Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

 

You are invited to attend the next Ordinary Meeting of Council:

 

Date:

Tuesday, 20 October 2020

Time:

6.30pm

Location:

To be held remotely online via Audio Visual Link and Open to the Public via Webcast

 

AGENDA

 

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

20 October 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Ben Taylor

Chief Executive Officer

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

Order Of Business

1         Opening. 5

2         Recording of the Meeting. 5

3         Webcast Notice. 5

4         National Anthem.. 5

5         Acknowledgement of Country. 5

6         Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests. 5

7         Declaration of Interest 5

8         Confirmation of Minutes. 5

9         Items to be Tabled. 5

10       Mayoral Minute. 6

10.1         Mayoral Minute. 6

11       Sustainable and Balanced Growth. 7

11.1         Participation Agreement and the Planning Acceleration Program.. 7

11.2         Amendments to Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 (WDCP) Volume 3 Subdivision of Land Part 3 Controls for Specific Locations -  3.4 Tahmoor West 13

11.3         Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee - September 2020 Meeting Minutes. 21

11.4         Planning and Advocacy for Essential Infrastructure for the Wilton Growth Area. 24

12       Management and Provision of Infrastructure. 26

12.1         Traffic Management Upgrades - Mount Hunter Public School 26

12.2         Concept Design for Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct Performing Arts Centre. 28

13       Caring for the Environment 35

13.1         Proposed Motion from Bland Shire Council to the Local Government Conference Regarding Mining Rates. 35

14       Looking after the Community. 37

14.1         Proposed Commencement of a Council Preschool Service. 37

15       Efficient and Effective Council 43

15.1         Exhibition of the Wollondilly Shire Council Code of Conduct and associated Procedures and Gifts and Benefits Policy. 43

15.2         Cemeteries Policy Exhibition. 45

15.3         Smoke-Free Areas Policy Exhibition. 46

15.4         Investment of Funds as at 31 August 2020. 48

15.5         Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisation’s (ISJO) Associate Membership Proposal 52

16       Notice of Motion/Rescissions. 54

16.1         Notice of Motion - Condell Park Homestead Wilton. 54

 

 

17       Closed Reports. 55

17.1         Proposed Acquisition of Land - Lot 27 DP 32597, 32 Margaret Street, Picton. 55

17.2         Proposed acquisition of Land Lot 9 DP 233747, 436 Argyle Street, Picton. 55

17.3         Claim for Domestic Waste Service Charge Refund. 55

17.4         Quarterly Legal Status. 55

18       Questions for Next Meeting. 56

No reports this meeting

 


1          Opening

Legislative changes to the Local Government Act section 747A now permits Council meetings to be held remotely using audio visual link and is open to members of the community via webcast.

2          Recording of the Meeting

In accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice the electronic recording of the Council Meeting and the use of electronic media during the proceedings is not permitted. This includes devices such as laptops, mobile phones, tape recorders and video cameras.

3          Webcast Notice

Members of the public are advised, in accordance with Section 18 of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (PPIPA), that Wollondilly Shire Council records and webcasts live all Ordinary and Extraordinary Meetings of Council held in open session for the purpose of facilitating community access. The webcasts are publicly available for viewing on Council’s website.

Video footage collected is of the decision making body only. The webcasts and webcast recordings are protected by copyright and owned by Council. No part of the proceedings of a meeting of the Council may be recorded, copied or made available to others by members of the public without the authority of the Council.

Council may be required to disclose recordings pursuant to the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

4          National Anthem

5          Acknowledgement of Country

The Mayor will acknowledge the traditional Custodians of the Land.

6          Apologies and Leave of Absence Requests

7          Declaration of Interest

8          Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting - 15 September 2020

9          Items to be Tabled

Disclosure of Interests Register – 2019/20

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

10        Mayoral Minute

10.1       Mayoral Minute

File Number:           12275#94

 

Recommendation

That the Mayoral Minute be accepted.

 

 

 

The Mayor may put to a meeting (without notice) any matter the Council is allowed to deal with or which the Council officially knows about.

 

Attachments

Nil  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

11        Sustainable and Balanced Growth

11.1       Participation agreement and the planning acceleration program

File Number:           12275#78

 

Executive Summary

Wollondilly has one of the fastest Development Assessment turnaround times in NSW and is continually working to accelerate planning decision-making to support the creation of local jobs and economic stimulus in the Wollondilly Shire.

Council has an opportunity under the NSW State Government’s Public Spaces Legacy Program to secure a $4m grant for the delivery of public infrastructure for the Wollondilly community.  The program requires Council to commit to further accelerating planning decision making to support economic activity and job creation, particularly important now due to the significant economic impacts of Covid-19.

This report seeks Council’s formal endorsement for participation in the Public Spaces Legacy Program, and for changes required to notification provisions for minor, low risk, substantially compliant development applications to achieve the program outcomes. In response to correspondence from the Department of Planning, Environment and Industry, this report also proposes referring a number of planning proposals more than 4 years old that have unresolved issues requiring NSW Government intervention to the Department for determination. These planning proposals cannot be finalised by Council as issues such as access to Sydney Water infrastructure can only be resolved by the NSW Government.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Confirms Council’s commitment to further accelerating planning decision making to support the creation of local jobs and economic stimulus in the Wollondilly Shire.

2.       Endorses Council’s participation in the NSW government’s Public Spaces Legacy Program  to secure a $4m grant for the delivery of public infrastructure for the Wollondilly community and commits to accelerate planning decisions to deliver the Program’s required performance improvements and targets.

3.       Authorises the CEO to sign the Participation Agreement on Council’s behalf.

4.       Exhibits the proposed changes to the notification provisions in the Community Participation Plan for minor development as detailed in this report, noting that these changes are needed to enable Council to meet the $4m Public Spaces Legacy Program grant requirements but will not compromise Council’s rigour in ensuring appropriate assessment of all DAs.

5.       Notes that a future report will be prepared for Council on the results of the exhibition process

6.       Refers nominated planning proposals to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for determination where they meet the following criteria:

(a)     Gateway determination more than 4 years old; and

(b)     Unresolved State issues preventing determination by Council.

 

 

 

 

Report

Council has an opportunity under the NSW State Government’s Public Spaces Legacy Program to secure a $4m grant for the delivery of public infrastructure for the Wollondilly community.  The program requires Council to commit to further accelerating planning decision making to support economic activity and job creation, particularly important now due to the significant economic impacts of Covid-19.

To support Council’s commitment to the Public Spaces Legacy Program to fast track development applications, Council is required to accelerate planning decisions to deliver performance improvements and meet targets as identified below:

1.     Finalise regionally significant DAs that have been under assessment for 180+ days by December 2020;

2.     Demonstrate 6-10 years of housing or employment supply capacity by 30 June 2021;

3.     Provide a project outline plan for finalising planning proposals more than 4 years old by June 2021; and

4.     Reduce DA turnaround times by 5%.

Council has only one regionally significant DA and this will be reported to the Sydney West Regional Planning Panel for determination in November.  Council has also satisfied the second requirement in respect of housing supply and has submitted the Local Housing Strategy to the Department for endorsement.

 

This report will focus on the remaining two requirements – outstanding planning proposals and a reduction in DA turnaround times.  Council has received further advice from the Department in respect of planning proposals more than 4 years old and this is discussed below. 

 

To support the achievement of the 5% reduction in DA turnaround times, this report proposes amendments to the notification provisions in the Community Participation Plan.

 

Planning Proposals

 

Council has received correspondence from the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment advising that Councils across the State should determine planning proposals with Gateway Determinations more than 4 years old by 31 December 2020. 

 

Where Councils are unable to determine proposals because of unresolved State issues relating to Sydney Water (sewerage), mining or bushfire considerations, the planning proposals should be referred back to the State for review and determination as appropriate.

 

Council has a number of planning proposals with Gateway Determinations more than 4 years old with unresolved State issues preventing determination by Council.  In accordance with the advice from the Department, these proposals should be referred to the State for determination.  Should the Department determine that the proposals should not proceed at this time, the proposals could be resubmitted at a future time if the unresolved issues have been addressed.

 

Reducing DA turnaround times

 

Wollondilly has one of the fastest Development Assessment turnaround times in NSW and is required to achieve a 5% reduction in DA turnaround times to meet the Program requirements. 

To support the achievement of this target, Council officers have proposed a number of changes to DA notification provisions as detailed below.   These changes only relate to minor, low-risk, complying development applications.  Complex applications and those that are sensitive or involve potential significant impacts will continue to be publicly exhibited. 

In addition, more staff resources will be allocated to support accelerated DA decision-making including the recruitment of positions that were held vacant temporarily due to the economic impact of Covid-19 on Council’s finances.

Notwithstanding the proposed changes to the formal notification provisions for minor applications, Council’s DA Tracker service provides 24/7 public access to all applications on-line, including plans and supporting technical reports and elevations.  During 2019/20 Council’s DA Tracker had 15,864 unique views, which equates to around 58 view per day.

Council’s DA Tracker was recently recognised by the Planning Alerts and Open Australia Foundation who provided the following positive feedback:

I’m writing to offer warmest congratulations on releasing your DA tracker! I’m writing in the hope of connecting with the development team for Wollondilly DA tracker.

https://www.wollondilly.nsw.gov.au/home/mediareleases/council-launches-new-online-da-tracker/

“This system is user friendly and easy to navigate. Even better, it was developed in-house by Council, so it is at no extra cost to ratepayers.”

As the makers of PlanningAlerts, we see a lot of implementations of how to share information about what’s happening in the local area. We recognise the effort and Wollondilly Shire Council for doing this and doing it well.

 

DA Tracker uses can sign up to the free Planning Alerts service to receive email alerts regarding any development applications lodged within a selected geographic area around a nominated property address. 

 

Council officers will also be progressing a similar alert service as part of ongoing development of the DA Tracker by mid-2021.

 

Community Participation Plan proposed changes

 

Background

On 18 November 2019 Council adopted the Wollondilly Community Participation Plan to be effective from 1 December 2019.

 

The Community Participation Plan (CPP) was developed to provide the community with a clear process of how and when Council will engage with the community in relation to proposed development and plan making across the Shire, including mandatory requirements for public exhibition in relation to its planning functions.

 

The overarching aim of community participation is to gather feedback from the community on key strategic planning documents, planning proposals, and development applications to inform Council’s relevant planning panels’ decision making process.

 

The CPP meets the legislative requirements of community participation under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act) and aims to enable genuine and effective opportunities for the community to participate in Council’s strategic plan making and the development application process.

 

Changes are proposed to the CPP that relate to minor, low-risk, complying development applications.  Complex applications and those that are sensitive or involve potential significant impacts will continue to be publicly exhibited. 

 

The following changes are proposed to the Community Participation Plan:

 

 

 

A.  Residential and small scale development in new subdivisions

In new subdivisions, no information letters or formal notification will be required for residential and small scale development within 5 years of the registration of the deposited plan. This applies to any new subdivision where a deposited plan was registered in 2018 and onwards.

 

B.  All development applications are amended during the assessment process and S4.55 modification applications. 

Where there is an increased environmental impact and determined necessary by Council the application will be notified for 7 days, unless otherwise required by the EP & A Act.

 

C.  Proposed changes

No notification will be required for minor developments listed in the following table as long as the criteria in the right hand column are met, otherwise the development will require a formal notification period of 7 days. 

 

 

Existing CPP criteria

(added criteria underlined and deleted criteria strikethrough)

 

Type of Development

Criteria which excludes the development from requiring notification

Dwelling house (including alterations and additions)

·      No other Dwelling House located on the same allotment

·      Finished floor levels no greater than 1m above or below the natural ground level

·      Complies with Council’s building line setbacks prescribed in this plan

·      For single storey dwellings - No walls less than one (1) metre 900mm from any boundary

·      For two storey dwellings – be set back at least 10.0m from side boundaries.

