tickle Drive, Thirlmere.  The application received development consent on 30 May 2019 for a 6 lot rural-residential subdivision. The Draft VPA proposes the partial offset of development contributions that would otherwise be payable under the development consent as follows:

·            Construction of an all-weather public road in accordance with Council specifications and agreed plans

·            Dedication of the road to Council

·            Payment of $26,940 Development Contributions.

The road connection is not identified in any planning documents and is not required to cater for the 6 lot subdivision. However, during the assessment of the development application, a rural road was proposed to provide a safe emergency evacuation route for the 29 properties on Hilton Park Road and Grey Gums Place. In the event of bushfire or flooding from Myrtle Creek, the locality could become land-locked and isolated, with no other means of safe egress. If the proposed road connection is constructed and dedicated to Council, a safe evacuation route via Tickle Drive to Thirlmere will become available.

While the proposal is a diversion from usual practice, it offers material public benefit in the form of an emergency evacuation route for a land locked locality. In accordance with Section 7.4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, the offer is considered to be for a proper public purpose.

 

 

Council’s recently finalised Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS), Wollondilly 2040, identifies the risks associated with limited emergency evacuation routes for communities within the Shire as a whole. The December 2019 bushfires highlighted these risks, with major traffic jams in Thirlmere, Tahmoor and Bargo putting many people at risk had the fire changed direction at that time.  Planning Priority 18 of the LSPS notes that when considering appropriate locations for development, Council must acknowledge which areas are exposed to hazards, and plan for appropriate buffers and safe evacuation. This new road supports this important consideration for this locality.

Based on recent Quantity Surveyor advice undertaken as part of the Contributions Plan Review, alternative access arrangements could cost in excess of $769,000 (and possibly more given the location and topography). Section 7.11 contributions payable by the developer for this application would have been approximately $100,000. An offset value of $73,060 has been applied for the proposed roadworks. As such the Planning Agreement will provide a material public benefit in the order of 10 times the offset value.

In summary, this is a relatively simple planning agreement and is being prepared because it is the only legal means for Council to accept the works from a developer outside of the Section 7.11 process.

Consultation

The draft planning agreement was publicly notified between 8 April 2020 and 6 May 2020 in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000. No submissions were received.

Financial Implications

The Draft Agreement will have positive benefits for Council. It will provide a fully constructed all-weather public road which will act as a vital emergency evacuation route, as well as $26,940 in monetary contributions, delivering a public benefit in excess of what would otherwise have been provided through the payment of contributions alone.

Attachments

1.       Draft VPA for 30 Tickle Drive Thirlmere    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

11.2       Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee - June 2020 Meeting Minutes

File Number:           12275#1

 

Executive Summary

The Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee is a Committee established by Council consisting of members representing rural landowners. The Committee meets quarterly. The Committee’s purpose is to:

a)      Provide feedback on Planning Proposals and Development Applications which are likely to impact (positively or negatively) on agricultural production.

b)      Facilitate communication between industry and various levels of government. 

c)       Create and support opportunities and initiatives that will enhance agricultural production.

To ensure that the work of the Committee is brought to the attention of Council and the Wollondilly community, Committee minutes and recommendations will now be reported to Council.

The purpose of this report is to present the minutes and recommendation of the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee meeting held on date 3 June 2020.

Recommendation

That Council notes the following recommendations of the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee meeting of 3 June 2020:

1.       That the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee requests that the minutes of each meeting be circulated by email, to all members of RICAC for adoption, as soon as possible to meet the deadline for the following month Ordinary Council Meeting.

2.       That the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee minutes be accepted by email.

 

Report

The Committee have requested the minutes be captured in the following month’s Ordinary Council Meeting following the Rural Industry Advisory Committee Meeting.

Council officers confirm their commitment to finalising the minutes as soon as possible after each Committee meeting.

Financial Implications

The costs associated with Council’s Advisory Committees are covered within Council’s operational budget. The costs associated with implementing the recommendations can be absorbed within the current budget.

Attachments

1.       Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - 3 June 2020    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

11.3       Sydney PeriUrban Network of Councils 2020 Action Plan

File Number:           12275#10

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of Wollondilly's participation in the Sydney PeriUrban Network of Local Councils (SPUN).

Wollondilly Shire Council continues to chair and provide secretariat support for the Network and participates in the initiatives and project research opportunities of the Network. This has included the development and implementation of objectives and terms of reference for the Network and the review and development of the 2020 Sydney PeriUrban Network (SPUN) Action Plan.

SPUN has become a platform for PeriUrban Councils to share knowledge and good practice, strengthen the strategic capacity of Local Government through regional resource sharing and the development and implementation of solution focused initiatives.

 

Recommendation

That Council 

1.  Note the work that the Sydney PeriUrban Network (SPUN) has completed to date and continues to support and be a member of SPUN.

2.  Endorse the 2020 Sydney PeriUrban Network (SPUN) Action Plan. 

 

Report

Through the Sydney PeriUrban Network of Councils (SPUN) partnership and networking has been implemented to develop better relationships, greater understanding to manage conflicts and develop tailor-made policies and solution focused initiatives for issues impacting upon PeriUrban areas in the Greater Sydney Area. The network has been and continues to be, an advocate for broader understanding and awareness of the challenges communities in NSW PeriUrban areas are facing.

Currently 1.19 million people live in our SPUN member Council areas and this is expected to grow significantly into the future.

Peri-urban lands typically comprise a mix of urban and rural residential areas with productive agricultural lands, biodiversity areas and diverse topographies.

Because of their location they face a unique set of challenges:

•     Management of growth and development pressures.

•     Agricultural land being lost to urban development and land fragmentation.

•     Conflicts being rural and urban land uses.

•     Limited infrastructure and services.

•     Limited employment opportunities.

12 Councils on the periphery of the Sydney Metropolitan Area form The Sydney Peri-Urban Network of Councils (SPUN). The Network includes the following Councils:

Blue Mountains

Hawkesbury

Penrith

The Hills

Camden

Hornsby

Shellharbour

Wingecarribee

Central Coast

Kiama

Shoalhaven

Wollondilly

 

Peri-urban areas such as Wollondilly have enormous environmental, economic and social value and are critical to the future resilience and functioning of Sydney as a whole, therefore they need to be carefully managed and protected. Wollondilly Council, along with the 11 other Councils on the periphery of Sydney works to stimulate discussion and strategic approaches to the management of Sydney’s peri-urban fringe.

Wollondilly Shire Council’s involvement in SPUN aligns with the following Strategies and Actions in the Create Wollondilly Delivery Program and Operational Plan:

·    GR6.1 Chair and coordinate the Sydney Peri-Urban Network

·    GR7.2 Protect vital agricultural lands in the Wollondilly Shire - Advocate and leverage opportunities to progress PeriUrban Resilience Strategies

·    EN7.3 Pursue Agricultural Enterprise Credits Scheme - Leverage opportunities to implement an Agricultural Enterprise Credit Scheme through a sub-Working Group

Wollondilly Shire Council chairs and coordinate the Sydney Peri-Urban Network and participates in sub-working groups.

Since the first meeting on the 13 September 2013, SPUN has been meeting on a quarterly basis and much has been achieved over this period of time.

SPUN has become a platform for PeriUrban Councils to share knowledge and good practice, strengthening the strategic capacity of Local Government through regional resource sharing and solution focused initiatives.  SPUN has also become a strong advocate for a broader understanding and awareness of the challenges communities in NSW PeriUrban areas are facing and has had an impact in resilience planning, particularly relation to productivity and economic outcomes and climate impact initiatives.

SPUN has had a seat at the table at the Greater Sydney Commission’s roundtable sessions, been a member of the Commissions Environmental Panel and Rural Lands Technical Working Group, and participated in the development of thought leadership papers and development of a Blue Green Infrastructure Framework with the Commission. The Network has participated in Sydney Water’s Customer experience planning sessions and influenced research opportunities through the PeriUrban Landscape studio at University NSW and the University Technology Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF).

The Network has reviewed and updated its actions and priorities and developed a new 2020 Sydney PeriUrban Network (SPUN) Action Plan. The Action Plan identifies the key issues confronted by PeriUrban areas and outlines why these areas are so valuable.

 

Three interrelated priority themes for action in the plan include:

·    Value the peri-urban – better recognition and understanding of value and significance

·    Framework for Protection – legislation, policy settings and other innovative mechanisms

·    Knowledge – evidence based decisions and approaches.

 

The diagram following illustrates the interconnectedness of these three themes. A new framework for protection and management can only be achieved if the value of these lands is understood and widely recognised, and both of these themes are in turn dependent on sound knowledge.