·      Total floor area of less than 430m2

·      No more than 2 garage doors visible from the street

·      Not located on a lot containing a Heritage Item or within a Heritage Conservation Area, including a Landscape Conservation Area.

Carports (residential)

·      Relates to a residential use of the land;

·      Complies with Council’s building line setbacks in this plan

·      Setback from side boundaries is no less than 1.0m 900mm

·      No taller than 4m above ground level (existing)

·      Not located on a lot containing a Heritage Item or within a Heritage Conservation Area, including a Landscape Conservation Area.

Awnings and Pergolas (residential)

·      Relates to a residential use of the land

·      Complies with Council’s building line setbacks in this plan

·      Setbacks from side boundaries are no less than 1m 900mm

·      No taller than 4m above existing ground level

·      Not located on a lot containing a Heritage Item or within a Heritage Conservation Area, including a Landscape Conservation Area

Gazebos (residential)

·      Relates to a residential use of the land

·      Complies with Council’s building line setbacks in this plan

·      Setback from side boundaries no less than 1m 900mm

·      No taller than 4m above existing ground level

·      Not located on a lot containing a Heritage Item or within a Heritage Conservation Area, including a Landscape Conservation Area

Retaining walls (residential)

·      Relates to a residential use of the land

·      No more than 0.6m 1m high

·      Setback from side and rear boundaries is no less than 2.5m 500mm

·      Located behind or beside the dwelling.

Swimming pools (residential)

·      Relates to a residential use of the land

·      Setback from side and rear boundaries no less than 1m

·      Located in the rear yard or on a corner lot, behind the front and secondary street setbacks of the dwelling

·      No coping or decking more than 0.5m above ground level (existing)

Decks and Balconies (residential)

·      Relates to a residential use of the land

·      No more than 0.5m above ground level (existing)

·      Setback at least 10.0m from any boundary

Residential Outbuildings

·      Relates to a residential use of the land

·      Complies with the building line setbacks in this plan

·      Located in a residential zone (other than R5 Large Lot Residential)

·      Setback from any boundary is no less than 900mm

·      No higher than 3.5 metres above the natural ground level

·      Can accommodate a maximum of two car parking spaces

·      Floor area less than 50m2

Ancillary Buildings including Farm Buildings

·      Relates to a residential use of the land

·      Located on land zoned R5, RU1, RU2, RU4 or E4

·      Complies with the building line setbacks contained within this plan

·      Setback from any boundary is no less than 10.0m

·      No higher than 5.0m above natural ground level

·      Floor area less than 100m2

Telecommunications Facilities

·      Be “low impact facilities” as defined by the legislation of the Commonwealth.

Tree removal (residential)

·      Removal of 10 trees or less

·      Located on residential zoned land

Tree removal (rural)

·      Removal of less than 10m2 of vegetation

·      Located on rural zoned land

Tree removal (agricultural)

·      Located in a RU1 or RU2

·      Removal is required for the purposes of agriculture

Demolition

·      Demolition of a building that would have been subject to another exemption in this clause if it were being proposed as a new building.

·      Located on a lot containing a heritage item or within a Heritage Conservation Area, including a Landscape Conservation Area

Septic Tanks

·      No notification required

Rain Water Tanks

·      No notification required

Strata subdivision of existing buildings

·      Existing building is lawful and complies with the Building Code of Australia.

·      No notification required

Subdivision of existing approved dual occupancy

·      Be located in Zones R2, R3 or B4

·      The existing building(s) is/are lawful

·      No notification required

Health Services Facility

·      Located within Zones B1, B2 or B5

·      Be located wholly within an existing commercial building

Kiosk

·      Be located within Zones B1, B2 or RE2

Change of use of an existing building from one type of commercial use to another

·      Where in the responsible Council Officer’s opinion the proposed new use is unlikely to result in land use conflict due to noise, hours of operation or traffic generation

·      Proposed use is permissible in the zone

·      Adequate car parking is provided

·      In a business zone

·      Contained within an existing building

Internal Works to an existing building

·      Does not affect the height, footprint or external appearance of the building.

·      No notification required

Minor Commercial external building alterations/additions

·      Works are not proposed to a Heritage Item or to a building within a Heritage Conservation Area, including a Landscape Conservation Area.

·      Does not increase the height of the building.

·      Does not create additional shops/units.

Change of use from one type of light industry to another type of light industry

·      Proposed use is permissible in the zone

·      Adequate car parking is provided

·      Where in the responsible Council Officer’s opinion the proposed new use is unlikely to result in land use conflict due to noise, hours of operation or traffic generation

·      The land is within an industrial zone

·      Contained within an existing building

·      The land does not adjoin any residential, rural, environmental or open space zone

Secondary Dwellings

·      The lot is within a rural or environmental zone and is greater than 2 hectares

·      Will not result in any more dwellings than the principal dwelling and the secondary dwelling on the site.

·      Is consistent with the setback requirements for Secondary Dwellings in rural and environmental zones contained in Volume 4 of Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016.

Minor Environmental Protection Works

·      No notification required.

Signage

·      Within a business or industrial zone

·      Does not require advertising under SEPP 64

·      Is not illuminated or digital

·      Is not attached to a heritage item, on a lot containing a heritage item or within a heritage conservation area, including a Landscape Conservation Area

·      Is not in association with a restricted premises

Works that are required in response to an emergency situation (such as a natural disaster event, e.g. a flood).

·      No notification required

Home Occupations

·      Where, in the responsible Council Officer’s opinion the proposed new use is unlikely to result in land use conflict due to noise, hours of operation or traffic generation.

Consultation

Consultation has been undertaken with Councillors and Council officers on the proposed changes to support Council’s commitment to the Public Space Legacy Program to fast track development applications to support economic activity and create job opportunities in Wollondilly Shire.  The proposed changes to the CPP will be publicly exhibited and a further report prepared for Council.

Financial Implications

Council has the opportunity to secure $4m for public infrastructure for the Wollondilly community through the Public Spaces Legacy Program.  The costs of the proposed changes to the CPP and exhibition process can be absorbed through the existing Council budget.  Additionally, the proposed changes will deliver budget savings for Council in reduced administrative, stationery and postage costs.  For example, during 2019/20, there were 478 neighbour notifications in addition to 58 advertised notifications.  This resulted in approximately 6432 hard copy letters being posted at a cost of $1.30 each for postage, plus staff time to prepare, estimated in total at a cost of $6 per letter. 

A reduction of 50% would represent a saving to Council in excess of $18,000 and the reduced time spent on administrative tasks would be able to be re-directed to other activities.

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

11.2       Amendments to Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 (WDCP) Volume 3 Subdivision of Land Part 3 Controls for Specific Locations -  3.4 Tahmoor West

File Number:           10619-2#260

 

 

Proposal:  Amendment to Wollondilly Development Control Plan Volume 3, Part 3, Controls for Specific Locations - 3.4 Tahmoor West.

Address:                                All land within the Tahmoor West precinct

Lot & DP:                               Lot 39 DP 1215451

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s support to publicly exhibit proposed amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan, 2016, Volume 3 Subdivision of Land Part 3.4 – Controls for Specific Locations (Tahmoor West).

The amendments propose an updated structure plan and revised wording to ensure consistency with the current Planning Proposal known as the West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 and development that has already occurred in the West Tahmoor precinct.

The West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal was publicly exhibited from 22 May 2020 to 19 June 2020.

A further report on the outcomes of the public exhibition of the proposed amendments to the Development Control Plan will be provided to Council detailing the final controls for adoption.

Recommendation

1.       That Council supports the public exhibition of the amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 Volume 3 Part 3 Controls for Specific Locations (3.4) Tahmoor West; and

2.       That Council notifies the proponent, landowners and submitters of Council’s decision.

 

Background

The Tahmoor West precinct was originally rezoned as part of the Picton Tahmoor Thirlmere (PTT) planning proposal in 2013 and parts of the site have been developed since this time.

The West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 (West Tahmoor) Planning Proposal is part of a series of planning proposals located within this precinct.

The West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal

The West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal was submitted to Council on 26 August, 2016 and was supported in an amended form by Council on Monday 20 February 2017. The Planning Proposal was further supported by Council on Tuesday 18 April 2017 when a report was considered to include an additional small triangle of land of approximately 300m2. A copy of the reports and minutes of Council are provided in Attachment 1.

A Gateway Determination to proceed with the Draft Planning Proposal was issued by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment (now known as Department of Planning, Industry and Environment) on 7 July 2017. Several Gateway extensions have since been issued with the most recent including an amendment to public agency consultation requirements. The current timeframe for completion of the Planning Proposal is 31 December 2020.

 

 

The Planning Proposal details changes to the Wollondilly Local Environment Plan 2011 (WLEP 2011) to rezone part of the site, being approximately 1.3 hectares of residential land for environmental conservation purposes and to reduce the minimum lot size of the remaining 1.2 hectares of residential land from 4000 square metres to 700 square metres to allow for smaller lot subdivision to create the potential for approximately 12 new lots. The changes also include amending the Natural Resources Water (NRW) map to remove the 50 metre buffer and to retain the 30 metre buffer only.

A copy of the most current planning proposal is provided in Attachment 2.

Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 Volume 3 Part 3 Controls for Specific Locations

Volume 3 of the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 contains site specific development controls for the West Tahmoor precinct. These are located in Part 3.4 Controls for Specific Locations (Tahmoor West). These controls apply to the West Tahmoor Planning Proposal site. 

These controls also contain a Structure Plan that identifies Asset Protection Zone (APZ) widths and locations, vegetation buffers and road layout. The APZ widths and buffers are not consistent with the proposed changes detailed in the West Tahmoor Planning Proposal and so the structure plan needs to be updated to include these revised widths and buffers. A copy of the current Development Controls and Structure Plan applying to West Tahmoor is provided in Attachment 3.

Development Application

A development application for the subdivision of the site has been submitted to Council to be considered concurrently with the Planning Proposal under 3.39 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. The proposed changes to the Structure Plan within Part 3.4 of Volume 3 of the DCP are consistent with the proposed plan of subdivision that has been submitted with this Development Application. A copy of this Proposed Plan of Subdivision is provided in Attachment 4.

Site Context

The Tahmoor West Precinct is located on the western periphery of the Tahmoor residential area and is bound by Thirlmere Way to the South, Myrtle Creek to the North and Major Roberts Road and Crown Land to the West. The location of the Tahmoor West Precinct is shown in Figure 1 below in green outline.

The West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal site is located within the Tahmoor West Precinct and relates to Lot 39 DP 1215451 which is located on the Northern boundary of the precinct as shown in Figure 1 with blue shading.

The Tahmoor West Site specific controls were introduced following the rezoning of the overall West Tahmoor Precinct as part of the Picton Tahmoor Thirlmere (PTT) planning proposal in 2013.

Although a large proportion of the Tahmoor West precinct has now been developed and the road the layout for this section finalised sites on the eastern, western and northern boundary are in various stages of planning. This can be seen in the aerial imagery in Figure 1. To ensure the original intent of the Tahmoor West site specific controls are not lost, only minimal changes to the controls and layout plan are proposed. These changes are summarised below.

                    

FIGURE 1: Location of Tahmoor West Precinct and West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Planning Proposal Site Location

 

Proposed Amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016

The proposed amendments relate to the site specific controls for the Tahmoor West precinct. These are contained in Volume 3 Subdivision of Land of the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016. The specific controls to be amended are within Part 3.4 Tahmoor West.

 

The proposed amendments are in response to the following matters identified during the West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 planning proposal process:

§ The proposed removal of the 50m buffer of the LEP Natural Resources Water Map;

§ The introduction of an E2 Environmental Protection Zone;

§ Planning for Bushfire requirements including APZ widths and fire trail requirements.

 

 

The summary and explanation for each of the controls to be varied are provided in Table 1 below:

 

Table 1 – Summary and explanation of proposed changes

Section to be Changed

Current Control(s)

Proposed change

Proposed Control(s)

Justification for Change

Structure Plan

Structure Plan Notation

Riparian Corridor (Cat 1 – 40m + 10M Vegetation Buffer) To be incorporated within private property, corridor to be owned by one or two private allotments, vegetation to be rehabilitated, subject to an approved vegetation management plan registered in private titles.

Change wording to delete “or two” to one private allotment only.

Change to 30m buffer in line with the proposed removal of the 50m buffer on the NRW map and retention of the 30m buffer.

30m wide Riparian Corridor/Vegetation Buffer to be incorporated within private property. Corridor to be owned by one private allotment, vegetation to be rehabilitated, subject to an approved vegetation management plan registered in private title.

This is in line with the APZ and fire trail to be within one allotment and will provide for better management of the E2 zoned land. This change is also in line with the proposed plan of subdivision that has been submitted with the concurrent development application.

Structure Plan Notation

APZ (15-25m) to be incorporated within private property.

Change to APZ width of 15m along western boundary of the West Tahmoor No. 2 Planning Proposal boundary and 30m from vegetation in the northern part of the lots.

15m Wide APZ along western boundary of West Tahmoor Planning Proposal No. 2 Planning Proposal site to be incorporated within private property and within one private allotment.

Change to APZ width to match bushfire report requirements.

Structure Plan Notation additional text

N/A

Include additional notation

6m wide fire trail to be incorporated within private property to be located outside of E2 zoned land.

Notation to include new requirement for fire trail 6m in width and requirements for fire trail to be located outside of E2 zoned land to allow fire-fighting appliances to gain access along the hazard interface between future dwellings and the hazard.

Structure Plan Notation additional text

N/A

Include additional notation

Change to APZ width of 15m along western boundary of the West Tahmoor No. 2 Planning Proposal boundary and 30m from vegetation in the northern part of the lots.

15m width is consistent with the bushfire assessment report submitted in respect of the West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal.

Structure Plan Notation additional text

N/A

Include additional notation

Notations to show measurements and locations for 6m wide fire trail, 15m APZ to the western boundary, 30m wide vegetation buffer and 30m wide APZ to the vegetation to the north.

Included to make the location of APZ and fire trails width and locations clearer.

Change to Structure Plan Map underlay

Original map was produced by Cardno.

Create new map showing current aerial of existing development with overlay notations

New plan showing existing aerial imagery

The original plan is subject to copyright and is outdated due to new development and changes to road layout.

Objectives

Include new Objective 6

N/A

Include additional objective to reference bushfire protection

To ensure adequate bushfire protection measures are achieved.

New controls and notations relate to an increased emphasis on bushfire protection and so should be acknowledged.

Controls

Amend Control

Control 1. All land within 50 metres of the top of bank of Myrtle Creek shall be protected by the

establishment of a covenant on the land which provides the following:

Change reference from 50m to 30m

Control 1. All land within 30 metres of the top of bank of Myrtle Creek shall be protected by the

establishment of a covenant on the land which provides the following:

Change is required to ensure consistency with proposed removal of NRW 50m buffer and retention of 30m buffer.

Amend Control

Control 1 (i) Restrict development to only vegetation management for environmental outcomes

Change wording to acknowledge role of LEP and NRAR in permissibility.

Control (i) Prohibiting of development as defined by the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act on this land unless approved by Council and the Natural Resource Regulator.

Change is based on advice from Environmental Outcomes Team

Amend Control

Control 1 (ii) prohibit the fencing of this land

Change wording to ensure E2 land is appropriately fenced.

Control 1 (ii) Require the installation of three strand steel cable fencing  on the interface of the fire trail with the E2 lands

Change is based on advice from Environmental Outcomes Team

Amend condition

Control 1 (iii) require the land to be managed in accordance with a vegetation management plan approved by Council or the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage.

Change wording to acknowledge submission of Vegetation Management Plan

Control 1 (iii) require the land to be managed in accordance with Vegetation Management Plan approved by Council dated December 2018.

Change is based on advice from Environmental Outcomes Team

Add new control

 

Add additional control

Control 1 (iv) Compliance with any General Terms of Approval issued by the Natural Resource Regulator

Change is based on advice from Environmental Outcomes Team

Add new control

N/A

Required to ensure all E2 zoned land will be managed

Control 2. The E2 zoned land will be retained in one private allotment and a restriction will be placed on the lot to this effect.

Written condition will help to clarify the intention of the notation on the layout plan.

Add new control

N/A

 

Control 3. Any land shown as being within an APZ area located north of Major Roberts Ave must provide the following:

i. In addition to monitoring detailed in the VMP, any subdivision application must include details of a program that would monitor the presence and movement of wildlife through the “Riparian Corridor"

ii. Appropriate dog proof fencing must be installed on the interface between the building envelope and the fire trail.

iii. Removal or pruning of native vegetation must not exceed the level required to comply with the requirements of Planning for Bushfire Protection Guidelines 2018.

iv. Tree species within the APZ that are listed in Schedule 2 of State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) (Koala Habitat Protection) 2019 are not permitted to be removed unless approved by a Determination applying to the site or under the State Environmental Planning Policy (Vegetation in Non-Rural Areas) 2017.

v. The distance between any tree species listed in Schedule 2 of the SEPP (Koala Habitat Protection) 2019 and the nearest external wall of n habitable structure must not be less than 3 metres unless otherwise approved by a Determination applying to the site or directive by Council.

Change is based on advice from Environmental Outcomes Team

Add new control

Control 3. The subdivision shall provider larger allotments along Thirlmere Way and the western edge of the precinct.

 

Change to include new road name

Control 5. The subdivision shall provider larger allotments along the western edge of the precinct on land bordering Thirlmere Way and Major Roberts Ave.

Inclusion of Major Roberts Road and minor revision of text will help to further clarify portion of the site that the control applies to.

Amend Control numbers suit new control sequencing

 

 

As shown in Attachment 1.

 

 

These controls are considered appropriate in response to the changes proposed and it is proposed that the community and other stakeholders are invited to provide feedback on these controls.

The draft site specific controls for Tahmoor West in the Volume 3 Subdivision of Land are provided in Attachment 5.

 

CONSULTATION

Internal Consultation

The proposed amendments to the Wollondilly DCP 2016 have been provided to internal staff for review and feedback and suggestions have been incorporated into the final draft provisions.

 

Issue Raised

Assessment Comment

Item 3 refers to land fronting Thirlmere Way, but there is none.

Control 3 is proposed to be revised to include the new Major Roberts Ave and minor revision of the text will help to further clarify portion of the site that the control applies to.

The Bus Stop is not part of the Development Application submitted concurrently for the West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal site.

The DCP amendment refers to the whole of the Tahmoor West precinct. The timing of the delivery of the bus stop will need to be negotiated with the developer at the development application stage.

Minimum Lot Size

The minimum lot size map is proposed to be amended as part of the West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal. The Site Specific controls apply to the whole of the Tahmoor West precinct.

Additional Controls required for areas identified as being within APZ

Controls have been included in the draft.

Changes to wording to Controls 1 (i), (ii), (iii) to addresses changes to state legislation and the provision of a Vegetation Management Plan.

Controls have been amended.

 

CONCLUSION

The report seeks Council’s approval to publicly exhibit proposed amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan, 2016 Volume 3 Subdivision of Land Part 3.4 – Controls for Specific Locations Tahmoor West. These amendments apply to the portion of the Tahmoor West precinct that relates to the West Tahmoor Minimum Lot Size for Subdivision Amendment No. 2 Planning Proposal site. These proposed amendments have been prepared to reflect the provisions of the planning proposal and the submitted proposed plan of subdivision submitted with the concurrent development application for the site.

 

Options for Moving Forward

The proposed amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan has been prepared in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

Council’s options are:

1.       Support the amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 in the form as described in the Description of Proposal section of this report.

 

2.       Support the amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016 in another form.

 

3.       Resolve not to support the amendments to the Wollondilly Development Control Plan 2016.

 

Option 1 is the recommendation of this report.

 

Financial Implications

Funding for this project to date has been partially offset through the adopted planning proposal fees and charges. This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

 

Attachments

1.       Attachment 1 Merged Agenda Reports and Minutes  

2.       Attachment 2 Planning Proposal (Exhibited Version)  

3.       Attachment 3 Current Tahmoor West DCP Controls  

4.       Attachment 4 Plan of Proposed Subdivision for Development Application  

5.       Attachment 5 Proposed Amendmended Draft Controls  

6.       Attachment 6 New Structure Plan    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

11.3       Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee - September 2020 Meeting Minutes

File Number:           12275#79

 

Executive Summary

The Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee is a Committee established by Council consisting of members representing rural landowners. The Committee meets quarterly. The Committee’s purpose is to:

a)      Provide feedback on Planning Proposals and Development Applications which are likely to impact (positively or negatively) on agricultural production.

b)      Facilitate communication between industry and various levels of government. 

c)       Create and support opportunities and initiatives that will enhance agricultural production.

To ensure that the work of the Committee is brought to the attention of Council and the Wollondilly community, Committee minutes and recommendations will now be reported to Council.

The purpose of this report is to present the minutes and recommendation of the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee meeting held on date 2 September 2020.

Recommendation

That Council notes the recommendations of the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee meeting of 2 September 2020.

 

Report

At their meeting of 2 September 2020, the Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee members voted unanimously that a NOM as detailed below be adopted in its entirety:

1.       We recommend to Council that they defer the adoption of the Rural Lands Strategy to provide a full and proper Consultation with the Rural Landholders in the Wollondilly Shire in the future.   We would like Council employees and Council members to advocate for the Community and not, it seems, for the State Government. These are some of the anomalies in the Strategy which we have identified to date.

 

a.       The restrictions to be imposed on 8.74% (357 unfragmented lots) of rural landowners of a total of 4085 lots of 16 hectares or more in RU1 and RU2 are discriminatory and simply unfair (Actions 1.1 and 1.2).  The landholders of these 357 lots are expected to carry the burden of providing "Rural Living" vision for the entire Shire.

 

b.       The mapping appears to be incorrect - e.g. the Poultry Farms are intensive agriculture and do not overlay with the Intensive Animals map.  It has been made very difficult to read the maps accurately and we believe (for instance) that several of the mapped poultry farms and horticulture farms are no longer in use.

 

c.       The data used to support this strategy is anomalous in the extreme.  It is based on 69 survey responses from rural land holders, 200+ letterbox drops, 16 visual and face to face meetings and 45 phone calls to business and industry (were these rural businesses and industries).  On the face of it, 152 people out of 6,185 rural land holders were consulted and the Strategy is based on those responses.  This is not a fair representation from the Shire.

 

d.       There is no consideration mentioned in the Strategy of the individuals who are expected to deliver and provide this "Thames Valley" vision, in which, by the way, all landholders are fully and generously subsidised to provide the rural and farming landscape.

 

2.       At every Council Meeting there is an item titled something along the lines of Community Welfare - it is usually left blank.  On that note, we would also like to recommend to Council that they defer the adoption of the Scenic and Cultural Landscapes Study.  A similar full and proper Consultation with the residents of Wollondilly Shire should be undertaken before the study is adopted.

 

3.       One of the Committee members feels that their privacy has been violated by some unknown individual stopping at their boundary and mapping their property and the views as an ideal place to attract tourists to and a possible site for a viewing platform.  We very much doubt that any property owner would welcome the idea of strangers peering over their front fence and photographing them in the privacy of their own homes and surrounds.

 

4.       Again, there is no consideration of the impact of this plan on the residents of Wollondilly.

 

5.       Alternatively, we request a three (3) month extension for full proper dissemination of the plans and their implications to the owners of rural zoned land in the Wollondilly Shire.

 

a.       Please supply the Committee with digital copies of the maps produced in the Rural Land Strategy so that they can be properly ground proofed by Committee members who are familiar with the various rural industries represented.