SPUN continues to meet on a quarterly basis implementing the Networks objectives and terms of reference and has reviewed the Networks Action Plan. The actions in this plan will be considered and where appropriate incorporated into member Council’s initiatives, implemented by the SPUN members and/or associated working groups of SPUN. SPUN will also encourage all sections of our community and all relevant agencies to pursue these actions and incorporate them in their own strategic planning processes.

Consultation

SPUN Member Councils

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       2020 Sydney PeriUrban Network of Councils Action Plan    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

11.4       Draft Wollondilly Local Housing Strategy

File Number:           12275#36

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council support to exhibit the draft Wollondilly Local Housing Strategy.

The draft Wollondilly Local Housing Strategy (LHS) provides guidance and direction for new housing supply in Wollondilly over the next 20 years. The Affordable Housing Short Paper should be read alongside the draft LHS and provides a summary of the analysis on affordable housing demand and supply in Wollondilly, including the key indicators for affordability.

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) ‘Local Housing Strategy Guideline and Template’ clearly mandates and drives the content of the draft LHS. The draft strategy has been prepared to comply with DPIE’s guidelines and template and demonstrates an evidence base, identifies priorities for local housing and outlines key actions for Council to undertake in implementing the strategy.

The Strategy preparation has been funded by the NSW Government’s Accelerated LEP Review Program. Under this agreement, Council is required to submit the Local Housing Strategy to DPIE before 30 September 2020.

Council will be briefed on the draft Strategy on 7 July. This Council Report will be updated and re-issued following this briefing and prior to the Council meeting.

Recommendation

1.       That Council supports the public exhibition of the draft Wollondilly Local Housing Strategy.

2.       That Council notes that following the exhibition, the outcome of the consultation along with any recommended modifications will be reported to Council.

 

Report

Background – Accelerated LEP Review Program

In response to a number of planning related announcements and legislative changes introduced by the NSW Government, Wollondilly along with other Councils within the Greater Sydney Region are required to undertake a review of their local environmental plans (LEPs).

The purpose of the LEP Review Program is to update the Wollondilly Local Environmental Plan 2011 (WLEP 2011) to give effect to the Western City District Plan through upfront strategy planning.

The LEP Review program is being undertaken over six phases and includes seven main project deliverables as follows:

1.       Submission of LEP Review Report (completed in November 2018);

2.       Submission of Project Plan (completed in January 2019);

3.       Submission of draft Local Strategic Planning Statement (completed in September 2019);

4.       Completion of Local Housing Strategy and specialist reports;

5.       Submission of final Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) (completed in February 2020);

6.       Submission of Planning Proposal to the Department for a Gateway determination (completed in December 2019); and

7.       Submission of draft LEP to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to make the plan.

This report relates to project deliverable 4.

Wollondilly is one of 13 priority Councils selected on the basis of their opportunity to bring forward housing supply and housing diversity by updating local environmental plans to reflect District Plans. The priority Councils include high growth Councils in the new Western City Deal.

As a priority Council, Wollondilly was offered and has signed a funding agreement with the NSW Government to receive up to $2.5 million to fund this review in an accelerated timeframe. As part of this agreement the Local Housing Strategy component of the LEP Review (the deliverables noted above) is to be submitted to the Department for endorsement before 30 September 2020.

This tight timeframe means that the draft Wollondilly Local Housing Strategy needs to be progressed and exhibited ahead of the other specialist studies currently being progressed as part of the LEP Review Program.

Local Housing Strategy

The purpose of a local housing strategy is to establish a Council’s vision for providing housing in in a local government area. They will detail how and where housing will be provided in local areas.

The Greater Sydney Region Plan and the Western City District Plan both require councils to prepare housing strategies with the Department’s Local Housing Strategy Guidelines and Template setting the approach and standard format for their preparation.

An updated report on the Draft Wollondilly Local Housing Strategy, including attachments, will be provided shortly in a supplementary agenda.

Consultation

In accordance with Schedule 1 of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act, 1979 it is proposed that the draft Local Housing Strategy will be publically exhibited for a minimum period of 28 days.

The public exhibition process will seek feedback from the community, stakeholders and industry on the draft Local Housing Strategy. The outcome of the public exhibition and any necessary modifications to the draft Local Housing Strategy will be reported to Council for consideration in September 2020.

Financial Implications

Funding of up to $2.5 million for the LEP Review Program is available for this program through the Accelerated LEP Review Program subject to contractual conditions.

The project plan is structured to manage delivery in accordance with allocated funding.  An internal steering group consisting of all members of the Executive oversees the program.  However, the broad scope of the LEP Review project, along with new requirements generated from the changes to the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979, continues to have a significant impact on strategic planning resources.

Attachments

Nil  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

12        Management and Provision of Infrastructure

12.1       Amendment to Telopea Park Master Plan

File Number:           12275#4

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s consideration for an amendment of the Telopea Park Master Plan adopted in March 2019 allowing for the installation of a Rural Fire Service (RFS) Fire Truck Memorial Playground within the park.

The request for a memorial playground at Telopea Park was raised by the Buxton community as a fitting tribute to RFS volunteers, Mr Andrew O’Dwyer and Mr Geoffrey Keaton, who tragically lost their lives on 19 December 2019 in their efforts to protect the community from the Green Wattle Creek Bushfire.

A process of community engagement was undertaken in relation to the proposed RFS Fire Truck Memorial Playground, including the families of the lost firefighters, and the feedback received through the engagement was one of overwhelming support.

Funding is confirmed for the project and it is proposed that Council adopt the amended Telopea Park Master Plan, which now includes the new RFS Fire Truck Memorial Playground, enabling the project to commence.

Recommendation

1.       That Council adopt the amended Master Plan for Telopea Park.

2.       That all participants in the engagement process be thanked warmly for their contributions, particularly the community advocates responsible for securing external funding for the project.

 

Report

Following a process of community engagement, Council adopted a Master Plan for Telopea Park in March 2019 by way of delegation to the Central Ward Councillors.  The Master Plan provides a clear, community-informed vision for the future of the park and helps Council to identify and secure budget, prioritise work and communicate with stakeholders.

Since the adoption of the Master Plan, a number of Master Plan improvements have been completed including:

·        Construction of a new public amenities facility

·        Installation of a barbecue

·        Formal pathways

·        New children’s playground.

Following the adoption of Master Plans, there are times when residents and user groups make requests to Council for various park facilities.  Such requests are initially reviewed against adopted Master Plans to ensure consistency.  Where proposals are of merit; however, and are not identified on an adopted Master Plan, Council may amend the Master Plan by way of resolution.

In January 2020, members of the Buxton community requested that a RFS Fire Truck Memorial Playground be installed at Telopea Park to pay tribute to Horsley Park Rural Fire Service’s Deputy Captain Geoffrey Keaton and Firefighter Andrew O'Dwyer.  The two men tragically lost their lives on 19 December 2019 in their efforts to protect our community from the Green Wattle Creek Bushfire.

At its Extraordinary Meeting on 11 February 2020, Council indicated support for the proposal and resolved to allocate funding from the Commonwealth Government’s $1 million Recovery Grant towards ‘a suitable memorial to honour the memory of Deputy Captain Geoffrey Keaton and Firefighter Andrew O'Dwyer who tragically lost their lives in Buxton protecting our community’.

To facilitate the request, a process of community and key stakeholder engagement commenced in March 2020 based on the proposal.  The engagement included targeted key stakeholder consultation along with wider community consultation through an online survey.

The outcome of the engagement confirmed overwhelming community support for the proposal and identified the preferred location for the new playground within the park.  Additionally, many respondents suggested the inclusion of some park seats and plaque/s specifically dedicated to the two firefighters.  A report on the community engagement is provided as Attachment 1.

The Telopea Park Master Plan has now been amended to include:

·        RFS Fire Truck Memorial Playground with shade provision, landscaping and park seating (including memorial plaque/s)

·        Update of the existing playground with the selected design and allowing for future shade structure provision

·        Adapting the connection routes between some of the facilities due to minor changes required during construction.

These amendments are shown in Attachment 2 as the updated Master Plan for Telopea Park and it is now presented to Council for adoption.

Further, parallel to the community engagement process, community advocates successfully secured various external funding that is required for the playground equipment and their selfless hard work and enthusiasm towards the realisation of this project is to be commended.

Subject to the adoption of the amended Master Plan, installation of the new playground could be completed by 30 October 2020.

Consultation

Consultation activities were carried out between March and May 2020:

·        Workshop with Councillors

·        Meeting with Sturt Noble, designers of the Telopea Park Master Plan

·        One-on-one engagement with a total of 17 phone interviews undertaken in April 2020 with key stakeholders, including families of the fallen firefighters

·        Online community survey available on Council’s Your Say Wollondilly webpage between 1 May 2020 and 18 May 2020.

Financial Implications

It is estimated that the new RFS Fire Truck Memorial Playground project will cost $281,800 (inclusive GST) including:

·        $240,000 - Supply and installation of playground including rubber softfall and shade structure

·        $  41,800 - Project management and contingencies.

Funding has been allocated and is available from the Commonwealth Government’s $1 million Recovery Grant for the Wollondilly Shire as resolved on 11 February 2020 (Resolution 2/2020) and the committed donations.  The mechanism for utilising the donations is currently being finalised.

The ongoing annual maintenance of the playground will be managed within existing annual budget.

 

 

Attachments

1.       Telopea Park Memorial Engagement Report  

2.       Updated Master Plan for Telopea Park     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

13        Caring for the Environment

No reports this meeting


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

14        Looking after the Community

14.1       Adoption of the Economic Development Strategy

File Number:           10619-2#289

 

Executive Summary

A new Economic Development Strategy has been prepared for the Wollondilly Shire. The strategy articulates the role of the Council in economic development as well as set clear objectives, strategies and actions to achieve the collective aspirations of council and the community. It provides for a Council-wide approach to economic development as well as collaborative efforts with partner organisations including relevant State and Commonwealth agencies, local business and other stakeholders.

The focus of the strategy is setting out a clear pathway to build the local economy and create thousands of local jobs over the coming years to benefit all of Wollondilly. Extensive background research and consultation has been undertaken to support the Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy 2020.

The draft Strategy was placed on public exhibition from 20 May 2020 to 17 June 2020 seeking feedback from the community, business and government. A total of five submissions were received and reviewed. A number of amendments have been made in the final Economic Development Strategy 2020 and these are outlined in the report.

The strategy will be supported through a detailed implementation plan currently under development. The plan details how the strategy will be implemented in the short, medium and longer term to deliver the aspirational target of 15,000 new local jobs for Wollondilly over the next 20 years.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Adopt the Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy 2020.

2.       Note the community feedback received and write to all participants to thank them for their involvement.

 

Report

Council adopted its current Economic Development Strategy (EDS) in 2015. Since this time, much has changed and a number of recent developments have occurred, including the new Western Sydney Airport, Aerotropolis, Agribusiness Precinct, Proposed M9 Corridor, Western Sydney City Deal and projected population growth.

A new economic development strategy has been developed to capitalise on recent economic, infrastructure and population trends as well as the recent major developments which will impact the future growth potential of the Shire.

In December 2019, Council engaged a suitably qualified and experienced consultant to review the current economic development strategy, other major strategies and plans as well as the above mentioned projects and activities to develop a new Economic Development Strategy for Wollondilly.

The new strategy articulates the role of the Council in economic development as well as set clear objectives, strategies and actions to achieve the collective aspirations of council and the community.

It provides for a Council-wide approach to economic development as well as a collaborative efforts with partner organisations including relevant State and Commonwealth agencies, local business and other stakeholders.

The goal of the strategy is to facilitate the creation of 15,000 new local jobs for Wollondilly over the next 20 years.

Extensive consultation was undertaken with Council and other community stakeholders resulting in the development of the following:

·    Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy – Background Report

·    Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy – Consultation Summary

·    Wollondilly Draft Economic Development Strategy.

The strategy will be supported through a detailed implementation plan which details how the strategy will be implemented in the short, medium and longer term to deliver the aspirational target of 15,000 new local jobs for Wollondilly over the next 20 years.

It is recommended that Council adopt the Economic Development Strategy 2020.

Consultation

The draft Strategy was placed on public exhibition from 20 May 2020 to 17 June 2020 (28 days) seeking feedback from the community, business and government. A total of five submissions were received and reviewed. The submissions are included in the table below and further detailed in the Consultation Summary Report.

SUMMARY OF FEEDBACK / COMMENTS

STAFF RESPONSE

·    Consider capitalising on the nearby University of Sydney – Brownlow Hill and EMAI – Menangle, to create agribusiness employment – Wollondilly could be ‘silicon valley’ for agriculture

·    Consider coordinating the tourism accommodation in Wollondilly to include historic properties, buildings and gardens

·    Need for more accommodation to cater for the Sydney market.

The University of Sydney – Brownlow Hill Campus is only a few kilometres from Camden, however it is in the Wollondilly Shire and specialises in agriculture and veterinary sciences. Consideration will be given joint projects and partnerships in the development of the implementation plan

The EDS already references the Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute (EMAI) (Page 10, Strengths). 

The EDS will be amended to reference the University of Sydney on Page 10.

Feedback regarding tourism accommodation will be considered by the Tourism Department.

 

·    The draft EDS takes advantage of having an international airport in close proximity

·    Noted references to agricultural enterprises that will increase domestic and international exports

·    Noted intention to expand tourism offering to enhance inbound tourism potential for the airport and the shire

·    Noted potential for increased connectivity to the airport to increase employment opportunities and improve provision for ’30 minute city’

·    Acknowledges that appropriate land zonings and incentives are key to attract business and industry of all sizes.

Positive feedback noted.

No change to the EDS.

·    Request to include various properties within the Moreton Park Road area of Menangle and Douglas Park as part of the Greater Macarthur Growth Plan 2040 / Area.

The EDS does not determine land zoning. No change to EDS.

Recommended that Council to write to the author/s to advise that their submission has been forwarded to the Strategic Growth team for information.

·    15,000 employment target too low (for all Wollondilly) as this was the target for Wilton New Town (only)

·    Need to acknowledge poor public transport in Wollondilly.

·    Need to attract professional employers into the area

·    Relying on Wilton New Town (which may not eventuate) to be developed in the term of this EDS is risky and as such this EDS should not rely on Wilton New Town

·    Need to address worsening traffic conditions for workers / commuters

·    Draft EDS does not describe the current economy -

·    Need to consider the opportunities, needs and challenges of the ageing population

·    Need to acknowledge climate change into the strategy

·    Add targets into the plan to be delivered when the implementation of the action plan is developed.

Comments acknowledged, however no change recommended to EDS as issued more appropriately considered as part of land use planning.  

The goal of EDS 2020 is to create 15,000 new local jobs for the Wollondilly Shire.

Infrastructure advocacy is a key focus of Council and the specific issues will be included in the Implementation Plan.

Most of the comments relating to traffic congestion, public transport, job growth, economic climate, land zoning (Wilton New Town) and general employment etc are already considered in the EDS.

The Wollondilly Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) - Wollondilly 2040 provides:

- A vision for land use planning over the next 20 years

- An overall structure plan

- Planning priorities

- Actions for each planning priority

- Details on implementation and monitoring

Eighteen planning priorities grouped under four themes - Infrastructure & Collaboration; Liveability; Productivity and Sustainability will shape how Wollondilly achieves its land use vision. Climate Impact is addressed by these planning priorities detailed in the LSPS.

·    Wants to see more in the strategy through research and evidence to provide clear direction and certainty

·    Wollondilly is facing a ‘rural decline’ through changing consumer demands, globalisation, internet and large-scale shopping formats – real challenge for this region

·    Wilton New Town will have an impact on the viability and vitality of existing towns and villages

·    Big employment generation opportunities and managing shopping centre decline should be the focus of the strategy

·    Focus needs to be on ‘economic planning’ first before it invests in ‘economic development’

·    Economic planning requires matters like market and trade catchment research, analysis of employment land requirements, drivers causing economic decline, audit of employment generating assets, and consultation with the people who need employment and improved growth.  None of this seems to have been properly done. 

·    The plan states Wollondilly is 1 hour from Sydney – untrue from Bargo to Sydney is 2 hours and 15 minutes by train and probably similar by car

·    Claim to being a 30 minute city is untrue

·    Each catchment within the shire requires an individual assessment and likely individual strategies

·    We need to look at what expanding urban areas will do for our economy. How should they be designed

·    In summary, I believe the strategy needs to move away from repeating ideas that exist in other plans, and produce a more tangible, evidence-based action plan.  For example, list 5 key economic directions that have been researched and consulted with community, and show how they will be implemented, including the financial resources required. This current plan is so aspirational that most of it is likely to fail. What are the top priorities that we can logically do now, instead of waiting for an implementation plan?

·    Infrastructure for tourism has to be affordable into the longer term. There is no point creating the Burragorang Valley walk if we can’t afford it and there is no market for it. Where is the market research for this?

·    We need 15,000 local jobs minimum for Wilton. How many do we need for existing population? What type of jobs do we need to provide for? What amount of land do we need? Without this evidence the strategy is pie in the sky.

·    Has the evidence on local job shortages taken into account those people, particularly young people, who have relocated permanently out of the area to gain access to jobs, education and entertainment?

·    What is the strategy for employing women over 50?

·    What proportion of council employees are local?

·    What employment programs can be run to ensure higher recruitment rates of local people, particularly young people?