 

b.       Please provide us with the data giving the area of rural zoned lots in Wollondilly Shire and the actual number of lots per area in each of the rural zones RU1, RU2, RU4 and E4.  That is, a breakdown of actual lot sizes in the Wollondilly Shire.

 

It is noted that officers have provided advice in response to the requests at Items 5 (a) and (b) above. The Committee members were also encouraged to raise their concerns in submissions on the draft Strategy.

LEP STRATEGIES EXHIBITION PROCESS

The exhibition process for the LEP strategies ran for a period of 42 days concluding on 2 October.  A report will be prepared for a future Council meeting on the outcome of the exhibition period and any recommendations arising.

The community engagement program had to be modified from the usual approach to exhibition given the limitations created by Covid 19.  However, the program has been comprehensive and has utilised a range of on-line and other tools.  A new feature for this consultation process has been the use of a dedicated page on Council’s YourSay site incorporating on-line submissions and Q&A buttons.  Under each Strategy, both a ‘Submission’ button, and an ‘Ask A Question’ button were available for registered users. Questions submitted were answered by staff within a few days.

 

 

 

 

Following is a summary of consultation undertaken:

Channels used for community consultation

-     Council’s engagement platform Your Say Wollondilly – including a landing page which references all strategies and provides a timeline, and individual strategy pages with online Q&A function.

-     Facebook posts – two generic posts initially, plus one post on each strategy at a rate of two posts per week.

-     Notification on Council’s website – under the Public Notices section

-     Notification on NSW Planning Portal

-     Email to all online submitters to the LSPS and the LEP Review Stage 1 Planning Proposal

-     Media release

-     Newspaper advertising

-     Council’s Community Newsletter (Spring Edition) distributed to all Shire households

-     Council’s eNewsletter.

 

Other consultation

-     Internal staff

-     Community Advisory Committees

-     State agencies e.g.  DPIE, Water NSW, Sydney Water, etc.

-     Adjoining councils

-     Special interest groups e.g. Wollondilly Resilience Network, Urban Development Institute of Australia, etc.

-     Presentations to the Picton Chamber of Commerce and the Business Community Taskforce

-     Previous submitters on LSPS and LEP Review Stage 1 Planning Proposal

-     Rural Lands Strategy Reference Group

-     Broader Wollondilly community (Notices in local paper & Facebook Posts)

-     Rural Lands Strategy Reference Group

-     Broader Wollondilly community (Notices in local paper & Facebook Posts).

Financial Implications

The costs associated with Council’s Advisory Committees are covered within Council’s operational budget. The costs associated with implementing the recommendations can be absorbed within the current budget.

Attachments

1.       Draft Rural Industry Community Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - 2 September 2020    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

11.4       Planning and Advocacy for Essential Infrastructure for the Wilton Growth Area

File Number:           12275#81

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to respond to a Council resolution following a Notice of Motion at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 21 July 2020. Council resolved as follows:

That Council receives a report with resolutions of Council relating to Wilton and fast tracking.

Council’s adopted Local Strategic Planning Statement Wollondilly 2040 (March 2020) identifies that priority 4 is Creating vibrant, healthy and sustainable communities in our new town in Wilton, envisaging it will be a strategic centre, with new job opportunities, regional facilities, greater advantages for health care and education, and a variety of open spaces. Wollondilly 2040 endorses Wilton as a growth area, with the land already zoned accordingly by the NSW Government, and clearly identifies that Council’s priority is to advocate strongly and work with the NSW Government to ensure investment in public transport, regional pedestrian infrastructure, district roads, district open space, health and education facilities and emergency services.

This report notes that there have been no specific Council resolutions relating to fast tracking Wilton.

Council has however been advocating strongly to the State and Federal Governments to fast-track the delivery of essential infrastructure for Wilton.

The fast-tracking of essential infrastructure for Wilton would provide economic stimulus and local jobs to help address the recent significant economic impacts of Covid-19. Over recent months Council has pushed strongly for local job creation projects and this advocacy, including for fast-tracking infrastructure for Wilton, has been the subject of recent media coverage.

The advocacy by Council and staff is paying dividends with an infrastructure plan for Sydney Water’s water and sewer supply now developed and an announcement on the timing of delivery of the new public K-12 school understood to be imminent. Discussions are continuing with Transport for NSW regarding appropriate public transport solutions.

The Department of Planning Infrastructure and Environment together with Council is preparing the Wilton staging and sequencing plan which is planned to clearly outline to the community the timing of delivery of all of the infrastructure required for Wilton as it develops.  

Funding for the infrastructure for Wilton comes from a variety of sources including local and state developer contributions, planning agreements, direct works and capital works funded through NSW Government budget processes.

Whilst Council is advocating strongly for NSW Government led infrastructure, it also now has in place its own plan for implementation of local developer-funded infrastructure for Wilton. The Wollondilly Contributions Plan adopted by Council in May 2020 details $340m of developer-funded infrastructure for Wilton including community facilities, 28 local and neighbourhood parks, 10 playing fields, a library, a leisure centre, arterial, sub-arterial and local roads.

Recommendation

That Council notes this report and continues to advocate strongly for accelerated delivery of NSW Government infrastructure to create vibrant, healthy and sustainable communities in our new town in Wilton, and to support local economic recovery and job creation.

 

 

 

 

Report

Wollondilly’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS), Wollondilly 2040, came into effect in March 2020 after endorsement by Council at the February Council meeting. The LSPS confirms Council’s formal endorsement of Wilton as a growth area.  As part of its Planning Priorities, the LSPS acknowledges the new town at Wilton will be a strategic centre, with new job opportunities, regional facilities, greater advantages for health care and education, and a variety of open spaces. 

In order to deliver its vision of creating vibrant, healthy and sustainable communities in our new town in Wilton, there is a commitment to align infrastructure provision with community needs. Council is committed to proactively planning and advocating for infrastructure to ensure it is in place as the population increases. To do this, Council has been and will continue to work with all relevant stakeholders to achieve a great new town at Wilton.

Wollondilly 2040 notes:

·            Wilton is an opportunity for the Wollondilly community to gain great new facilities and services, locally. We will continue to partner with the NSW Government and advocate for:

·       effective public transport, including electrified rail

·        a new health precinct

·       a cohesive and connected pedestrian and cycling movement network

·       strong social connection and community participation

·       efficient water use and reuse

·       effective wastewater servicing

·       an extensive tree coverage

·       the protection of native animals and implementation of a koala conservation strategy

·       preservation and protection of significant vegetation through the Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan

·       protection and promotion of waterway health

·       growth of and access to healthy food

·       embedding of innovative technology

·       local jobs for residents

·       efficient energy consumption for buildings, focused on orientation and design

Council has been advocating strongly to the State and Federal Governments to fast-track the delivery of essential infrastructure for Wilton.

The fast-tracking of essential infrastructure for Wilton would provide economic stimulus and local jobs to help address the recent significant economic impacts of Covid-19. Over recent months Council has pushed strongly for local job creation projects and this advocacy, including for fast-tracking infrastructure for Wilton, has been the subject of recent media coverage.

As part of this advocacy, the then Mayor wrote to the Minister for Transport The Hon. Andrew Constance MP regarding fast tracking infrastructure for Wilton (namely the Picton Road interchange) under the Planning Acceleration program.  Support was also provided for the Illawarra Business Chamber’s submission to Infrastructure Australia regarding the long overdue upgrade of Picton Road.

Correspondence was also sent to the Minister for Planning & Public Spaces The Hon. Rob Stokes MP regarding accelerating State transport infrastructure projects, not only to support the Wilton Growth Area, but also to address issues around community and road safety, congestion and impacts on the major freight link between the Illawarra and Greater Sydney. 

 

Copies of relevant correspondence are attached to this report as follows:

·       Letter to Minister for Planning and Public Spaces regarding Wilton Growth Area dated 17 April 2020

·       Letter to Minister for Planning and Public Spaces regarding Picton Road interchange dated 11 May 2020

·       Letter to Minister for Transport and Roads regarding urgent transport priorities for Wollondilly Shire dated 20 July 20202

·       Illawarra Business Chamber’s submission to Infrastructure Australia regarding upgrade of Picton Road dated 28 August 2020, including Wollondilly Council’s letter of support dated 27 August 2020

Wollondilly Shire has experienced first-hand the devastating impacts of the recent bushfires and was fortunate not to have the same level of destruction as other parts of the State.  However, the lack of adequate evacuation routes for our community caused major traffic delays at the height of the fires, and this could have led to tragic outcomes in less favourable wind conditions.  As such, the following transport priorities for Wollondilly Shire have been reiterated:

·       Rapid bus system for Wilton

·       Future heavy transport needs for the Shire;

·       Evacuation routes

·       Picton bypass; and

·       Fast-tracking of the Wilton interchange.

The advocacy by Council and staff is paying dividends with an infrastructure plan for Sydney Water’s water and sewer supply now developed and an announcement on the timing of delivery of the new public K-12 school understood to be imminent. Discussions are continuing with Transport for NSW regarding appropriate public transport solutions.

The Department of Planning Infrastructure and Environment together with Council is preparing the Wilton staging and sequencing plan which is planned to clearly outline to the community the timing of delivery of all of the infrastructure required for Wilton as it develops.  

In the recently adopted Local Strategic Planning Statement, Wollondilly 2040, finalised in March 2020, Council has identified that many towns and villages are vulnerable to being isolated where the only evacuation routes are through bush fire-prone land in major fires. Other areas also have a long history of infrequent, but sometimes serious, flooding. Planning Priority 18 includes the following action item:  Prepare a study in partnership with emergency service agencies to evaluate the threats and risk level from both natural and manmade hazards and establish appropriate management.

Council resolved at the 16 June 2020 Ordinary Meeting to allocate $200,000 from the National Bushfire Recovery Agency Funding to undertake the Study.

It is noted that funding for the infrastructure for Wilton comes from a variety of sources. Council in December 2019 resolved:

That Council:

1.   Notes that Council is in a strong financial position based on the NSW Office of Local Government financial indicators.

2.   Notes this report that the infrastructure funding for Wilton new town includes:

a.   Council’s Section 7.11 Contributions Plan, currently in development and proposed to total $369 million which will cover all of Council’s identified local infrastructure through the contributions scheme within the current contributions cap

b.   Special Infrastructure Contributions (SIC) for state and regional infrastructure, totalling $771 million under the draft SIC

c.   planning agreements for local, state and regional infrastructure

d.   direct works associated with development and user connections with utilities providers

e.   capital works funded through Government budget processes.

3.   Works with the NSW Government on the Wilton Infrastructure Phasing Plan and continues to advocate strongly on behalf of the current and future Wollondilly community to ensure appropriate and timely infrastructure investment and delivery.

Whilst Council is advocating strongly for NSW Government led infrastructure, it also now has in place its own plan for implementation of local developer-funded infrastructure for Wilton. The Wollondilly Contributions Plan adopted by Council in May 2020 details $340m of developer-funded infrastructure for Wilton including community facilities, 28 local and neighbourhood parks, 10 playing fields, a library, a leisure centre, arterial, sub-arterial and local roads.

Consultation

Council has continued to work collaboratively with the State Government and delivery stakeholders.

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       Letter to Minister for Planning and Public Spaces regarding Wilton Growth Area dated 17 April 2020  

2.       Letter to Minister for Planning and Public Spaces regarding Picton Road interchange dated 11 May 2020  

3.       Letter to Minister for Transport and Roads regarding urgent transport priorities for Wollondilly Shire dated 21 July 2020  

4.       Illawarra Business Chamber’s submission to Infrastructure Australia regarding upgrade of Picton Road dated 28 August 2020   

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

12        Management and Provision of Infrastructure

12.1       Traffic Management Upgrades - Mount Hunter Public School

File Number:           12275#77

 

Executive Summary

This report recommends to implement traffic management measures around Mount Hunter Public School addressing traffic movement conflicts with pedestrian movement leading to child safety risks.