·    Tahmoor mine employs its skilled labour mainly out of Wollongong. I was also advised by a mine official that they mostly procure from outside the Shire. How can this be addressed?

·    Address the generation of employment at Badgerys Creek Airport – doesn’t make sense to people in Bargo and Yanderra who are primarily serviced by Southern Highlands

·    Wollondilly is a very large shire, it can’t be blanked with a one-size fits all approach, and that all towns and villages will face the same issues and have the same / equal opportunities

·    A desktop strategy does very little to identify the organic opportunities for business generation. The best form of economic development is one that grows from the special features of the people and the resources that naturally exist

·    The strategy states community consultation but does not state when and where

·    To have a good strategy, you need to consult with existing industry and describe the features of a place and its people

·    The strategy also needs to respond to evidence of economic inhibitors. For example, what is the strategy for water security and sewerage? 

·    This region features biodiversity, water, rural lands, bushwalks, local produce, mining, freight corridors, rail, very high proportion of small business, and struggling town centres with majority of people working out of area. How do we turn natural stuff into opportunities? For example:

·    Industry that needs proximity to major freight corridors and coastal, Sydney, and regional centres.

·    Rural land that can be used to develop a regional waste precinct, leading innovative practices

·    Rural land that can be used for urban fringe cemeteries and adjoining land for associated uses, chapels, flower gardens

·    The Australian Wildlife Foundation has the opportunity to become a major flora and fauna sanctuary, are there other reserves that can be developed? How do we make the Picton Botanical Garden iconic? I recall a reptile show at Wirrimbirra attracted thousands of day trippers.

·    Are there government and commercial water agencies that could be lured to Wollondilly – as this is where Sydney’s Water comes from?  What are the synergies with water and business?

·    Can we provide education tours of mining black coal?

·    Where can our existing leisure and recreation areas cater for major concerts, sport and street events?

·    How can we grow our local passion for participation into sport, into opportunities for regional/state/national sporting events?  For example, BMX, mountain biking, road cycling, rock climbing,

·    There is room for another Bowral or Berrima, providing surrounding assets and features are well utilised and ‘beautiful’.

·    We have lots of ‘wanna be’ entrepreneurs, who would love to work at home or close to home. My view is a smart hub is an outdated concept. Again where the consultation that shows a smart hub is what the rate payers want? What we need to do is to ensure that existing businesses remain resilient and have opportunities to grow the number of people they employ. The Pheasants Nest produce is a local success story in this regard. COVID has taught us that we need as many jobs as possible to be permanent salary positions.

·    Do we have interesting history or legends that should be showcased

·    You refer to Wollondilly becoming more suburbanised, is this true?

·    Bowral has a successful main street because it is unique in its surrounds and offers a lot of unique shops – the EDS needs promote uniqueness not a leisure experience e.g. Bunnings and Woolworths

·    Develop uniqueness through consultation on the ground – not ‘Have your say’

·    Agribusiness needs good roads, signage, willing farm participation, unique and quality product, and efficient and affordable DAs. 

·    The concept of agribusiness has been tried before and not succeeded.  Before supporting this as a strategy, it needs more evidence-based investigation on feasibility and cost to implement.

·    Council needs to push for the Water Sharing Plan to be updated and consulted locally, taking into account future housing growth.  Future water for agribusiness is dependent on water licences being granted. This is guided by the water availability and water sharing plans.  The shire is currently facing water scarcity due to housing growth.

·    Highway tourist detour signage is required at Wilton and Bargo

·    A gateway masterplan should be developed at Wilton using urban design responses and signage to promote tourists into the wider shire

·    The north bound Bargo exit ramp should only need a brown tourist drive sign to encourage highway motorists to jump off for a break.

·    More needs to be done to attract commercial tourism industries, such as adventure and sports. Land along Picton Road west and should be investigated to complement the go-karting enterprise and future loss of the ski-diving centre.  

·    Town planning policy work is required to turn things around. Analysis of retail geography (functions and trade catchments) is required, along with physical ground-truthing assessments of viability and vitality of village/town shopping centres

·    Town planning retail policy and marketing treatments can then be applied. 

·    Retail planning  policy is necessary to ensure out of centre and edge of centre supermarkets are avoided and floor space in minimised

·    Future motorway congestion will be an inhibitor to tourism travel.  It is necessary to look at the transport planning options for new freight routes to improve safety around the Wilton junction.

·    No housing land development strategies should be undertaken until the land required for industrial and commercial purposes is identified

·    Industrial and commercial businesses required relatively flat land.  It is disappointing that the LSPS did not attempt to identify these areas (Wilton), including those within the MRA

·    Protections need to be put in place in the LEP to ensure that the planned orbital does not generate further release of mass housing, adding to the congestion of motorways.  The riverine areas, and ecological valuable forest also need to be preserved in the LEP with sufficient urban buffer, to ensure the nature-based and rural tourism (among other things) is preserved

·    The strategy should explore the opportunity for Council to become a land developer to support an identified (evidence-based) opportunity for industry agglomeration. 

·    Our proximity to major health markets may present an opportunity to service the need, producing a unique agglomerating industry opportunity.

·    Our proximity to major health markets may present an opportunity to service the need, producing a unique agglomerating industry opportunity.

·    Whilst the poultry industry is growing organically due to the features of Wollondilly, it is also causing a nuisance, impacting roads and disrupting our rural outlook. Residents are burdened with poultry conflicts (odour and trucks)

·    Major employment industry will not come if there is no suitable land set aside

·    The Strategy does not address the likelihood of increasing number of empty shops 

·    An economic recovery solution is required to address flow on impacts of Wilton, including the potential to charge developer contributions to address the retail impact to towns and villages.

·    New visitor accommodation will not happen in declining town and village centres, unless there is a local and well supported nature-based, or commercial tourism activity that brings flow on effects back to these towns and villages, to ensure their sustainability

·    The park and ride will only be a winner if it reduces journey time, has more frequent services, and saves money. A study into the travel behaviour and needs of the local community will inform what is viable

·    Better to wait until the employment land strategy and actions develop before hiring a skilled position to facilitate development.  This will give the person a more targeted objective for securing industry.

·    The biggest risk to tourism is the decline in retail viability and vitality.  Investment in marketing should be minimal and measured for performance, until such time as individual viability and vitality plans for town and village centres is developed.  It will require a mix of urban analysis (function, behaviours), and other supporting strategies (land use planning, retail planning policy, industry attraction etc).

·    The strategy needs to be scaled back, removing untested aspirations.  It needs to address the requirements of ‘economic planning’ and seek the views of local communities across the various economic catchments. 

·    The completion should coincide with assessment and feasibility of employment land requirements taking into account future population growth. Ideas for growth should focus on organically derived opportunities that value the unique features of the Shire, and which are sustainable for Council to manage.

Feedback acknowledged, no change recommended to EDS.

Feedback however to be considered in the development of the EDS 2020 Implementation Plan.

In addition, feedback to be considered as through the development of an Employment Lands Strategy and other strategies under the LSPS

 

Financial Implications

Funding was allocated in the 2019-2020 operational budget to develop the Economic Development Strategy 2020. A number of programs, projects and activities from the implementation plan will be funded from 2020-2021 and future operational budgets. Where there is no funding available in operational budgets, detailed budget submissions will be prepared for consideration by Council. Additionally, funds will be sought through relevant grant, partnership and / or other funding programs.

Attachments

1.       Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy (2020) Final  

2.       Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy (2020) Economic Analysis Report Final  

3.       Wollondilly Economic Development Strategy (2020) Consultation Summary Final    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

14.2       Western Parklands Councils Delivery Program 2020-21

File Number:           12275#11

 

Executive Summary

The Western Sydney City Deal was signed by the Prime Minister, the Premier of NSW and the Mayors of the eight (8) Councils on 4 March 2018. 

The eight Councils of the Western Parkland City continue to implement initiatives from the Western Sydney City Deal and to collaborate on issues of regional significance for the benefit of the community.

The 8 Councils commitment to working collaboratively together was confirmed through the development of the Western Parklands Councils Relationship Framework that was adopted by Council at its Extraordinary meeting on 28 August 2018.

An inaugural Western Parklands Councils Delivery Program for the 2020-21 year has been developed to assist in strengthening the Western Parklands Councils partnership in the implementation of the commitments in the Western Sydney City Deal. 

This Delivery Program has been developed taking into account Wollondilly Shire Council’s Delivery Program and commitments within this program, regarding the implementation of the Western Sydney City Deal Commitments. 

 

Recommendation

That Council endorse the inaugural Western Parklands Councils 2020-21 Delivery Program.

 

Report

The Western Sydney City Deal was signed by the Prime Minister, the Premier of NSW and the Mayors of the eight (8) Councils on 4 March 2018. 

The Councils to sign the commitment to work collaboratively in a Western Sydney City Deal include Blue Mountains City, Camden, Campbelltown City, Fairfield City, Hawkesbury City, Liverpool City, Penrith City and Wollondilly Shire. The City Deal brings all levels of government together to plan for the new jobs, transport links, communities, green areas and services that will make the region an even better place to live.

The 8 Western Sydney City Deal Councils have collectively and consistently continued to meet with each other on a regular basis since the signing of the Deal. Meetings have continued to be productive, respectful and beneficial in allowing each Council to express their own unique community needs, while seeking to work and act cooperatively to progress the Western Sydney City Deal commitments across the Western Parkland City region.

The Western Sydney City Deal is identified as a Strategic Plan in Councils Delivery Program and Operational Plan and the Western Sydney Councils City Deal Group are identified as key stakeholders and external partners in the implementation of our Delivery Program.

The 8 Councils commitment to working collaboratively together was again confirmed through the development of the Western Parklands Councils Relationship Framework that was adopted by Council at its extraordinary meeting on 28 August 2018.

The framework formalises governance arrangements as a further evolution towards sustainable relationships between the Councils and the realisation of our shared objectives for the Western Parkland City. The principle functions of the Western Parklands Councils Relationship Framework are to:

·            confirm strategic regional priorities for the Western Parkland City and develop strategies and plans for delivering these priorities;

·            provide regional leadership for the Western Parkland City and be an advocate for shared strategic regional priorities; and

·            identify and take up opportunities for inter-governmental collaboration on matters relating to regional priorities including the Western Sydney City Deal.

The 8 Councils under this framework intend to work together to deliver long-term outcomes for the region and this inaugural Delivery Program for 2020 and 2021 will direct activity, strengthen the  partnership and clarify joint ambitions. It confirms commitment to improving collaboration between the three levels of government, delivering the City Deal initiatives and pursues our regional priorities for better transport and jobs.

The Western Parklands Councils Delivery Program 2020-21 draws on the community engagement processes undertaken by all the Councils in developing their community strategic plans and other local strategies. It also considers the commitments of the Western Sydney City Deal, the Western City District Plan and other important regional initiatives. The Delivery Program outlines the key actions the Councils will work on together during 2020 and 2021 towards the realisation of these longer-term plans for the region.

The Delivery Program is presented using the four themes identified in the framework for the Western City District Plan. These are:

·            Infrastructure and Collaboration

·            Liveability

·            Productivity

·            Sustainability.

Given the complexities of the Western Sydney environment, regular monitoring and reviews will be undertaken to ensure this “living document” responds to emerging issues and remains aligned with the Councils’ strategic directions. Through this delivery program the Western Parkland Councils will also seek opportunities to augment the existing actions when additional resources are secured for collaborative projects such as an arts and cultural facilities strategy, industry specific resources to support key sectors such as the visitor economy or further regional collaboration on implementation of the Resilient Sydney program.

The Western Parkland Councils will monitor delivery of the activities and projects outlined in this Delivery Program and report regularly to the member Councils and other key stakeholders. Performance measures will include the successful completion of projects to agreed costs and timeframes and a range of metrics that indicate community outcomes such as:

·            number of jobs in the region

·            average number of jobs within 30 minutes

·            share of households with active broadband connection

·            dwellings within 400m access to public open space

·            dwellings within 400m of public transport

·            residents completed tertiary qualifications.

The Councils will also oversee the development of an evaluation framework for the Western Sydney City Deal in partnership with the Australian and NSW Governments to review the output from the City Deal as well as evaluating outcomes and effectiveness of commitments implemented.

Complementing the actions outlined in this Delivery Program, the Councils will continue to support the governance arrangements for the Western Sydney City Deal and the operations of both the Western Sydney Planning Partnership and Western Sydney Health Alliance.

Wollondilly Shire Council has lead on the Western Sydney Health Alliance and at the development and implementation of the Digital Action Plan.

The Western Parklands Councils Delivery Program 2020-21aligns with the following strategies and actions in the Create Wollondilly Delivery Program 2017/18- 2020/21 and Operational Plan 2020/21:

·    GR2.5 Use Voluntary Planning Agreements to provide innovative planning outcomes - Leverage opportunities to implement Western Sydney City Deal 5G trial initiative to establish planning and infrastructure requirements for new developments

·    GR4.3 Seek improved public transport options - Participate in City Deal Process and continue to advocate for improved services from the State Government and Leverage opportunities to participate Environment in Smart Western City Program trials for integrated transport solutions

·    GR8.1 Continue to advocate for Council’s vision for a Great new Town at Wilton by ensuring a robust planning framework and suitable controls that meet current and future needs - Leverage opportunities to actively participate in Western Sydney City Deals 5G Trial

·    GR8.3 Advocate for agribusiness opportunities linked to the new Western Sydney Airport through the Western Sydney City Deals opportunities - Develop an advocacy plan in highlighting key opportunities in relation to agribusiness

·    IN5.2 Advocate for Regional Connectivity and Infrastructure projects that benefit the Wollondilly Community in the Western Sydney City Deal initiative - Regional Projects identified for Wollondilly

·    CO5.2 Advocate for a Regional Western Sydney Health Alliance that will enhance health service provision benefiting the Wollondilly Community through the Western Sydney City Deal initiative - Participation on the Western Sydney Health Alliance

·    CO5.3 Advocate for regional liveability projects that benefit the Wollondilly community in the Western Sydney City Deal Initiative - Participate in developing and implementing the priorities for the Western Sydney City Deal program

·    EC9.2 Participate in the implementation of the Digital Action Plan within the City Deal Digital commitments - Continued representation on the Western Sydney City Deal Lead Officers Group Program Coordination of Monthly Lead Officer meetings and working group input by relevant Managers Program Development of the Digital Action Plan within the City Deal Digital commitments. Project Participation in Digital Commitments Industry Engagement Incubation

With the ongoing commitment to working collaboratively for our region through the formation of the Western Parkland Councils this inaugural Western Parklands Councils Delivery Program for the 2020-21 year will assist in strengthening the Western Parklands Councils partnership in the implementation of the commitments in the Western Sydney City Deal.

Consultation

·    Western Parklands Councils Mayors and CEOs/GMs.

·    Lead Officers Group.

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       Western Parkland Council's Delivery Program 2020-21    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

14.3       Exhibition of Draft Library Strategy 2020 - 2026

File Number:           10619-2#110

 

Executive Summary

A draft Library Strategy has been prepared to chart a strategic direction for Council’s library services. The document outlines the key trends, challenges and opportunities facing our library services and particularly focuses on how to prepare for an expanded library experience as part of the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct redevelopment in Picton.

The purpose of this report is to seek a Council resolution for the Draft Library Strategy 2020 – 2026 to be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days.

Recommendation

1.   That Council place the Draft Library Strategy 2020 - 2026 on public exhibition for a period of 28 days to allow the public to provide feedback.

 

2.   That Council note a funding strategy will be prepared in the coming months before coming back to Council for adoption.

 

Report

Wollondilly Library Strategy 2020 - 2026 outlines the key trends, challenges and opportunities facing Council’s Library Service into the future.

The Strategy highlights how Wollondilly’s current Library Service compares with key benchmarks for library services in relation to population size. Overall Wollondilly’s Library Service falls significantly short in relation to a range of benchmark indicators, including:

·    Floor space per population size

·    Expenditure per population size

·    Staffing ratios per population size

·    Operating hours per population size.

Despite these benchmark comparisons, it has to be acknowledged that our Library Services are of a very high quality and are highly regarded by our community.

Council’s proposed Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct redevelopment in Picton will include new library facilities (post 2026 as part of one of the final redevelopment stages). These new library facilities will provide the opportunity to redress the shortfalls listed above.

Nevertheless the library service needs to transition towards the new premises over the next 6 or so years. So the Wollondilly Library Strategy 2020 – 2026 has a strong focus on this interim period, while at the same time establishing an exciting vision for library services beyond that time frame.

Key Elements of the Draft Strategy

The draft Strategy proposes a range of initiatives to be pursued over the next 6 years to prepare for an expanded library experience as part of the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct redevelopment in Picton. This includes:

·    Options to expand the library’s floor space (small-scale mobile and/or semi-permanent library annexe spaces)

·    Expansion in skilled staff

·    Options for expanded operating hours including the trialling of some possible 24 hour concepts

·    Building and expanding the library’s collections and programming across a range of media.

Other important strategic initiatives that have lesser direct relationship to the eventual new library development include:

·    Review and expansion of the mobile library service

·    Increased community engagement including the convening of a community panel

·    Developing stronger community partnerships, particularly with Aboriginal organisations and groups

·    Ongoing expansion of the library’s digital capabilities and offerings

·    Expanding the library’s role in supporting a “creative community” – e.g. writers festivals, music events, travelling art exhibitions etc.