Recommendation

That the following endorsed traffic management upgrades be approved in order to improve pedestrian safety around the school:

1.       LTC Recommendation 1.3 - Proposed Traffic Zones on Spring Creek Road and Westbrook Road adjacent to Mount Hunter Public School.

1.1     Approve the implementation of 140m of ‘No Stopping Zone’ (R5-400) on both sides of Spring Creek Road from Burragorang Road intersection to the south boundary of the school.

1.2     Approve the curtail of existing time restricted (8:00am - 9:30am & 2:30pm - 4:00pm - School Days) ‘Bus Zone’ (R5-20) to 22m from Burragorang Road intersection with Westbrook Road on south side (one way section).

1.3     Approve the implementation of 20m of time restricted (8:00am - 9:30am & 2:30pm - 4:00pm - School Days) 10 minutes ‘Parking Zone’ (R5-14) on south side of Westbrook Road (one way section).

1.4     Approve the implementation of 20m of time restricted (8:00am - 9:30am & 2:30pm - 4:00pm - School Days) 10 minutes ‘Parking Zone’ (R5-14) on north side of Westbrook Road (one way section) adjacent to the Soldiers Memorial Park.

2.       Council continues its advocacy and support for any safety initiative on our roads particularly around schools and increasing child pedestrian safety.

 

Report

Council has been asked to respond to traffic congestion concerns around Mount Hunter Public School following recent exclusion of pick up/drop off vehicles from being able to enter the school compound.

Council officers have attended the site to investigate and observe the issues and have noted that vehicles are parking on the nature strip along both sides of Spring Creek Road along the school boundary, which is illegal under NSW Road Rules 2014 (rule 197).

This is creating a hazardous situation with potential conflicts between parked vehicles, entering/exiting vehicles and children pedestrian movements in and out of the school.

In order to mitigate this safety concern, Council is proposing to implement a ‘No Stopping Zone’ (R5‑400) along Spring Creek Road to reinforce the road rules, prevent parking and remove the conflict of pedestrians and parked vehicles.  Council also proposes to implement a short term (10 minutes) ‘Parking Zone’ (R5- 14) to serve as a ‘Kiss and Ride’ area on Westbrook Road in front of the school.

 

 

Council proposes to use part of the existing time restricted ‘Bus Zone’ (8:00am - 9:30am & 2:30pm - 4:00pm - School Days) and the opposite side of Westbrook Road (one way) adjacent to the Soldiers Memorial Park for this ‘Kiss and Ride’ location.  The bus company has been consulted and supports this proposal.  The School has been consulted with the proposal with no comments received.

Council will list the extension of the existing footpath along Westbrook Road (one way section) within Council's Priority Works Program for new footpath construction, which is prioritised against other competing work requests and subject to the allocation of funding.

In summary, the proposed traffic zones include:

·    140m of ‘No Stopping Zone’ (R5-400) on both sides of Spring Creek Road from Burragorang Road intersection to the south boundary of the school.

·    Reduction of the existing time restricted ‘Bus Zone’ (R5-20) to 22m in length from Burragorang Road intersection on Westbrook Road on south side.

·    20m of time restricted 10 minutes ‘Parking Zone’ (R5-14) on south side of Westbrook Road (one way section).

·    20m of time restricted 10 minutes ‘Parking Zone’ (R5-14) on north side of Westbrook Road (one way section) adjacent to the Soldiers Memorial Park.

·    All time restrictions are consistent with current School Zone times i.e. 8:00am - 9:30am & 2:30pm - 4:00pm - School Days.

The Local Traffic Committee met and discussed the issues on 8 September 2020 and endorsed the recommendations.

Consultation

Referred to the Local Traffic Committee (LTC) for review and endorsement.  The Minutes are available on Council’s website.

Council officers have consulted with Mount Hunter School prior to, and following, the LTC meeting.  Prior to the LTC meeting the school was understanding of Council’s limitations and were supportive.  No response was received following the LTC’s consideration.

Financial Implications

Funding for the recommended actions has been allocated from within the current adopted Operational Budget for 2020/21.

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

12.2       Concept Design for Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct Performing Arts Centre

File Number:           12275#88

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to:

·       Update Council on the project milestones and progress to date for Stage 1 of the Wollondilly Community, Cultural & Civic Precinct and to ensure the project continues to deliver on its commitment to its funding partners and the community.

·       Communicate the process to date on detailing the Master Plan and Performing Arts Centre design development and key design elements that result in even better outcomes than initially envisaged.

·       Acknowledge the ongoing cost implications and the requirement to create an operational role to ensure the auditorium reaches its full potential in the future.

Recommendation

That Council:

1.       Note the achievement of project milestones and progress to date on Stage 1 of the Wollondilly Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct.

2.       Endorse the ‘Concept Design Brief’ for the Performing Arts Centre to allow progression with detail design through to construction in accordance with the program.

3.       Note the operational cost structures for the Precinct development will be included in the drafting of future Operational Plans and supporting budgets.

 

Report

Overview

Stage 1 of the $20.1 million Wollondilly Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct (WCCCP) is well underway and will deliver:

·        Refurbishment and extension of the Shire Hall

·        New Children’s Services and Community building

·        New Performing Arts Centre (PAC)

·        Construction of new car parking in Walton Street

·        Relocation of the Picton Rural Fire Service (RFS) (funded separately but coordinated in this stage).

The PAC construction will have commenced whilst all other elements of Stage 1 will be completed by June 2022.

Project Milestones Achieved

All elements of the WCCCP Stage 1 are being completed to program and key project milestones achieved include:

·        Completion of Wollondilly Shire Hall concept design work and the submission of a Development Application (DA)

·        Completion of concept design work on the Community Building

·        Completion of concept design work on the PAC

·        Refinement of the concept master plan with completion of a detailed master plan (draft) for the Precinct

·        100% detail design of car parking in Walton Street

·        Completion of design of a RFS building at Victoria Park and submission of a DA.

Master Plan Development

The concept ‘Precinct’ Master Plan was endorsed by Council at its meeting of 19 August 2019 to proceed with the Western Parkland City Liveability Program funding application and then into more detailed brief development, detailed master planning and public domain planning phases.  This next level of detail has informed the Project Team on the details of the Precinct site constraints and opportunities, as well as the utilities and services (power/water/sewer) required for each element of construction.  This is to ensure a coordinated approach throughout the delivery of this transformational project.

The detail master planning phase has built on the concept master plan and acknowledges the strategic direction taken at the time.  The first step in this process was a full review of all previous work and the foundation for decisions made, noting that all direction taken to date remains very strong and relevant to the draft master plan now in place.

Master Plan Vision

Council’s vision is for the Precinct to become the community, civic, cultural and economic heart of Wollondilly.  The Precinct will be a meeting place for cultural expression, civic activities, business activity and will bring together community members, the business community and visitors to Wollondilly.

The Precinct will be transformative with significant social, environmental and economic benefits for Wollondilly Shire and the broader community with the key components including:

·        Refurbishment and extension of the Wollondilly Shire Hall

·        New Children’s Services and Community building

·        New Performing Arts Centre

·        New Government Services Centre

·        New Library and Learning Hub

·        Community, Arts, Exhibition and Workshop spaces

·        Significant public open space and public domain works.

Of key importance is that in the adopted master plan, the Picton Masonic Lodge was not included in the final Precinct boundary and, on working through the detail, the site has been identified as a major project constraint and acquisition options are being explored with the Masonic Lodge to find an amicable solution for both parties.

The acquisition of the Picton Masonic Lodge site offers great potential to the master plan as a whole, enabling:

·        Improved function of the Multi-function Theatre building layout, including bump in and out access

·        Ability to further improve the public realm generally on site and the forecourt space to the Theatre and Library along Menangle Street

·        Ability to set-back and open up the building forms to create views to the Village Green and the existing Shire Hall frontage from Menangle Street

·        A single loading and waste location for the site away from high-value public spaces.

Master Plan

See flythrough of 3D Model: https://cloud.wollondilly.nsw.gov.au/index.php/s/dzrAQVdoBxHoqXS

 

 

Evolving the Vision for Precinct

The WCCCP brings together a range of community, civic and cultural uses framed around the central north-south axis of the Shire Hall, Village Green and Civic Forecourt.

The north-south axis has been conceived as a connection of experiences and spaces along the path from Menangle Street to the Village Green.  The public realm has been afforded more space, and allowed the north-south civic link to enhance views to the Shire Hall, and entry experiences into the new facilities.

The architectural form of the Multi-function Theatre marks the south-east corner of the civic precinct as a contemporary gesture to the historic marker of the old Post Office on the corner of Argyle and Menangle Streets.  This important formal relationship extends Picton’s civic precinct from Argyle to Colden Street and forms a gateway into Picton from that direction.

Arrival at the civic precinct will be made clear by the new building forms, with supporting signage, opportunities to advertise events and shows along with night-time ambient lighting.

A new cafe or bar opportunity has been located on Menangle Street under the generous existing tree in the Shire Hall forecourt.  Tiered seating and landscaping create a relaxed and busy forecourt for day-to-day use and special events.

The narrower, existing pedestrian connection to the west of the Shire Hall has been reconceived as an Arts Laneway.  Opportunities for display of work in the new glazed building frontage and overhead catenary lighting create a changeable experience depending on the event, show or mood of the Precinct.

Arriving from Menangle Street, the landscape opens out to the shady and welcoming Village Green.  Arriving from the on-grade car parking to the north, the Village Green is the clear attraction inviting people to enjoy the shade, activity and atmosphere.  The north edge of the Village Green will be permeable but defined to maintain separation between pedestrians and vehicles.

 

Opportunity to connect the Precinct to Argyle Street to the east in the future is maintained.

Picture 1:  Aerial View of Master Plan from South

Picture 2:  Master Plan Landscape and Public Domain

Performing Arts Centre Overview

The Performing Arts Centre (PAC) is a 350 seat, multi-format performance venue delivered in Stage 1.  The PSC will:

·        Deliver modern fit-for-purpose cultural facilities to meet the needs of a rapidly growing community.

·        Develop local capability in Wollondilly for arts, cultural and community activities to reduce reliance on facilities outside Wollondilly, often a significant barrier to participation due to the travel time and costs.

·        Build the cultural base of the Western Parkland City to redress the current imbalance of regional facilities through development of a performance space and other creative arts spaces to retain and attract a larger and more diverse range of performances and creative activities.

·        Support local business development through the provision of facilities for meetings, seminars, as well as activity generating performances.

Performing Arts Centre Strategic Review

A strategic review of the new PAC from Hawkridge Entertainment Services to better understand the strategic positioning of this new venue, identify key users and their needs, and provide an operational overview.

The main uses in the space have been identified as:

·        Dance performances

·        Theatre performances

·        Contemporary music performances

·        Classical music performances

·        Comedy performances

·        Small school events

·        Community events

·        Dinners, cabaret and catered events

·        Civic functions and public lectures.

The space shall be adaptable, supporting a range of different formats and uses, such as:

·        Theatre style performances - end stage, in-the-round

·        An auditorium for performances of classical music and bands (acoustic and amplified)

·        Flat floor presentations – such as dinners, cabaret and civic events

·        Exhibitions and events

·        Cinema nights.

There is not currently a comparable performance facility in the Wollondilly and there is not an immediately identifiable professional touring circuit or market that the facility will attract in the short‑term.

Therefore, it is anticipated that the use and services offering in the centre will need to grow over time.  Equally, the community’s performing experience and ability has the potential to grow if the new facility is designed to allow that to occur.

The performance and support spaces should be constructed to meet the long-term aspirations.  Structure and building infrastructure should be in place to support the purchase of additional theatrical equipment over time to enable the space to increase in its capacity to host and attract more professional and technical shows in the future.

Concept Design Brief

The proposed facilities include:

Front-of-House

·        Forecourt, accessible entry and drop-off area

·        Entry and foyer

·        Box office / Bar and cloakroom

·        Patron amenities

·        Centre administration

·        Rehearsal / meeting space.