·    Increasing the library’s capacity and role as “memory place” (i.e. custodian/curator of local history, identity and stories)

·    Ensuring the library explores opportunities to support and enable co-working hub concepts and small business development activities.

It is important to note that all of these initiatives are aspirational. Council’s capacity to deliver on any of these will evolve with consideration of:

·    Council’s funding capacity

·    Grant opportunities

·    Changing community needs and expectations as population grows

·    Any lasting impacts of Covid-19 on the “concept” of library services

·    Integration and opportunities arising from the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct redevelopment.

Consultation

The draft Strategy has been informed by targeted consultation with community stakeholders, Council staff and Councillors. The proposed exhibition will now provide an opportunity for all community members to view the Strategy and provide feedback. A multi-media approach to promote the exhibition will be undertaken and the draft strategy will be posted on Council’s online engagement platform, yoursaywollondilly.

Financial Implications

The draft Strategy proposes a range of initiatives and actions, many of which have potential financial implications for Council in the medium to long term. The details of these costs are yet to be modelled as this will require further consideration based on the following interrelated matters:

·    Community feedback on the draft Strategy

·    Refinement of each of the key proposals (i.e. what are the delivery options and the most cost effective way to deliver the desired outcome?)

·    Prioritisation and staging of initiatives over time, particularly in relation to the delivery and staging of the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct redevelopment in Picton

·    Funding options available (particularly grant funding) and Council’s financial capacity.

Note that Council is not required to make any decisions regarding financial commitment at this stage. Following the exhibition of the strategy a further report to Council will be prepared presenting a final version of the strategy. As part of that report a more detailed financial strategy will be prepared considering the matters listed above, as any decision by Council to adopt a final version of the strategy needs to be fully aligned with an understanding of potential financial commitments and implications.

 

Once the final Strategy is adopted the financial options relating to implementation will be able to be formally considered as part of the next Delivery Plan and Operational Plan preparation process (early 2021 in the lead up to the 2021/22 FY).

 

Attachments

1.       Draft Library Strategy 2020-26     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

15        Efficient and Effective Council

15.1       Exhibition of the Draft Code of Meeting Practice

File Number:           106#112

 

Executive Summary

The Code of Meeting Practice (Meeting Code) was recently reviewed to reflect ongoing trends in Council’s meeting practice.

To improve the flow of meetings Items by Exception was added to the standard order of business negating the need for the use of procedural motions to vary the order.

Motions to be considered in seriatim was added to provide clarity to this voting practice.

Clauses were added to clarify the calling of an extraordinary meeting consistent with the Act.

In light of the recent Pandemic and legislative amendments that affected provisions within our Meeting Code reference was added to show our commitment to adhering to any interim legislative measures that vary our Meeting Code between review periods.

 

Recommendation

That the draft Code of Meeting Practice be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days with a further 14 day submission period prior to coming back to Council for adoption.

 

Report

In June 2019 Council adopted our current Code of Meeting Practice incorporating the mandatory provisions of the Model Meeting Code put out by the Office of Local Government for Local Council’s in NSW.

A periodical review of the Meeting Code was now due in line with the Local Government Elections. While the elections have been delayed by 12 months a number of meeting practices have become a regular component of our Council meeting since the Meeting Code was last adopted. Subsequently a full review of the Meeting Code has been conducted at this time regardless of any legislative requirements.

The amendments made to the Draft Code of Meeting practice as attached are summarised below:

·    Items by Exception was added to the standard order of business to improve meeting flow

·    Motions to be considered in seriatim was added to provide clarity to this voting practice

·    Reference to our commitment to adhere to any interim legislative measures that vary our Meeting Code between review periods was added in response to the impact of the recent Pandemic on Council meetings

·    Clauses added to clarify the calling of an extraordinary meeting consistent with the Act.

·    Minor administrative changes to update the numbering of clauses and internal reference within the document to amended clauses.

Consultation

·    The Office of Local Government

·    Manager Corporate Governance and Risk

·    General Counsel

·    The Executive

 

 

 

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

 

Attachments

1.       Draft Code of Meeting Practice with track changes  

2.       Draft Code of Meeting Practice for Exhibition    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

15.2       Internal Audit - response to opportunities for improvement

File Number:           10619-2#124

 

Executive Summary

·        Internal Audit is a mechanism that checks the systems, procedures and policies used to carry out our business are robust and fit for purpose.

·        “Key Opportunities” are a way of identifying where improvements may be made to reduce risk to the organisation.

·        This report also provides further information regarding key opportunities identified in four audits carried out during the 2018/19 reporting period. This was requested by Council in resolution 303/2019 at the December 2019 meeting of Council

Recommendation

That Council receive and note the report.

 

Report

The Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) provides an annual report to the Council on its activities. Part of that report includes information on audits carried out which outline the positive findings and key opportunities for improvement.

The report was considered by Council at the December 2019 meeting where it was resolved that a further report come back to Council which shows progress updates and management response to the opportunities for improvement noted in the report.

The opportunities for improvement identified by audit and the management responses and progression of those opportunities, is contained in the table below.

 

Audit Area: Fraud and Corruption Prevention

Opportunity For Improvement Identified by Audit

Updated Management Response

Council should develop an annual fraud and corruption control program, outlining all planned fraud and corruption control initiatives and timeframes and undertake regular reporting against the program.

An initial action plan for the next 12 months will be developed by 30 June 2020. Following the risk workshops currently being facilitated by the Risk Management Officer a more detailed action plan including strategies to further mitigate high risk areas will be developed. The program will be reviewed and update annually thereafter. The Head of Integrity has since been appointed and will be assigned overall responsibility of the Annual Fraud and Corruption Program.

Council should complete a preliminary assessment of fraud and corruption risks to scope the Council’s future fraud control program. The risk assessment should be undertaken every 2 years to ensure new risks are identified and changes to the existing risks are captured and managed.

Operational risk assessments [including fraud risk] are to be conducted with all sections of council over the remainder of 2020. A program to update risk assessments every few years will be developed after the initial workshops have been completed. The Head of Integrity has since been appointed and will be assigned overall responsibility of the Annual Fraud and Corruption Program

Based on better practice, Council should consider introducing senior management performance measures on the successful implementation of the fraud and corruption control framework and initiatives.

KPIs for managers relating to fraud and corruption prevention will be considered and implemented as part of the new My Plan process. The Head of Integrity has since been appointed and will be assigned overall responsibility of the Annual Fraud and Corruption Program.

 

Council should implement regular communication, education and awareness program about preventing, detecting and reporting fraud and corruption.

The policy of the month initiative along with blended learning through face-to-face and online training modules will meet this requirement. Regular sharing of media articles and learnings from other councils also supplements the education and awareness program scheduled in the staff learning and development plan. E-learning training for staff has been developed and will be rolled out to staff by the end of the year.

Fraud and corruption frameworks, plans, initiatives and programs should be reviewed by the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee.

As new or revised components of Council’s fraud and corruption prevention framework are developed e.g. annual action plans and programs these will be reported to the ARIC. The Head of Integrity has since been appointed and will be assigned overall responsibility of the Annual Fraud and Corruption Program.

 

 

Audit Area: Plant and Fleet Management

Opportunity For Improvement Identified by Audit

Updated Management Response

Council should develop a plant and fleet strategy which is aligned with Council’s Community Strategic Plan and Council’s 6-year Works Program.

Council has engaged an external resource to review the draft Asset Management Plan and replacement schedule.

 

Council should align the 10-year Asset Replacement Plan with the plant and fleet strategy.

Council has engaged an external resource to examine plant and fleet and develop a long term, sustainable strategy going forward.

Council should explore the suite of reports available in Ausfleet to manage and monitor the plant and fleet operations.

Finance and fleet staff have commenced working on developing appropriate reporting.

Council should introduce Key Performance Indicators for the plant and fleet management operations and require regular reporting to senior management.

Finance and fleet staff have commenced working on developing appropriate KPIs.

Council should undertake an annual review of the weekly leaseback vehicle types to ensure the approved vehicle listing delivers the most cost effective leaseback vehicles.

This has been delayed due to other priorities arising from the bushfires and Covid-19.

The weekly leaseback rates for FY 2018/19 should be included in the Motor Vehicle Usage and Leaseback Procedure.

This has been completed.

Council should retain evidence supporting the computation of the revised vehicle leaseback charges.

Supporting documentation will be retained for each review.

Approval to change the leaseback charge should be documented and retained in TRIM, Council’s document management system.

Approval documentation will be saved in TRIM.

Council should ensure information supporting the charge out rate for the use of plant assets is held to support the distribution of plant costs.