Performance Space

·        Sound-lock entry

·        Flat-floor performance space including: seating capacity - 350 on retractable seating bank

·        Removable seating pit to create ‘raised stage’ experience

·        10 x 10m stage area with wings and cross-over

·        Technical catwalks / tension wire grid over

·        Sprung floor suitable for dance

·        Control room

·        Operable wall to divide the room

·        Large, acoustic sliding door to connect the space to the foyer and future library.

Backstage - Performers

·        Green Room

·        Dressing Rooms - 2 x principal

·        Dressing Rooms - 2 x ensemble with sliding door between

·        Performer amenities.

Backstage - Loading and Storage

·        Loading dock, refuse yard

·        Scene dock

·        Laundry / wardrobe

·        Technical office and workshop

·        Crew change

·        Storage.

The proposed facilities are allowed for in the concept design floor plans.  The variable format and available layouts of the PAC allow for a range of configurations, enabling the space to achieve the design goal of the provision of a multi-function theatre as indicated in the attached illustrations.

Consultation

In addition to the wider community consultation completed in the initial phase of master planning by Elton Consulting and the consultation by Stephen Pearse Architecture (SPA) on the Wollondilly Shire Hall, Williams Ross Architects (WRA) conducted more targeted user group based consultation in the concept design phase of the Performing Arts Centre.  Consultation groups included:

Professional:

·        Hawkridge Entertainment Services (Strategic Review)

·        Networked Urban Solutions (Peer Review)

·        Setting Line Theatre Consulting (Planning & Design).

Wollondilly Shire Council:

·        Executive Team

·        Infrastructure & Environment Directorate

·        Community & Engagement Directorate

·        Planning Directorate (within constraints of probity policy).

Local Performance Groups:

·        Picton Theatre Group

·        Sarah’s Theatre and Drama Skills (STADS)

·        Industry Dance Co. Dance School

·        Classics at Picton

·        Picton Harmony Choir

·        A local theatre technician.

Community Advisory Committees:

·        Economic Development and Tourism Committee

·        Youth Advisory Committee.

Schools:

·        Picton High School

·        Wider email communication to local Wollondilly schools.

 

Financial Implications

Consideration of this matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates for this capital project.

Future reports to Council, including consideration of future draft Operation Plans, will provide details on the cost structures for the longer term operation of the new facilities being delivered under this project.

 

Attachments

1.       The Concept Design Brief     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

13        Caring for the Environment

13.1       Proposed Motion from Bland Shire Council to the Local Government Conference Regarding Mining Rates

File Number:           12275#84

 

Executive Summary

Council is an on-going active member of the NSW Mining and Energy Related Councils (MERC) with a Councillor being a member of the Executive.  The vision of this Committee is to “empower, resource and advocate on behalf of local councils impacted by mining and energy production as the peak body in NSW”.

This report provides details of a Notice of Motion endorsed by Bland Shire Council seeking support of members of MERC at the upcoming Local Government Conference in relation to rates applicable to mining properties.  It recommends that Council provide in-principle support to this Motion due to potential significant adverse implications to Council’s revenue structure.

Recommendation

1.       That Council give in-principle support to the Notice of Motion lodged by Bland Shire Council with Local Government NSW as a member council of the Mining and Energy Related Councils due to potential significant adverse implications to Council’s revenue structure.

2.       That pursuant to recommendation 1. above, the in-principle support of Wollondilly Shire Council to this Notice of Motion be advised to Bland Shire Council; the Executive Officer of the Mining and Energy Related Councils; and the Member for Wollondilly.

 

Report

The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Authority (IPART) Review into Local Government Rating in NSW Draft Report was released in June 2016.  This report contained the following recommendation that would have the effect of reducing income previously received from mining properties at a higher mining rate to be the equivalent to a lower business rate:

Any difference in the rate charged by a council to a mining category compared to its average business rate should primarily reflect differences in the council’s costs of providing services to the mining properties.

Council’s submission on this draft report did not support a restriction over the amount of rates that could be raised from mining properties due to significant adverse implications to Council’s revenue structure.  The NSW Government announced its response to the IPART Draft Report in June 2020 that included support to the above recommendation.

Council has received correspondence from Bland Shire Council (Attachment 1) which seeks support to the following Notice of Motion by members of MERC at the Local Government Conference which is to be held in November 2020:

That LGNSW lobby the NSW State Government, in the strongest possible terms, to ensure that Recommendation 34 of the 2016 IPART Review of the NSW Local Government Rating System does not become legislation because of the severe and adverse financial impact this will have on all mining affected communities in NSW.

Advice from Council’s Revenue Section

The reduction of Wollondilly’s mining rate to the business rate would result in a reduction in revenue from the mining category of approximately $400,000 (to $1,300,000) from the current estimate of $1,700,000.

Such a rate reduction would have a large impact on Council’s rate structure with this difference having to be apportioned across the other rate categories, with consequent impacts on other rate payers.

Bland Shire Council’s concerns regarding the intention to enshrine the IPART recommendation in legislation is also supported as being unnecessary as the Minister already has the power under the Local Government Act 1993 to determine that rates for land categorised as mining are to be not more or less than a specified percentage rate for land categorised as business.

Consultation

Council’s Finance Section

Financial Implications

This report does not have any direct financial implications to Council.  However, the recommendations of this report to support Bland Shire Council’s Notice of Motion in-principle is designed to minimise the potential adverse implications to Council’s revenue structure in the event of the proposed reduction of the mining rate to the business rate required by legislation.

Attachments

1.       Background Information to Notice of Motion Lodged by Bland Shire Council with the Local Government NSW Conference     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

14        Looking after the Community

14.1       Proposed Commencement of a Council Preschool Service

File Number:           12275#80

 

Executive Summary

As part of Council’s redevelopment proposals for the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct in Picton, Council’s current Children’s Services Cottage is proposed for demolition and the delivery of child care services is being relocated to a new building within the precinct. This is an opportunity to consider Council’s future child care services model.

The operation of a Council operated preschool has been considered and a high level business analysis has been prepared. The analysis demonstrates that there is a compelling case for Council to operate a preschool given the significant benefits to our community and the financial feasibility of the proposal.

This report outlines the proposal and how it would operate, its financial model, its wide range of benefits, and its relationship to the staging of the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct development.

Recommendation

That Council

1.       Supports the concept of commencing operation of a new preschool service as part of the relocation of childcare services within the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct development in Picton.

2.       Proceeds to undertake further project planning and preparation work with a view towards the new service commencing in 2022.

3.       Be provided with a report prior to May 2021 providing a progress update on project planning and outlining financial implications, with the findings and recommendations of this report to be considered in the preparation of Council’s Delivery Plan and Operational Plans for 2021/22 onwards.

 

Report

Council’s Current Child Care Services

Year Round Care

Out of School Hours care service for school aged children operating out of the Children’s Services Cottage on Menangle Street, Picton. Operates before school from 6:30am - 9am and after school from 3pm - 7pm (school days) and during school holidays 7:00am to 7:00pm.

Occasional Care

Flexible care for children from birth to school age. Operating out of the Children’s Services Cottage on Menangle Street, Picton 10:00am - 2:30pm, Monday, Thursday and Friday, school terms only

Family Day Care

Providing care for small groups of children up to 13 years of age in homes of approved Family Day Care Educators.

 

Year Round Care and Family Day Care are in high demand from local families and are operating as viable service models. Council’s Occasional Care service however needs further consideration regarding its viability to continue as it is no longer in regular, consistent demand from local families and the service model is running at a loss.

 

Need to Relocate and Apply for New Licences

Council is in the process of developing the Wollondilly Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct, and this precinct provides a new location for a Council operated children's service building. The building will be constructed as part of Stage 1 of the precinct development with an anticipated completion in early 2022. Any relocation of children’s services operations from their current operating location to the new building requires Council to apply for new operating licences for those services.

It is proposed to relocate Council’s current Year Round Care service to the new building, with no anticipated change to the model of delivering the service. At this stage it is yet to be determined whether a new licence for Occasional Care to move to the new building will be sought. This matter requires further consideration and will be reported to Council separately.

Family Day Care is not related to the building move as it is delivered from the homes of approved Family Day Care Educators and is administered by Council staff currently occupying leased offices in Argyle Street.

Opportunity to Consider New Service Model

The construction of a new building for the delivery of child care is an opportunity for Council to consider its future child care services model. The operation of a Council operated preschool has been considered and a high level business analysis has been prepared (attached to this report). The analysis demonstrates that there is a compelling case for Council to operate a preschool given the significant benefits to our community and the financial feasibility of the proposal.

Council Operated Preschools

Preschools provide early education and care for children aged between 3 and 6, and some may be licensed for children as young as 2 years of age. Preschools employ professional teachers and generally operate in line with public school terms and school hours.

Council operated preschools are not-for-profit services, where the profit (or surplus) is re-invested in the service. They, as well as those run by not-for-profit organisations, are referred to as “sponsored” community based preschools. The licensee (in this case Council) is the sponsor body which makes all major legal, financial, employment, planning and policy making decisions.

(Note that some preschools in NSW are operated and managed directly by the Department of Education and Training – this is not being proposed).

Some examples of council operated preschools in the Sydney region are listed below:

Liverpool City Council

Casula Preschool

Blacktown City Council

Kids' Early Learning Glendenning

Kids' Early Learning Quakers Hill North

Kids' Early Learning Quakers Hill

Inner West Council

Globe Wilkins Preschool

City of Sydney

Hilda Booler Kinderqarten

Woollahra Municipal Council

Woollahra Preschool

Northern Beaches Council

Manly Community Preschool

Fairfield City Council

Bossley Park Preschool

Fairfield Preschool

Marlborough Street Preschool

Smithfield West Preschool

 

 

Demand for a Council Preschool

KU Children’s Services were engaged to prepare an analysis of the feasibility of operating a Council preschool.  Demographic data and forecasting shows that Wollondilly Shire is home to many families with young children, and this is unlikely to change in the next 20 years. The forecast is for population growth to remain consistent, and for the birth-4 year old cohort to increase over the next 20 years. Although there are many Long Day Care centres operating in the Shire, there are only 4 state funded preschool programs within a 17.5 km radius of Picton, and only one program has a vacancy (on only one day). The report therefore concludes that there would be viable demand for Council to operate a preschool.

There is a strong business case for Council to provide a Preschool service due to the current gap in service provision.

The provision of a community based preschool service strongly aligns with Council’s charter to provide anti-competitive, flexible, quality, accessible and affordable models of service delivery to meet the diverse needs of working families, families in rural communities and vulnerable families including low-income, socially disadvantaged and those with disabilities.

This model will enable the creation of jobs and offer attractive, well supported local employment opportunities for those qualified to work in early childhood educational services.

Preschool Funding

Preschool programs are funded by the NSW State Government through the “Start Strong” funding program. The funding is used towards fee subsidies and operating costs. So preschool programs offer children 15 subsidised hours per week (or 600 hours per year). Children that are booked in for days over and above their subsidised 15 hours attract a full fee.

Start Strong subsidies are greater for “equity” enrolments (targeted high need community groups e.g. aboriginal, vulnerable, or disadvantaged children).

Preschools are able to determine:

·    The relative split between the number of subsided days and full pay enrolment days through the enrolment set up of the preschool, as the setting of a limit on number of days per child means less full pay days. (For example if there was a 2 day limit for all children, there would be no full pay enrolment days).

·    The amount of the Start Strong funding that will be passed on to families as a fee subsidy. The amount not passed on as a fee subsidy can be used to fund the operational costs. Generally this split would be 70%/30%

·    The cost of a full pay enrolment day (full fee applied to children who attend above the 15 hours per week)

·    The proportion of Start Strong funding allocated to “equity” enrolments - generally this would be up to 25% of enrolments.

Funding under Start Strong is paid quarterly in advance and is based on information provided by services through an annual preschool “census” process. KU have advised in their report that there is however a waiting period to receive funding after a new preschool has opened, but funding is back dated when paid. Once a new service is operating, it may need to wait until the next August census to submit information about all children, which would capture children who started since the first data collection.

The financial viability of operating a Council preschool is discussed in more detail below in the Financial Implications section of this report.

 

 

 

 

Proposal

The report by KU modelled two scenarios, a 20 place preschool and a 30 place preschool. For the purpose of this Council report the 30 place option is the preferred proposal for the following reasons:

·    Greater community benefit given greater enrolment capacity.

·    Potential financial operating surplus is higher.

·    The new children’s services building proposed within the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct development is currently being designed to have capacity for a 30 place preschool.

·    KU recommend that the model with the best potential for viability and quality is a 30 place preschool.

The proposed 30 place preschool would be anticipated to generally operate as follows:

Hours of operation

8:00am – 4:00pm

Days of operation

Monday to Friday

Number of operational days

School terms only (40 weeks total)

Plus 2 x child free days (one day before preschool year commences, one day after preschool year concludes)

Licensed places

30

Age of children

3 to 5

Anticipated % utilisation / children per day

90% / 27

Number of Children across week

54

Daily full fee (unfunded)

$55

Start Strong annual funding estimate

$360,000  (based on 2020 funding rates calculator)

Staff to Child Ratio

1:10

Staff requirements (all new positions)

·    Full-time Director (Degree qualified Early Childhood Teacher)

·    2 full-time Early Childhood Educators (Diploma qualified)

·    1 part-time Childcare Assistant (Certificate qualified

·    1 part-time Administration Assistant

 

Relationship to the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct Development

As noted above the new children’s services building proposed within the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct development in Picton is currently being designed to have capacity for a 30 place preschool. The building in its final design stage which will lead to a Development Application being submitted in November/December 2020. A Council decision on whether to proceed with the preschool proposal is therefore required ahead of the DA submission.

If the building was to include a preschool, it is proposed to be configured as follows:

·    30 place preschool on the ground floor with outdoor play immediately accessible and connected at ground level.

·    30 place Year Round Care service operating on the upper floor with its own outdoor area as a rooftop space (i.e. a relocation of Council’s current YRC service with no change to the service model).

 

Timing of the Service Commencement

The proposed new childcare services building is scheduled for completion in early 2022 (subject to DA approval) so it is anticipated that a preschool service could commence approximately mid-2022.

This would mean that throughout 2021 and early 2022 Council would need to be undertaking preparatory activities such as:

·    Applying for the service to be licenced by the Department of Education and Training

·    Finalisation of Start Strong funding payment arrangement details

·    Determining fee structures and enrolment configurations

·    Detailed budget planning

·    Staff recruitment and training

·    Service branding and promotion

·    Enrolment promotion

·    Physical fit-out and set-up of the operation

·    Development of all required operating policies and procedures.

If Council was to proceed with the commencement of a preschool service, a comprehensive project plan would be developed and enacted to support pre­operational activity in 2021 and beyond.

Benefits of a Preschool

Preschool prepares children to learn and develop as they enter school and provides a solid platform for life-long learning and education. It supports their intellectual development, language and communication skills, social development and emotional maturity. There is a significant body of research that demonstrates the benefits of early childhood education for lasting, positive impacts on future educational, health, social and economic outcomes.

Commencing a Council preschool service would be supporting families in the Shire by better enabling parents to work, study or volunteer in the community. This support is of course particularly pertinent to enabling greater workforce participation by women.  Preschool also provides families with the opportunity to be part of a community and connect with others, providing a context to build social connections between families and the community.

Having a preschool at the heart of the new civic redevelopment in Picton would provide economic and social stimulus by drawing families to the new precinct and supporting a vibrant town centre. It would also provide a place in which Council can provide a safe and nurturing space to educate its youngest citizens, displaying commitment to families and young people in the Shire. 

A Council run preschool would also provide benefit to Council as an organisation by offering a convenient, quality service for the children of staff, close to the new Council Services Centre. This would support the attraction and retention of staff.

Consultation

Preliminary consultation regarding the concept of commencing a preschool service has been undertaken with Councillors, Children’s Services staff and Council’s Steering Committee for the Community, Cultural and Civic Precinct development in Picton.

 

 

 

 

Financial Implications

A preliminary annual financial operating model has been prepared based on the following assumptions:

·    A 30 place preschool for 3 to 5 year olds

·    Start Strong annual funding income of $360,000

·    Unfunded (full fee enrolment) annual income of $48,000

·    70% of the Start Strong funding being used towards enrolment subsidies (reduced parent fees) for eligible children up to 15 hours each per week

·    Full daily fees of approximately $55 per day (for enrolment days over and above the 15 hours)

·    30% of Start Strong funding being used towards preschool operations

·    Staff set up generally as outlined above (note however that the indicative rates of pay for staff as outlined in the report by KU are not being used. Higher rates of pay have been assumed to better align with Council’s salary structure and to ensure that any Council run pre-school is able to attract high quality staff)

·    General operating costs (excluding staff costs) have been based on the operating costs of Council’s current YRC Service (roughly comparable given also licenced for 30).

 

Item

Amount

Total annual revenue estimate

($360,000 State Government Start Strong Funding and $48,000 unfunded enrolment fees)

$408,000

Annual operational costs (excluding staff costs)

$30,000

Annual staff costs

$320,000

Net annual operating surplus

$58,000

 

·            Note that although the construction and essential fit out of the building is separately budgeted for as part of the civic precinct redevelopment, there would be an estimated initial set up cost of up to $40,000 likely to occur in the 2021/22 FY (specialist equipment, furniture, educational resources, teaching aids, technology etc.)

 

·            Also, because of the delay in receiving Start Strong Funding after a new preschool opens (as noted above) Council may need to support the preschool financially in the first year, but funding would be applied retrospectively so costs would be recouped retrospectively. The preschool would perform financially beyond the first year without further support as shown in the table above.

 

·            If Council decides to proceed with this proposal, detailed project planning and preparation work will be required including further modelling of financial implications. The findings and recommendations of this modelling would need to be reported to Council in the first half of 2021 in order to be considered in the preparation of Council’s Delivery Plan and Operational Plans for 2021/22 onwards.

 

Attachments

1.       Wollondilly Early Childhood Services Review - Report by KU Children's Services     


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

15        Efficient and Effective Council

15.1       Exhibition of the Wollondilly Shire Council Code of Conduct and associated Procedures and Gifts and Benefits Policy

File Number:           12275#71

 

Executive Summary

The new Model Code of Conduct and Procedures have been prescribed by the Office of Local Government under the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

The new Model Code and Procedures take effect immediately so Council must update its current adopted Code of Conduct and Procedures to reflect the amendments in the new, prescribed Code and Procedures.

 

Wollondilly Shire Council has a major focus on strengthening organisational capacity, increasing transparency and continuing to build community and staff trust in Council. Integrity is the first of Council’s organisational values and a fundamental expectation of the community in Council.

 

As part of this update to Council’s Code of Conduct, it is recommended that Council play a leadership role and establish a $0 gift and benefit position to demonstrate Council’s stance and provide clear direction for staff, the community and Councillors. A zero gift and benefit position establishes an unambiguous position and consistency of approach as it applies to Council officials, which can be clearly  and transparently communicated to ratepayers, residents, customers and suppliers.

Recommendation

That the draft Wollondilly Shire Council Gifts and Benefits Policy, Code of Conduct and the associated Procedures be placed on public exhibition for community consultation.

 

Report

The NSW Office of Local Government has prescribed a new Model Code of Conduct and Procedures under the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

Key amendments to the Model Code and Procedures were outlined to Councillors and the Executive on 17 August 2020.

 

In addition to the prescribed amendments and those made by Council to localise language and references, this draft Wollondilly Code of Conduct also notably includes amendments to the gifts and benefits provisions of the Model Code.

 

Accordingly, Council’s Gifts and Benefits Policy has been amended to align to the amendments to the Wollondilly Code of Conduct and is included for consideration by Council as part of this report.

 

Amendments to Gifts and Benefits Provisions

Wollondilly Shire Council has a major focus on strengthening organisational capacity, increasing transparency and continuing to build community and staff trust in Council. Integrity is the first of Council’s organisational values and a fundamental expectation of the community in Council.

 

In the course of their duties, Council officials may encounter situations in which they are offered gifts or benefits for a variety of reasons. The intent behind a gift is in the vast majority good intentioned however can either be considered as a gift of influence, or a gift of gratitude.

 

Regardless of the intent, public perception is a key consideration in determining Council’s position regarding gifts and benefits offered to Council officials and delegates.

 

It is recommended that Council play a leadership role and establish a $0 gift and benefit position to demonstrate Council’s stance and provide clear direction for staff, the community and Councillors. A zero gift and benefit position establishes an unambiguous position and consistency of approach as it applies to Council officials, which can be clearly  and transparently communicated to ratepayers, residents, customers and suppliers.

 

It also has the potential to reduce the administration cost associated with management of a gifts and benefits framework and the real and perceived risks associated with ‘approximations of monetary value’ where the actual value of a gift or benefit cannot be precisely established.

 

In recognising circumstances where exceptions to the provisions may be appropriate, it is recommended that the CEO be delegated discretion over how exceptions are handled.

 

Proposed comparative amendments and reasons can be found on the attached document; Summary of Changes Section by Section - Model Code_WSC Code.

Consultation

The need for community consultation will be determined by Council. It is recommended these changes be publicly exhibited and the outcomes reported to Council prior to adoption.

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       OFFICIAL DRAFT Wollondilly Shire Council Code of Conduct 2020  

2.       OFFICIAL DRAFT Procedures for the Administration of the Wollondilly Shire Council Code of Conduct 2020  

3.       OFFICIAL DRAFT Gift and Benefits Policy 2020  

4.       Summary of Changes Section by Section - Model Code_WSC Code    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

15.2       Cemeteries Policy Exhibition

File Number:           12275#75

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report serves to progress the transition of Council’s Cemeteries Protocol into an updated policy and recommends that the policy be placed on exhibition.

Recommendation

1.       That Council endorse the public exhibition of the Cemeteries Policy for a period of 28 days with a further 14 days for submissions.

2.       That a report come to Council following the submission period for the Policy to be adopted.

 

Report

Since undertaking the review process of Council’s Cemeteries Protocol, it has identified that it is appropriate that the protocol become a Council Policy as it has a direct impact on the community.

The Cemeteries Policy has been developed to assist in the administration, management and maintenance of cemeteries managed by Council within the Wollondilly Local Government area.  The Policy provides guidelines that ensure the objective functions of the cemeteries are provided in a safe, consistent manner and socially acceptable standards and practices are in place to assist workers, administrators, clients and the general public.

Consultation

The updated policy has been reviewed with respect to relevant legislation and guidelines provided by Cemeteries & Crematoria NSW (NSW Department of Planning, Industry & Environment); Australasian Cemeteries & Crematoria Association; and Cemeteries & Crematoria Association of NSW.

Financial Implications

This matter has no financial impact on Council’s adopted budget or forward estimates.

Attachments

1.       Draft Cemeteries Policy - September 2020    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

15.3       Smoke-Free Areas Policy Exhibition

File Number:           12275#76

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report serves to progress the transition of Council’s Smoke-Free Areas Protocol into an updated policy and recommends that the updated policy be placed on exhibition.

Under the NSW Local Government Act 1993, Councils have the power to legislate in their own jurisdictions to protect their local communities from the effects of second-hand smoke.  Wollondilly Shire currently has in excess of 33 playgrounds, 14 sportsgrounds, 15 community buildings, plus a number of clubhouses linked to sportsgrounds and tennis courts; and numerous verandas and shelters that require inclusion under a smoke-free areas policy in order to limit the impacts of second hand smoke.