Council has engaged an external resource to examine plant and fleet which will include a review of charge out rates.

Council should develop a plant and fleet management manual to support the management of the plant and fleet assets.

Council has engaged an external resource to examine plant and fleet which will include development of a plant and fleet management manual.

Council should consider undertaking a benchmarking exercise for in-house servicing of the plant and fleet vehicles.

Council has engaged an external resource to examine plant and fleet which will include a review of in-house servicing.

Council should undertake a cost-benefit analysis to support the decision to purchase a plant item. The analysis should be documented and held in TRIM to support the investment decision.

Finance and fleet staff have commenced working on developing an appropriate cost benefit analysis tool.

Audit Area: Procurement

Opportunity For Improvement Identified by Audit

Updated Management Response

Council should develop a strategic approach to managing procurement and incorporate this into a Procurement Strategy.

Completion of this review has been deferred due to the current demands on resources as a result of the recent natural disasters. The review will be re-activated once resourcing is available. It is anticipated that a decision on future approach to procurement will be made by December 2020.

 

Council should update the Purchasing Protocol and Tendering Guidelines in line with the adopted recommendations from the Procurement Audit.

Updates to the purchasing protocol and tendering guideline (which is a related procedure) have been made. These have not been formally adopted as yet as it would be preferable to align them with Council's approach to future procurement (see item above). However, a suite of standard tendering checklists and related documents has been developed and an internal training program added to the training calendar to assist staff with understanding of the process.

 

Council should update the Tendering Guidelines to cover requirements for tender specification development, composition of tender panels, conflict of interest declarations, development of tender assessment criteria, the processes for tender evaluation, probity management issues, reporting on tenders and the overall management of tenders.

An update has been made to the tendering guidelines and a suite of standard documentation implemented.

 

Council should give consideration to creating a centralised procurement position with responsibility for procurement strategy and policy review and development, staff training and advice on procurement systems and management of all tender processes.

There is currently no provision in Council's budget for additional procurement resources. However, resourcing will be reconsidered dependent on the proposed strategic approach to procurement currently under review.

 

Council should ensure that all tender specifications are checked thoroughly before the tender is advertised.

Tender specifications are checked by the appropriate officers prior to progressing.

 

 

Audit Area: Infrastructure Works and Maintenance

Opportunity For Improvement Identified by Audit

Updated Management Response

Council should review the process for developing cost estimates for projects to be included in the annual capital works program.

Process has since been reviewed and it is anticipated that improved communication and scheduling will increase the accuracy of estimates.

Council should conduct a formal review of unit rates each year and document the outcomes of this review.

A review will be completed before commencement of the 2020/21 works program.

 

 

Consultation

Consultation was undertaken with the Chief Finance Officer; Manager Infrastructure Strategy & Planning; Manager Works and Assistant Director People, Legal and Governance to provide progress updates.

Financial Implications

Resourcing implications will be considered through the usual budget process.

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

15.3       Community Forum Guidelines Review

File Number:           10619-2#298

 

Executive Summary

At the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 19 May 2020 it was resolved to place the Draft Community Forum Guidelines on public exhibition.

 

The exhibition period ran from 21 May to 18 June 2020. The submission period closed on 2 July 2020. No submissions were received.

 

Recommendation

That the Draft Community Forum Guidelines be adopted.

 

Report

A review of the Community Forum process was conducted by Council’s Corporate Governance team and the findings presented to Executive. The Executive endorsed webcasting the Forum.

 

A full review of the existing Community Forum Guidelines was conducted to accommodate webcasting and at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 19 May 2020 Council resolved:

 

1.      That the Draft Community Forum Guidelines be placed on public exhibition for 28 days with a further 14 days for submissions.

 

2.      That a report come back to Council following the submission period for the guidelines to be adopted.

 

The Draft Community Forum Guidelines were exhibited on Council’s website from 21 May to 18 June 2020. The submission period continued until 2 July 2020 with no submissions received.

 

The Draft Community Forum Guidelines as attached are now presented to Council for adoption.

 

A summary of the changes follows:

 

§  The addition of rules for Webcasting the Community Forum

 

§  Update to the date for Community Forums to the second Tuesday of the Month

 

§  Flexibility added in regard to presence at the meeting in exceptional circumstances

 

§  Detail added to the "Community Forum Rules of Conduct" on the expectations on how Council and submitters interact with each other

 

§  The addition of limits upon Acceptance of Community or Informal Question/Statement Forms

 

§  All references to General Manager updated to Chief Executive Officer

 

§  Minor administrative changes to correct outdated references contained within the document

 

§  Considerable change to the layout to relocate and reword text in line with Council's 'Plain English' strategic direction.

Consultation

§ The Draft Community Forum Guidelines were publicly exhibited from 21 May to 18 June 2020. Submissions closed on 2 July 2020. No submissions were received.

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       Draft Community Forum Guidelines  

2.       Draft Community Forum Guidelines with Track Changes    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

15.4       Farmland Rating Policy

File Number:           10619-2#299

 

Executive Summary

·        At Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 21 April, 2020 Council resolved to place the Farmland Rating Policy on public exhibition.

·        The Farmland Rating Policy was placed on exhibition for a period of 21 days. No submissions were received.

·        The purpose of this report is to detail the outcomes of the Public Exhibition of the Farmland Rating Policy and seek adoption of the policy.

 

Recommendation

That Council adopts the draft Farmland Rating Policy.

 

Report

The Farmland Rating Policy was first adopted on 21 December, 2015 and sets formal criteria for assessing Farmland rating applications made under section 515 of the Local Government Act, 1993. Council officers rely on the Farmland Rating Policy to determine applications using a consistent application process and assessment criteria.

 

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 21 April, 2020 Council resolved to place the Farmland Rating Policy on public exhibition.

Consultation

The Policy was placed on exhibition for 21 days. There were no submissions received from the public during the exhibition period.

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       DRAFT - Farmland Rating Policy - Track Changes  

2.       DRAFT - Farmland Rating Policy    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

15.5       2020 Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination

File Number:           12275#16

 

Executive Summary

The Local Government Remuneration Tribunal [the Tribunal] released its determination report on 22 June 2020, including the maximum fees payable to the Mayor and Councillors.  Wollondilly Shire Council has been moved to the newly created category of Regional Centre. 

Council is required to formally set the fees for Mayors and Councillors each year following the Tribunal determination. At the 16 June 2020 meeting when considering the 2020/21 Operation Plan and Budget, Council Resolved “that …..  Councillors fees be frozen for the next 12 months.” (Resolution 105/2020).

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Note the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal determination to change Wollondilly Shire Council’s category from Regional Rural to Regional Centre.

2.       Determine the fees payable to Councillors is $20,280 and the Mayor is $44,250 [plus the Councillor Fee], which is consistent with the 16 June 2020 resolution.

Report

The Tribunal’s determination report focusses on the categories of councils and mayoral offices and places each council and mayoral office into one of those categories.

The Tribunal last undertook a significant review of the categories and the allocation of councils into each of those categories in 2017. The Tribunal undertook a review of the categories and allocation of councils into each of those categories as part of the 2020 review. In reviewing the categories, the Tribunal examined a range of statistical and demographic data and considered the submissions of councils and Local Government NSW (LGNSW). For the Non-Metropolitan group, the Tribunal has determined to: create two new categories - Major Strategic Area and Regional Centre.

Council has been moved from Regional Rural to the new Regional Centre category.

The Tribunal also determines, for each of the categories, the maximum and minimum amount of fees to be paid to mayors and councillors.

The Tribunal has determined that there will be no increase in the minimum and maximum fees applicable to each existing category. For the new categories, the Tribunal has determined fees having regard to relevant relativities.

The fee structure for the new Regional Centre category is:

Councillor Annual Fee – minimum $13,820 – maximum $24,320

Mayoral Annual Fee – minimum $28,750 – maximum $60,080 [plus the Councillor fee]

The current fees payable to Councillors is $20,280 and the Mayor is $44,250 [plus the Councillor Fee].

At the 16 June 2020 meeting when considering the 2020/21 Operation Plan and Budget, Council Resolved “that …..  Councillors fees be frozen for the next 12 months.” (Resolution 105/2020). As such, the recommendation above suggests setting the fees payable to Councillors at $20,280 and the Mayor at $44,250 [plus the Councillor Fee] to keep the fees at the same rate as 2019/20.

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

15.6       Investment of Funds as at 31 May 2020

File Number:           12275#22

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide details of Council’s invested funds as at 31 May 2020.

 

Recommendation

That the information and certification in relation to the investment of Council funds as at 31 May 2020 be noted.

 

 

Report

At its last meeting, the Reserve Bank decided to maintain the current policy settings, including the targets for the cash rate and the yield on 3-year Australian government bonds of 25 basis points. In relation to the domestic market, the Board of the Reserve Bank commented that:

 

“The global economy is experiencing a severe downturn as countries seek to contain the coronavirus. Many people have lost their jobs and there has been a sharp rise in unemployment. Over the past month, infection rates have declined in many countries and there has been some easing of restrictions on activity. If this continues, a recovery in the global economy will get under way, supported by both the large fiscal packages and the significant easing in monetary policies.

Globally, conditions in financial markets have continued to improve, although conditions in some markets remain fragile. Volatility has declined and credit markets have progressively opened to more firms. Bond rates remain at historically low levels.

In Australia, the government bond markets are operating effectively and the yield on 3-year Australian Government Securities (AGS) is at the target of around 25 basis points. Given these developments, the Bank has purchased government bonds on only one occasion since the previous Board meeting, with total purchases to date of around $50 billion. The Bank is prepared to scale-up its bond purchases again and will do whatever is necessary to ensure bond markets remain functional and to achieve the yield target for 3-year AGS. The target will remain in place until progress is being made towards the goals for full employment and inflation.

The Bank's market operations are continuing to support a high level of liquidity in the Australian financial system. Authorised deposit-taking institutions are making use of the Term Funding Facility, with total drawings to date of around $6 billion. Further use of this facility is expected over coming months.

The Australian economy is going through a very difficult period and is experiencing the biggest economic contraction since the 1930s. In April, total hours worked declined by an unprecedented 9 per cent and more than 600,000 people lost their jobs, with many more people working zero hours. Household spending weakened very considerably and investment plans are being deferred or cancelled.

Notwithstanding these developments, it is possible that the depth of the downturn will be less than earlier expected. The rate of new infections has declined significantly and some restrictions have been eased earlier than was previously thought likely. And there are signs that hours worked stabilised in early May, after the earlier very sharp decline. There has also been a pick-up in some forms of consumer spending.

 

 

However, the outlook, including the nature and speed of the expected recovery, remains highly uncertain and the pandemic is likely to have long-lasting effects on the economy. In the period immediately ahead, much will depend on the confidence that people and businesses have about the health situation and their own finances.

The substantial, coordinated and unprecedented easing of fiscal and monetary policy in Australia is helping the economy through this difficult period. It is likely that this fiscal and monetary support will be required for some time.

The Board is committed to do what it can to support jobs, incomes and businesses and to make sure that Australia is well placed for the recovery. Its actions are keeping funding costs low and supporting the supply of credit to households and businesses. This accommodative approach will be maintained as long as it is required. The Board will not increase the cash rate target until progress is being made towards full employment and it is confident that inflation will be sustainably within the 2–3 per cent target band.”

 

The majority of Council’s investment portfolio (90%) is invested in deposits / securities with Australian Authorised Deposit taking Institutions (ADI’s).  Council has been taking advantage of term deposit “specials” from various institutions without overexposing the portfolio to any one institution. Note that the marked to market valuations on some of the direct investment products in Council’s portfolio remain at less than the face value of the investment.  The marked to market value of these investments is expected to be equal to or greater than the face value by the time they reach their maturity date.  Early exit from these products would realise losses.

 

The following chart compares Council’s portfolio yield with the benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index rate in each month for 2018/19 and 2019/20.

 

 

As shown in the chart above, Council’s portfolio yield has continually exceeded the benchmark AusBond 3 month Bank Bill Index due to the prudent investment of Council’s portfolio.

 

Under Reg 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, Council’s Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council each month with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Act.

 

 

 

 

 

Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 May 2020 is summarised below.

Details of Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 May 2020 are provided in attachment 1.

 

Consultation

Independent advice regarding the investment of Council funds was provided by Prudential Investment Services Corp and a portfolio review has been undertaken to ensure that the portfolio remains appropriate in the current environment.

 

The advice of Prudential Investment Services is that “Council has a well diversified portfolio of term deposits and bank issued bonds from the highest quality institutions in Australia.  No change in Council’s investment strategy is recommended in response to the current market conditions.”

Financial Implications

Council continues to invest those funds which, having regard to Council’s Resourcing Strategy 2017/18 – 2020/21 and adopted Operational Plan 2019/20, are not required to manage Council’s day-to-day cash flow or have been identified as required to fund specific future projects and expenditure or anticipated (budgeted) future commitments.

Interest earned is allocated to restricted cash and income in accordance with Council’s adopted budget, policy and legislative requirements. Accrued interest to 31 May 2020 was $487,998.88.

The chart below compares actual interest received to date with budgeted interest for the year.

Interest for the month of May represented an increase of 1.92% pa vs the bank bill benchmark of 0.10% pa for the month.

 

The Floating Rate Note capital value component of Council’s portfolio value continued to improve during May.

 

The Reserve Bank of Australia has continued to keep interest rates low.

Certification

I hereby certify that Council’s investments have been made in accordance with Sec 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General Regulations) 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Clair Hardy

Chief Financial Officer

WOLLONDILLY SHIRE COUNCIL

 

Attachments

1.       Investment Summary Report May 2020     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

16        Notice of Motion/Rescissions

16.1       Notice of Motion - Update on the Outer Sydney Orbital

File Number:           12275#19

 

I Councillor Judith Hannan intend to move the following motion:

 

Motion

That a report providing an update on the Outer Sydney Orbital (M9) come to Council.

 

 

CEO’s Comment

 

In March 2018, the NSW Government publicly exhibited a planning study to identify and ultimately preserve a preferred alignment for the M9 Outer Sydney Orbital. This multi-modal transport corridor in Western Sydney, will comprise a motorway, a north–south freight rail line, and, where practical, integrating a north–south passenger rail line. Council raised a number of concerns in a submission to Transport for New South Wales on 1 June 2018.

 

A briefing note or a brief report on the current status of the M9 Outer Sydney Orbital can be prepared within existing operational resources.

 

Alternatively, the facilitator of this project, Transport for NSW, can be invited to a future Councillor Briefing session; noting that only public information may be made available due to confidentiality agreements in place.

 

 

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

16.2       Notice of Motion - Koala Management Plan

File Number:           12275#12

 

I Councillor Judith Hannan intend to move the following motion:

 

Motion

That a report come to Council on the Koala Management Plan progression.

 

 

CEO’s Comment

 

A briefing note or brief report can be prepared within existing operational resources to address this matter.

 

 

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

16.3       Notice of Motion - Classification of Agricultural Land Community Forum Presentation

File Number:           12275#13

 

I Councillor Judith Hannan intend to move the following motion:

 

Motion

That the presenter of information about the classification of agricultural land to the Rural Liaison Committee be asked to present to a Community Forum.

 

 

CEO’s Comment

 

The Department of Primary Industry is currently undertaking a Rural Agricultural Lands mapping study.

 

The project aims to identify and map State Significant Agricultural Land (SSAL) and to develop an Agricultural Land Policy with the following objectives:

•        Implement the Right to Farm policy;

•        Recognise important agricultural land; and

•        Raise the profile of agricultural planning.

 

The project will:

•        Identify the State’s most important agricultural land;

•        Provide regional agricultural profiles identifying planning barriers and opportunities; and

•        Amend the planning framework to recognise important agricultural land.

 

Public exhibition is planned for the second half of 2020.

 

This resolution if adopted can be delivered within existing operational budgets.

 

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

16.4       Notice of Motion - Parking Fee at Burragorang Lookout

File Number:           12275#14

 

I Councillor Judith Hannan intend to move the following motion:

 

Motion

That Council write and ask for the fee to park at Burragorang Lookout be removed and if it isn’t then a petition be started to present to our state member.

 

CEO’s Comment

 

This motion, if adopted, can be implemented within existing operational resources.

 

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

16.5       Notice of Motion - Fast Tracking of Wilton New Town

File Number:           12275#25

 

I Councillor Judith Hannan intend to move the following motion:

 

Motion

That we have a report with resolutions of Council relating to Wilton and fast tracking.

 

CEO’s Comment

 

A briefing note or a brief report on this issue can be prepared within existing operational resources.

 

 

Attachments

Nil    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

17        Closed Reports  

Recommendation

1.          That Council considers the confidential report(s) listed below in a meeting closed to the public in accordance with Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993:

17.1       Quarterly Legal Status

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with advice concerning litigation, or advice as comprises a discussion of this matter, that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege

This report covers outcomes of litigation matters and associated legal expenditure.

2.          That pursuant to Section 10A(1) of the Local Government Act 1993, the media and public be excluded from the meeting on the basis that the business to be considered is classified confidential under the provisions of Section 10A(2).

 

3.          That the correspondence and reports relevant to the subject business be withheld from access to the media and public as required by Section 11(2) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

21 July 2020

 

18        Questions for Next Meeting

No reports this meeting