 

Recommendation

1.       That Council endorse the public exhibition of the Smoke-Free Areas Policy for a period of 28 days with a further 14 days for submissions.

2.       That a report come to Council following the submission period for the Policy to be adopted.

 

Report

A review of Council’s Smoke-Free Areas Protocol, has identified that it is appropriate that the protocol become a Council Policy as it impacts the community, not just Council staff.

The draft Smoke-Free Areas Policy has been created to address the following objectives:

·        Improve the health of the community.

·        Increase awareness of the dangers and issues related to smoking.

·        Provide a smoke-free environment around Council’s open space facilities.

·        Reduce pollution from cigarette butts around playgrounds; sportsground and sporting facilities; and community buildings.

This Policy will ban smoking in the following areas:

·        Within 10 metres of all playgrounds and play equipment.

·        Within 10 metres of all outdoor fitness equipment.

·        Around and within the identified perimeter of all Council outdoor sporting facilities (netball courts, basketball courts, tennis courts, athletics fields, etc.) and skate parks.

·        Under any verandah, shelter and building associated with Council owned public property.

·        Around and within the identified perimeter of Council leisure centres and public swimming pools.

·        Within 4 metres of an entrance used by pedestrians to get into or out of a public building.

This Policy has been produced to provide evidence of Council’s focus towards the provision of a smoke-free environment in sporting, recreation and community facilities.

Consultation

The updated Policy has been reviewed in accordance with relevant legislation, namely the Smoke‑free Environment Act 2000 and the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Financial Implications

Public exhibition of the Policy, and subsequent implementation following adoption, will incur minor expenditures for consultation and the stage installation of signage.  These costs are within the scope of the adopted budget and capital budgets for projects currently impacting on the recreational areas.

Attachments

1.       Draft Smoke Free Areas Policy - September 2020    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

15.4       Investment of Funds as at 31 August 2020

File Number:           12275#91

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide details of Council’s invested funds as at 31 August 2020.

Recommendation

That the information and certification in relation to the investment of Council funds as at 31 August 2020 be noted.

 

Report

At its last meeting, the Reserve Bank decided to maintain the targets for the cash rate and the yield on 3-year Australian government bonds of 25 basis points. It also decided to increase the size of the Term Funding Facility and make the facility available for longer.

 

The Board commented that:

 

“Under the expanded Term Funding Facility, authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs) will have access to additional funding, equivalent to 2 per cent of their outstanding credit, at a fixed rate of 25 basis points for three years. ADIs will be able to draw on this extra funding up until the end of June 2021. This extension will ensure that all ADIs continue to have access to the Term Funding Facility after the end of September, when the window for drawings under the initial allowance of 3 per cent of outstanding credit closes. Additional allowances associated with an ADI's growth of business credit will now also be available until the end of June 2021.

To date, ADIs have drawn $52 billion under the Term Funding Facility and further drawings are expected over coming weeks. Today's change brings the total amount available under this facility to around $200 billion. This will help keep interest rates low for borrowers and support the provision of credit by providing ADIs greater confidence about continued access to low-cost funding.

The Term Funding Facility and the other elements of the Bank's mid-March package are helping to support the Australian economy. There is a very high level of liquidity in the Australian financial system and borrowing rates are at historical lows. Government bond markets are functioning normally, alongside a significant increase in issuance. Over the past month, the Bank bought a further $10 billion of Australian Government Securities (AGS) in support of its 3-year yield target of 25 basis points. Since March, the Bank has bought a total of $61 billion of government securities. Further purchases will be undertaken as necessary. The yield target will remain in place until progress is being made towards the goals for full employment and inflation.

Globally, an uneven economic recovery is under way after a very severe contraction in the first half of 2020. The future path of that recovery is highly dependent on containment of the virus. High or rising infection rates have seen a recent loss of growth momentum in some economies. By contrast, in China, economic growth has been relatively strong. In financial markets, volatility is low and the prices of many assets have risen substantially despite the high level of uncertainty about the economic outlook. Bond yields remain at historically low levels. The US dollar has depreciated against most currencies over recent months. Given this and higher commodity prices, the Australian dollar has appreciated, to be around its highest level in nearly two years.

 

In Australia, the economy is going through a very difficult period and is experiencing the biggest contraction since the 1930s. As difficult as this is, the downturn is not as severe as earlier expected and a recovery is now under way in most of Australia. This recovery is, however, likely to be both uneven and bumpy, with the coronavirus outbreak in Victoria having a major effect on the Victorian economy.

Employment increased in June and July, although unemployment and underemployment remain high. The virus outbreak in Victoria and subdued growth in aggregate demand more broadly mean that it is likely to be some months before a meaningful recovery in the labour market is under way. In the Bank's central scenario, the unemployment rate rises to around 10 per cent later in 2020 and then declines gradually to be to still around 7 per cent in two years' time.

Wage and prices pressures remain subdued and this is likely to continue for some time. Inflation is expected to average between 1 and 1½ per cent over the next couple of years.

The economy is being supported by the substantial, coordinated and unprecedented policy easing over the past six months. Fiscal policy is playing an important role. Public sector balance sheets in Australia are in good shape, which allows for continued support. Indeed, fiscal and monetary support will be required for some time given the outlook for the economy and the prospect of high unemployment. In addition, support for the recovery is being provided by Australia's financial institutions, which also have strong balance sheets and access to high levels of liquidity.

The Board is committed to do what it can to support jobs, incomes and businesses in Australia. Its actions, including today's extension of the Term Funding Facility, are keeping funding costs low and assisting with the supply of credit to households and businesses. The Board will maintain highly accommodative settings as long as is required and continues to consider how further monetary measures could support the recovery. It will not increase the cash rate target until progress is being made towards full employment and it is confident that inflation will be sustainably within the 2–3 per cent target band.”

 

The majority of Council’s investment portfolio (95%) is invested in deposits / securities with Australian Authorised Deposit taking Institutions (ADI’s). Council has been taking advantage of term deposit “specials” from various institutions without overexposing the portfolio to any one institution. Note that the marked to market valuations on some of the direct investment products in Council’s portfolio remain at less than the face value of the investment. The marked to market value of these investments is expected to be equal to or greater than the face value by the time they reach their maturity date. Early exit from these products would realise losses.

 

The following chart compares Council’s portfolio yield with the benchmark AusBond Bank Bill Index rate in each month for 2019/20 and 2020/21. 

As shown in the chart above, Council’s portfolio yield greatly exceeds the benchmark AusBond 3 month Bank Bill Index due to the prudent investment of Council’s portfolio.

 

Under Reg 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, Council’s Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council each month with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Act.

 

Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 August 2020 is summarised below.

Details of Council’s investment portfolio as at 31 August 2020 are provided in attachment 1.

 

Consultation

Independent advice regarding the investment of Council funds was provided by Prudential Investment Services Corp and a portfolio review has been undertaken to ensure that the portfolio remains appropriate in the current environment.

 

The advice of Prudential Investment Services is that “Council has a well diversified portfolio of term deposits and bank issued bonds from the highest quality institutions in Australia.  No change in Council’s investment strategy is recommended in response to the current market conditions.”

 

 

 

 

Financial Implications

Council continues to invest those funds which, having regard to Council’s Resourcing Strategy 2017/18 – 2020/21 and adopted Operational Plan 2020/21, are not required to manage Council’s day-to-day cash flow or have been identified as required to fund specific future projects and expenditure or anticipated (budgeted) future commitments.

Interest earned is allocated to restricted cash and income in accordance with Council’s adopted budget, policy and legislative requirements. Accrued interest to 31 August 2020 was $518,097.

The chart below compares actual interest received to date with budgeted interest for the year.

 

 

Interest for the month of August represented an increase of 1.30% pa vs the bank bill benchmark of 0.11% pa for the month.

 

The Reserve Bank of Australia has continued to keep interest rates low.

Certification

I hereby certify that Council’s investments have been made in accordance with Sec 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General Regulations) 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

Clair Hardy

Chief Financial Officer

WOLLONDILLY SHIRE COUNCIL

 

Attachments

1.       August 2020 Investment Summary Report    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

15.5       Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisation’s (ISJO) Associate Membership Proposal

File Number:           12275#93

 

Executive Summary

The Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisations (ISJO) is a regional collaboration between Wollongong City, Shellharbour City, Kiama Municipal and Shoalhaven City. The principal functions of the ISJO are to provide strong regional leadership and advocacy on behalf of member Council’s.

At the February 2020 Council meeting, Council resolved to continue to pursue collaborative advocacy with ISJO. The ISJO Board have offered Wollondilly Shire Council an Associate Membership subject to the endorsement from Council.

 

Recommendation

That Council endorse the Associate Membership proposal to join the Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisations (ISJO).

 

Report

Council resolved at its February 2020 meeting:

That Council:

1.       Notes the report;

2.       Agrees to continue the positive and collaborative advocacy with the Illawarra Shoalhaven Joint Organisation (ISJO), the Illawarra Business Chamber and other relevant stakeholders; and

3.       Pursues the use of existing appropriate Governance frameworks as far as possible for delivery of the Action Plan including the City Deal committees, the Planning Partnership office if appropriate for the delivery of the Action Plan.

 

Following discussions between Council and the ISJO Chief Executive Officers, the ISJO Board has agreed to a heavily discounted Associate Membership rate for Wollondilly Shire Council of $5,000.

Membership with the ISJO has a number of benefits, including

·     Increasing our regional leadership and advocacy focus, particularly in regional infrastructure priorities such as Picton Road upgrades and the Maldon-Dombarton Rail Link

·     Regional strategic planning, including high level planning across the region and leveraging economic benefits and community development opportunities from the Western Sydney Airport

·     Opportunities to further develop shared service arrangements enhance Council service delivery.

Some of the programs delivered by the ISJO include the Southern Regional Waste Strategy Program initiatives of Regional Illegal Dumping Prevention and Litter Prevention Programs and the Regional Joint Procurement Program.

 

Consultation

Consultation has occurred with Councillors on this proposal during a Councillor Briefing Session.

Financial Implications

Funding has been allocated and is available to fund the membership cost.

Attachments

Nil  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

16        Notice of Motion/Rescissions

16.1       Notice of Motion - Condell Park Homestead Wilton

File Number:           12275#92

 

I Councillor Matthew Deeth intend to move the following motion:

 

Motion

That Council

1.       Reiterates its support for the heritage Condell Park Homestead as one of the most significant heritage assets in Wilton.

2.       Requests staff to bring a report to Council as a priority outlining how the Homestead can be best protected and enhanced for the community including options for bringing it into public ownership.

 

 

CEO’s Comment

 

A report on this issue can be prepared within existing operational resources.

 

 

Attachments

Nil    


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

17        Closed Reports  

Recommendation

1.          That Council considers the confidential report(s) listed below in a meeting closed to the public in accordance with Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993:

17.1       Proposed Acquisition of Land - Lot 27 DP 32597, 32 Margaret Street, Picton

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business

Negotiations for the acquisition of property would prejudice Council during the negotiation process if released.

17.2       Proposed acquisition of Land Lot 9 DP 233747, 436 Argyle Street, Picton

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business

Negotiations for the acquisition of property would prejudice Council during the negotiation process if released.

17.3       Claim for Domestic Waste Service Charge Refund

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(b) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with discussion in relation to the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer

Application for refund of a commercial waste service.

17.4       Quarterly Legal Status

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act, and the Council is satisfied that discussion of this matter in an open meeting would, on balance, be contrary to the public interest as it deals with advice concerning litigation, or advice as comprises a discussion of this matter, that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege

This report covers outcomes of litigation matters and associated legal expenditure.

2.          That pursuant to Section 10A(1) of the Local Government Act 1993, the media and public be excluded from the meeting on the basis that the business to be considered is classified confidential under the provisions of Section 10A(2).

 

3.          That the correspondence and reports relevant to the subject business be withheld from access to the media and public as required by Section 11(2) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

20 October 2020

 

18        Questions for Next Meeting

No reports this meeting